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  1. #41
    Join Date
    Nov. 20, 2005
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    missoula. mt
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    1,583

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    Quote Originally Posted by Valentina_32926 View Post
    Do you really want to breed a mare who threatens to kick you now? It will only get worse after she foals, especially if she is very protective of the foal - she won't threaten then - just let fly!

    I would not breed her until I had resolved the behavior on the ground. Then after you've tried if you can't resolve the issues do not breed her.
    I am in complete agreement with this. I have contacted a local trainer lady- WONDERFUL at starting horses but not doing too much of it anymore, and she has agreed to come out and help me work with her. I've also been working with her every day since this happened. I THINK I've already seen a change in her attitude but too early to trust her yet.



  2. #42

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    [QUOTE=EquusMagnificus;5335500]I personnally do not believe temperament is directly inherited. I think certain predispositions are inherited but, if not encouraged, the undesirable personality traits will never crop up.

    Um, totally disagree. Bad minds pass on and on and on. That is why there is no room for them in most breeding programs.
    Bad experiences are another thing, dont count for the same, but bad temperament- no room for it.


    Dont know anything about the OP's mare, just sounds like a rude little girl being a beeatch, no boss there as far as she is concerned, is what it sounds like to me.
    get to work on her manners is what I think.
    Healthy Chocolate lets me live the lifestyle I want in order to enjoy the horses I love.

    http://www.xocaichocolatehealth.com
    http://www.matchmakerequine.com



  3. #43
    Join Date
    Oct. 2, 2007
    Location
    Mirabel, QC
    Posts
    2,656

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    Quote Originally Posted by imajacres View Post
    Um, totally disagree. Bad minds pass on and on and on. That is why there is no room for them in most breeding programs.
    Bad experiences are another thing, dont count for the same, but bad temperament- no room for it.
    Then perhaps it is a question of differenciating bad temperament from bad experience, which is quite hard to do when one does not have the whole story on the horse. Even still, unless you are confident that you have been a perfect handler, it could still go wrong without being the horse's temperament's fault.

    I think we all have created a monster at some point in our life, we let a little thing slip thinking it was nothing and it turns around and bit us in the a$$. But thankfully, there's almost always some time to reverse bad attidues.
    www.EquusMagnificus.ca
    Breeding & Sales - Currently: Eventing & Derby prospects
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  4. #44

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    [QUOTE=EquusMagnificus;5338485]Then perhaps it is a question of differenciating bad temperament from bad experience, which is quite hard to do when one does not have the whole story on the horse. Even still, unless you are confident that you have been a perfect handler, it could still go wrong without being the horse's temperament's fault.

    That is where knowing the bloodlines well is such a great help. Then you can make clearer choices about what you want to see in your horse, for good and for bad. And you need to know more than just the sire and dam, you need to know damsire, how likely the ancestors transmit whatever they are/do, etc.
    Especially the dam side.
    Healthy Chocolate lets me live the lifestyle I want in order to enjoy the horses I love.

    http://www.xocaichocolatehealth.com
    http://www.matchmakerequine.com



  5. #45
    Join Date
    Aug. 8, 2001
    Location
    up the hill from the little river (that floods alarmingly often)
    Posts
    3,612

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mozart View Post
    Completely agree.
    You need to get this mare super well handled, do the ground work, even so far as carrying a saddle and being bridled and doing in hand work.

    You can't write her off at this point but I would not want to deal with all the repro work and handling her newborn if she has no respect for you.

    In your position I would send her away to school (out of her element, it is amazing what that does for a cocky young mare) and then turn her out for a few months with somebody's broodmare band. They will further teach her the facts of life.

    Might as well wait a year and make sure you want a foal out of her.
    This. Definitely this!
    Full-time bargain hunter.



  6. #46
    Join Date
    Jun. 9, 2003
    Location
    Alabama
    Posts
    5,497

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    I've been breeding for 30 years and starting youngsters for clients as well. Temperment is very heritable. Everything is. Why would the gene pool leave that out? That said, yes, of course a young horse will test you, particularly if the handling has been minimal. You can assess alot about the youngster with handling and setting boundaries. How they process and respond or react will tell you alot pretty quickly about their temperment, character and work ethic. So, you obviously need to be very consistent in working with her prior to breeding. The other thing is the gene pool -- the dam has been discussed as far as her history and she's a Thoroughbred -- but what are her bloodlines? They factor in as well as the sire, so who is here sire/dam/damsire or name so her pedigree could be pulled up? Just because you bred her to a stallion known for producing good temperments, doesn't mean the resulting foal inherited his temperment over the dam's (although hers may be good, just bad experiences). Just curious since my primary breeding and interest has been Thoroughbreds.
    PennyG



  7. #47
    Join Date
    Jan. 17, 2010
    Posts
    1,693

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    Whenever one of my young horses turn their hindquarters to me in ANY kind of threatening way, I grab a heavy leadrope and toss it out, hitting them on the butt. They may run so I do this in an enclosed space - a small paddock, large stall, roundpen, etc. Every time they present their hindquarters to me in any kind of threatening way, they get the rope tossed at them. When they turn towards me and let me walk to their heads, they get rubbed and rewarded. I do this consistently as I've had two young horses want to test me and they are now grown up, never, never threaten, and we have happy and relaxed relationships. I'm a kind owner, but I am also head mare at my place!



  8. #48
    Join Date
    Nov. 20, 2005
    Location
    missoula. mt
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    1,583

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    UPDATE!!!!
    I am seeing results since I have been consistently working with my girl. Today we had what I think was a major breakthrough. I have been going in to the paddock almost every day with a halter. lead, and dressage whip. Today after we did our usual moving away from pressure thing, I made her stand dead still while I rubbed her all over. Everytime she even thought about moving her butt in my direction (or moving anything in ANY direction for that matter) I pulled her head toward me slightly and made her stand still and continued rubbing on her. Then I took her halter off, and did the same thing- knowing she would use the opportunity to swing her butt toward me. When she did, she got WHACKED. She was shocked, but tried it again, so she got whacked again- and the halter and leadrope thrown at her. After which she came to me and just stood there waiting for her next lesson. When my other filly approached she chased her off. It was as if she finally saw me as MOM instead of a third horse. It was cool! She even followed me around the paddock. This is a mare who I considered anti social, but I was stunned at the change in her behavior today! I'm kind of amazed actually.



  9. #49
    Join Date
    Jan. 31, 2003
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    18,472

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    Welcome to the wierdest/coolest thing about horses. Now she will loff you lots.
    "Kindness is free" ~ Eurofoal
    ---
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances.



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