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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun. 11, 2007
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    2,842

    Default Hoof Boot Help.

    Per the vet's recommendation, we will be pulling Gus's shoes and putting him in the wedge pads plus boots.

    This is what her latest email says:

    I've been thinking a lot about it and reviewed the photos several times, and it concerns me that I can't seem to see where the heels hit the ground--is it where the cracks and bruising are? I think what I'd really like to do is take him out of the shoes, and put him in boots with wedge pads. This way, we're still getting the wedge, but his feet can expand and perhaps we'll get less of the contraction in the heels--and I think I'd like to let him grow out a little.
    I'm perfectly fine with putting him in boots again BUT he's on pasture board 24/7 and it's snowy here, and icy as well. I need something that'll work well in these conditions. I really can't afford stall board plus with his stifle issues and the cold weather, it's a real catch-22 with him anyways.

    Any boot recommendations? I had him in Boa's but the lacing system broke this summer and I just haven't gotten around to replacing it. My budget is slim as well... nothing over $150/pair.

    I had really liked the look of the Easy Boot Rx. Are there any other recommendations out there? I am planning on getting x-rays at the time of shoe removal as well, so we can see exactly what we're dealing with.


    ETA: I might be able to get the barn to bring him in and feed him in his stall AM/PM so he can have his boots off and give his hooves a chance to breathe, but otherwise he's outside 24/7 unless I'm there.
    Proud owner of Gus & Gringo.
    See G2's blog
    Photos



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep. 7, 2006
    Location
    WNY
    Posts
    5,484

    Default

    I'm looking for something similar.. The Easycare website has a chart: http://www.easycareinc.com/education/new_to_boots.aspx . Scroll down about 2/3 of the way. Just below the chart lists the boots with a brief description of what they're good for.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun. 11, 2007
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    2,842

    Default

    Thanks. I had forgotten about their (Easyboot) chart... but that still doesn't help me all that much . It's hard to find something that'll do EVERYTHING I need it to do. I guess I need to figure out what I can compromise on and go from there.
    Proud owner of Gus & Gringo.
    See G2's blog
    Photos



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun. 10, 2001
    Location
    nj
    Posts
    8,783

    Default

    i think it's problematic to leave a horse on 24/7 turnout in boots. and even more so in the conditions you describe. did you discuss these issues with the vet?
    first, i'd be concerned about rubs from the boots since none of them are meant to be on 24/7. second, i'd be worried about him slipping on ice and snow. that second concern may be addressed with studs which i believe you can screw into at least some of the easy care boots, but do you want your horse wearing snow studs 24/7?
    http://www.eponashoe.com/
    TQ(Trail Queen) \"Learn How to Ride or Move Over!!\" Clique



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul. 5, 2007
    Location
    Beside Myself ~ Western NY
    Posts
    6,314

    Default

    We have one horse in Cavallos. They give good traction, and don't pack snow. But, I cannot, for the life of me, get the keeper over the velcro tab, so they DO collect snow in the velcro and will eventually come off. That is, if the horse tolerates them long enough not to remove them with his teeth, which he has been known to do. So, sometimes he wears giant bell boots OVER the Cavallos. The whole ensemble is bright pink. That makes the pieces eacy to find in the snow, but may contribute to his wanting to remove them.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun. 5, 2007
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    1,190

    Default

    I've heard that the Easyboot glue on has been applied and left on for up to 6 weeks and left the hoof in good shape. You'd want to pack the frog with Magic Cushion, or the like and either use Goober Glue or Vettec Adhere....it would give you a booting option without the worry of rubbing and damage to the soft tissue.

    I'd give it consideration if I were in your position. You may need to get creative with traction options as I wouldn't want to have a horse walking around on the Easy Care ice studs all the time, but I don't think that would be too hard to configure....

    Just a thought. Good luck!



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun. 11, 2007
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    2,842

    Default

    Thanks everyone for the ideas. The vet is very much aware of Gus's boarding situation. Still, she suggests boots. We did boots 24/7 for about 6 weeks with only minimal issues. However that was in the early summer and it was very much hot and dry here at that time. Exact opposite right now. His only issues then were due to ill-fitting boots, and even then it was a minor issue.

    I'd rather not do studs if possible, but will certainly use them if needed. He's actually in front shoes + pads currently WITHOUT studs and managing just fine. But the boots are a whole different issue and I want him to have the best possible outcome.

    Anyways, I appreciate all the ideas. Please keep them coming.
    Proud owner of Gus & Gringo.
    See G2's blog
    Photos



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar. 30, 2004
    Location
    Lexington, KY
    Posts
    2,950

    Default

    Call EasyCare- their customer service reps have actually touched both a horse and a hoof boot and are extremely helpful!!
    send some of their smart literate deer who can read road signs up here since ours are just run of the mill dumb ones who get splatted all over creation because they won't stay in the woods



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep. 25, 2005
    Location
    The Land of the Frozen
    Posts
    13,787

    Default

    In my opinion the Soft Rides are better for really long-term 24/7 use. The inside of the boot is soft and more padded where it contacts the heel bulbs. But I also use and have used in the past, the Rx boots with great success. Of course you can apply studs to either style of boots, but you may not have to. In my experience, these boots offer ok traction as long as you're not talking slick, glare ice.

