The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 50
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan. 16, 2009
    Location
    Four Corners
    Posts
    1,188

    Default Would I be nuts to breed my pony?

    First, I should state that I will be breeding her exactly once and I intend to keep the foal for its entire life. And I intend to breed her to a high quality stud.

    She's a 14.1 pony of unknown parentage. I don't plan to breed her until she's worthy of reproducing. In our case it would be a successful lower level eventing career. She could go higher, she jumped out of her corral with a 4.5' fence, but I don't want to. She's very sane, with a couple exceptions due to early abuse. At our first show all I had to do over fences was stay on and steer. I swear she knows when she's being judged. We got a 73.5% on our first dressage test. Sure, it was Intro A, but I'm very proud of it.

    My big concern is this:
    She was completely white at 4 years old and now at five and a half has quite a few melanomas on the underside of her tail. I know this is something I wouldn't want another horse to deal with and I would most certainly run that risk. I definitely wouldn't breed her to a grey, or anything that has ever made a grey, hoping to lower that risk as much as I can.

    So am I nuts? Considering breeding a pony that we know already has a melanoma problem? Ignoring whether she herself is worthy or not, is there a level of awesomeness in which melanomas would be ignored?

    Even if I definitely decide not to breed her it's sure a heck of a lot of fun to look at pony studs


    And since I know someone will want pictures:

    Us doing our jumping thing

    And the closest thing I have to a confirmation shot (taken to show my vet how well her diet was working)



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul. 5, 2007
    Location
    Beside Myself ~ Western NY
    Posts
    12,211

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Desert Topaz View Post
    I definitely wouldn't breed her to a grey, or anything that has ever made a grey, hoping to lower that risk as much as I can.
    Regardless of what you breed her to, she herself has at least a 50% chance of passing grey to her foal.
    ::I do not understand your specific kind of crazy, but I do admire your total commitment to it::



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun. 1, 2005
    Location
    Floral City , Fl.
    Posts
    4,323

    Default

    Cute little jumping picture.
    Sandy
    www.sugarbrook.com
    hunter/jumper ponies



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan. 22, 2006
    Posts
    2,434

    Default

    If you really dont want to deal with grey then I would test her to see if she is homozygous or heterozygous for grey and then decide. If she is homozygous for it that means she will always have grey foals, if she is heterozygous then its a 50/50 chance.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct. 21, 2003
    Posts
    8,704

    Default

    I would tell you to really soul search on WHY you feel you need to breed her? Do you think somehow she will better reproduce what you want than something that may already be on the ground? Or is it just because you LUV her and feel like it because of some emotional reason?

    Searching for a nice foal can be just as fun as searching for a daddy to create a new one. You can actually combine the two! Go have fun searching for that wonderful stallion, and contact the stallion owners about offspring. There are so many wonderful ponies and horses out there for sale right now that need a wonderful loving home (and breeders who would no doubt appreciate the sale).

    Anyway, that's my .02.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    May. 15, 2008
    Posts
    838

    Default

    im with perfect pony- not that shes not cute as a button- but everyone is aware of how many horses there are already on the ground that need homes. this is the same reasoning making me think twice about breeding my mare too. its a hard decision!
    Jazz- 4.9.01 OTTB, loved since 12.6.09
    Skip- 3.3.91 APHA, i miss you buddy



  7. #7
    Join Date
    May. 15, 2008
    Posts
    838

    Default

    and... just the mere thought that having a foal puts my mare at risk for complications or even death makes it even harder!
    Jazz- 4.9.01 OTTB, loved since 12.6.09
    Skip- 3.3.91 APHA, i miss you buddy



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar. 12, 2005
    Posts
    1,922

    Default

    Couple of things to think about. Early greying is thought to be associated with homozygosity for the grey gene so your pony may pass on grey no matter what colour stallion she is bred to.

    Secondly there is a theory that some variations of the grey gene are more predisposed to causing melanoma than others. Sadly your mare has the type that causes early onset melanoma. I've also got a grey mare but have been lucky. At 18 years of age she still appears to be melanoma free (she may have internal ones but since she's getting more and more fleabitten as she gets older I think she's just redistributing the pigment and trying to go back to being a bay!)

    So if you do breed your mare you will probably get a grey and you may get another horse with melanoma at a young age. Is that something you'd be OK about?



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan. 16, 2009
    Location
    Four Corners
    Posts
    1,188

    Default

    I know I'm totally suffering from "But I want a cute little foal" disease Generally I'm able to fight it off, but I just can't kick it this time (hence posting in here so I can be talked out of it if I should be ) I know there are ponies out there that need homes. This pony mare was one and I took her in and its worked out awesomely.

    I don't think its so much emotional (though there's definitely some of that in there) as that she is everything I want in a mount so it makes some sense to me to use her as 1/2 of the base for her eventual replacement. She's the most talented equine I've ever had, but perhaps not talented enough that she should be allowed to add to the gene pool. I will definitely get her tested for heterozygous/homozygous for gray (don't know why I hadn't thought of that.) If she's homozygous then I definitely won't do it.

    I love looking at sale ponies but I got so burned two years ago I'm wary of ever buying a horse I don't know again (supposedly calm anyone could ride him horse ended up having a major spooking problem which resulted in me getting a concussion.) Perhaps in a few years I'll feel otherwise.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct. 2, 1999
    Location
    Mendocino County, CA: Turkey Vulture HQ
    Posts
    17,729

    Default

    She is very cute, and as another pony rider, I wish you many fun years with her!

    But, just to give you some perspective, I would not consider her to be unusually awesome as a large pony until/unless she is successfully competing at Preliminary or getting mid-60's at 2nd level.

    BTW: if you get her to 2nd level, and you can find a junior to ride her, she would be eligible to do the FEI pony test, which seems kind of fun.
    If you are allergic to a thing, it is best not to put that thing in your mouth, particularly if the thing is cats. - Lemony Snicket



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan. 16, 2009
    Location
    Four Corners
    Posts
    1,188

    Default

    I can feel the need to breed leaving... thank you all Feel free to continue posting so I can grind this urge into the dirt.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Oct. 2, 1999
    Location
    Mendocino County, CA: Turkey Vulture HQ
    Posts
    17,729

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Desert Topaz View Post
    I know I'm totally suffering from "But I want a cute little foal" disease Generally I'm able to fight it off, but I just can't kick it this time (hence posting in here so I can be talked out of it if I should be ) I know there are ponies out there that need homes. This pony mare was one and I took her in and its worked out awesomely.

    I don't think its so much emotional (though there's definitely some of that in there) as that she is everything I want in a mount so it makes some sense to me to use her as 1/2 of the base for her eventual replacement. She's the most talented equine I've ever had, but perhaps not talented enough that she should be allowed to add to the gene pool. I will definitely get her tested for heterozygous/homozygous for gray (don't know why I hadn't thought of that.) If she's homozygous then I definitely won't do it.

    I love looking at sale ponies but I got so burned two years ago I'm wary of ever buying a horse I don't know again (supposedly calm anyone could ride him horse ended up having a major spooking problem which resulted in me getting a concussion.) Perhaps in a few years I'll feel otherwise.
    I would suggest you go do some looking at Connemara foals. We have many US Connemara stallions that are very talented and Connemara babies are pretty affordable.

    Just as a for example, I would describe my own (Connemara) pony very much as you describe yours.

    I see your location as Four Corners, which suggests to me you might try arranging a road trip to Wildwych Connemaras
    If you are allergic to a thing, it is best not to put that thing in your mouth, particularly if the thing is cats. - Lemony Snicket



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Oct. 21, 2003
    Posts
    8,704

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Desert Topaz View Post
    I love looking at sale ponies but I got so burned two years ago I'm wary of ever buying a horse I don't know again (supposedly calm anyone could ride him horse ended up having a major spooking problem which resulted in me getting a concussion.) Perhaps in a few years I'll feel otherwise.
    Problem is, a baby is a baby is a baby. You will have a heck of an easier time determining a foal's temperament and likely soundness if you buy one from proven bloodlines that you can actually meet and see on the ground, than if you breed your own from unknown bloodlines hoping the foal has the mom's temperament.

    You are more likely to have a good experience recovering from "cute little foal" disease if you buy one on the ground rather than breed one from scratch, statistically speaking.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Oct. 21, 2003
    Posts
    8,704

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by poltroon View Post
    Just as a for example, I would describe my own (Connemara) pony very much as you describe yours.
    OMG me too!



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jan. 13, 2008
    Posts
    6,449

    Default

    I think your pony is very cute. Her conformation isn't perfect, but she is nicely balanced overall and looks to be well put together and sturdy .

    However, the early onset melanoma/greying gene would rule out breeding her if she were mine. I believe carrying a foal may cause more problems with the melanomas ... pregnancy hormones can aggrevate some cancers ... I am no expert on this, but ask about that also.

    You have her ... and she can give you all the riding time you need while you keep your eyes open for another pony or even a pony yearling.
    Last edited by BaroquePony; Jan. 5, 2011 at 06:11 PM.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jul. 5, 2007
    Location
    Beside Myself ~ Western NY
    Posts
    12,211

    Default

    Also.. for the money you would spend breeding, you may be able to afford two weanlings that could grow up together. I would never ever (again), on purpose, raise ONE foal as an only child.
    ::I do not understand your specific kind of crazy, but I do admire your total commitment to it::



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Oct. 13, 2008
    Location
    MI & FL
    Posts
    794

    Default

    Desert Topaz, cute mare. I wish you lots of good luck with her. Ponies are FUN!