    The other thing, is that the Easyboot Grips, and Old Macs have aggressive tread that are GREAT in snow and ice. They're not as soft on the inside as therapy boots and might cause rubbing, but they would provide more traction.

    The Easyboot glue on would be problematic because you need cushioning and padding for a horse like this, and you cannot use anything inside the boot when you glue them on.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug. 9, 2007
    Posts
    9,019

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Auventera Two View Post
    In my opinion the Soft Rides are better for really long-term 24/7 use. The inside of the boot is soft and more padded where it contacts the heel bulbs. But I also use and have used in the past, the Rx boots with great success. Of course you can apply studs to either style of boots, but you may not have to. In my experience, these boots offer ok traction as long as you're not talking slick, glare ice.

    The other thing, is that the Easyboot Grips, and Old Macs have aggressive tread that are GREAT in snow and ice. They're not as soft on the inside as therapy boots and might cause rubbing, but they would provide more traction.

    The Easyboot glue on would be problematic because you need cushioning and padding for a horse like this, and you cannot use anything inside the boot when you glue them on.
    The soft-rides are great, but I do not know if they can stay out in a pasture 24/7. They can stay on in a stall 24/7 for 3 months, I do know that much. And while one is supposed to take them off daily to remove dirt and shavings, I found no shavings or anything in them each day. You can buy the inserts. And the lady at soft-ride will tell you which boots the inserts will work in. The "Willie" thread by eventgroupie2 has info on soft-rides. My vet now has lots of horses in them after seeing them on Cloudy.
    Soft-rides do not rub.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun. 11, 2007
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    2,842

    Default

    Thanks everyone for their help.

    I plan on measuring Gus this afternoon when I'm out to the barn. Can I take fairly accurate measurements with shoes still on?

    Unfortunately just pulling the shoes and applying boots right away is not an option because I'm needing new boots and I don't want to have a major disaster on my hands if we pull shoes + 2 degree wedge pads and make him go barefoot right way. He's been in the wedge pads since August and I think just pulling him off those right away will be the straw that broke the camel's back.
    Proud owner of Gus & Gringo.
    See G2's blog
    Photos



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Sep. 25, 2005
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    The Land of the Frozen
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by cloudyandcallie View Post
    The soft-rides are great, but I do not know if they can stay out in a pasture 24/7.
    Yes they can. I know several horses who at one point in their lives lived in Soft Rides 24/7 in both the stall, and in turnout. The one horse ended up just plain wearing the boots out and she had to buy new ones. He was in them for an entire summer out with a herd of horses. He would buck and run and go through mud and rocks. He did absolutely fine in them. The other horses so far as I know never wore their boots out.

    Appychik - I agree to not just pulling the wedges off and putting him flat down inside a hoof boot. If you go with the Soft Rides, you can in effect create a wedge pad with the dual density - soft at the toe, firm at the heel. The toe will sink in further than the heel, keeping the heel elevated a couple of degrees. I've done this with a navicular horse before VERY successfully.

    And yes, you can measure with shoes on. Just find the widest portion of the foot, and measure to the outside rim of the shoe. For the heel to toe measurement, make sure your measuring ruler goes to the tip of the actual toe - not the end of the shoe - because the shoes may be set back a bit.

    Measuring for one of the more "forgiving" types of boots like this is fine. If you're measuring for Epics, Bares, or Gloves, then no I wouldn't recommend it. But being off a couple of millimeters is fine when measuring for Rx or Soft Rides, or even Boas or Old Macs. Essentially, if you aren't expecting the horse to do performance work in a working boot, the measurement doesn't need to be "quite" as precise.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Aug. 28, 2007
    Location
    Triangle Area, NC
    Posts
    6,707

    Default

    okay, you OWN boas that need new cables, need this to stay budget friendly.... why not just buy new cables?
    boa boots fit a very specific hoof shape that not many other boots fit, you may need to stick with boas
    for heel bulb protection try elasticon bandaging, or vet wrap (doesn't last as long)
    www.destinationconsensusequus.com
    chaque pas est fait ensemble



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Mar. 26, 2007
    Location
    SE PA
    Posts
    1,483

    Default

    There's a horse at my barn who's turned out 24/7 in soft-rides. They do their job, but she wears them out quickly. The owner goes through several pairs a year, and they're not cheap.
    RIP Victor... I'll miss you, you big galumph.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jun. 11, 2007
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    2,842

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Petstorejunkie View Post
    okay, you OWN boas that need new cables, need this to stay budget friendly.... why not just buy new cables?
    boa boots fit a very specific hoof shape that not many other boots fit, you may need to stick with boas
    for heel bulb protection try elasticon bandaging, or vet wrap (doesn't last as long)