    Stolensilver, I am admittedly very uneducated in regards to color genetics, but I was unaware of this:
    " Early greying is thought to be associated with homozygosity for the grey gene so your pony may pass on grey no matter what colour stallion she is bred to."
    I have a 2 yo colt that was born light and is proceeding to turn from dapple grey to white at an early age, and his mother is now pure white too, and has only ever produced greys. She hasn't had a ton of foals, but I wonder if that is what is going on here!! (no melanomas though, and she is 18)



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Jan. 28, 2002
    Location
    Alberta, Canada
    Posts
    5,162

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Summerwood View Post
    Stolensilver, I am admittedly very uneducated in regards to color genetics, but I was unaware of this:
    " Early greying is thought to be associated with homozygosity for the grey gene so your pony may pass on grey no matter what colour stallion she is bred to."
    I don't believe this myself and wonder if it's an old wive's tale. We have many foals by Alvesta Picasso, out of solid mares (so the foal cannot be homozygous), who have completely greyed out at a month of age. Yet, we have a couple of homozygous greys by Picasso who are still dark steel grey at 4 years of age. .....I know it's just one sire example, but in my case, this theory doesn't work for my ponies.

    Quote Originally Posted by Desert Topaz View Post
    I definitely wouldn't breed her to a grey, or anything that has ever made a grey,
    And just to make sure it's clarified, only a grey can produce a grey. So, for example, if you are looking at a bay stallion and he has a few grey offspring...it would only be because the mare he was bred to was grey. In which case, the sire would have absolutely nothing to do with producing the grey, as he would have no grey gene to pass on to the foal.
    Last edited by Daventry; Jan. 5, 2011 at 06:05 PM.
    www.DaventryEquestrian.com
    Home of Oldenburg, Westphalian & RPSI approved pony stallion Goldhills Brandysnap
    Also home to Daventry Equine Appraisals & Equine Expert Witness www.EquineAppraisers.com



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jan. 28, 2002
    Location
    Alberta, Canada
    Posts
    5,162

    Default

    While I'm sure there isn't a pony stallion out there that wants to turn down business....I personally wouldn't breed her. And bear with me as I'm just being honest.

    You've already mentioned that you are very concerned about her melanomas at such a young age. That would do it for me right there! You don't want to produce another grey, but with her being grey herself, you already have a 50% chance of producing a grey foal! She's of unknown parentage, and while I'm sure she is a super little show pony for you and you love her to death, I don't think her conformation is OK enough to warrant trying to produce another animal. Because she is not build well (doesn't stop her from being a great little show pony), and you don't know her lineage, she possibly could throw a huge unknown into the equation, as far as conformation, build, etc. goes.

    As others have mentioned, it's pretty easy for a decently trained pony to get a score of 70 at Intro level...and nearly every horse or pony on the planet can jump out of a 4 1/2 foot paddock. The key is....whether they can jump 12 fences at 4 1/2 feet...and then the numbers dwindle down considerably

    Quote Originally Posted by Desert Topaz View Post
    Ignoring whether she herself is worthy or not, is there a level of awesomeness in which melanomas would be ignored?
    With severe melanomas at such a young age, definitely, there is a level in which I may still breed a mare. But she would have to be super fancy, conformationally, very correct, an exceptional mover and stellar form over fences. There are just so many reasonably priced, wonderfully fancy ponies already out there looking for great homes, I just wouldn't see any reason to breed unless I was sure I could produce something comparible, or better, to what is already out there for sale.

    If you add up how much money you are going to have to spend on a stud fee, vet costs, etc. to get her in foal...then the costs for the next year while she is in foal, costs of foaling her out and then raising the foal to riding age....that is a lot of money being spent on one little pony that you're not sure about in the first place.

    With the economy so poor right now and prices so low, you would be much better off purchasing a two year old pony or three year old pony from reputable bloodlines...and at least have something you can start under saddle ASAP and not have any added expense. Crumb, I've got a quiet three year old who hasn't been started under saddle yet from great bloodlines and for very little money...because the economy is so bad. I'm sure there must be something quiet and sensible in your area to chose from, and then your mare can continue with her job as a fun little show pony for you.
    www.DaventryEquestrian.com
    Home of Oldenburg, Westphalian & RPSI approved pony stallion Goldhills Brandysnap
    Also home to Daventry Equine Appraisals & Equine Expert Witness www.EquineAppraisers.com



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jan. 16, 2009
    Location
    Four Corners
    Posts
    1,188

    Default

    Urge to breed now completely dead.

    I truly appreciate all of your comments.


    Quote Originally Posted by poltroon View Post
    I see your location as Four Corners, which suggests to me you might try arranging a road trip to Wildwych Connemaras
    I wonder if my husband would let me have, like, ten ponies



Similar Threads

  1. What pony breed does this look like?
    By Amwrider in forum Off Course
    Replies: 23
    Last Post: Aug. 11, 2010, 05:05 PM
  2. Replies: 61
    Last Post: Mar. 31, 2010, 05:40 PM
  3. Pony makes me nuts (in a good way)
    By hellerkm in forum Hunter/Jumper
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: Sep. 25, 2009, 08:23 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •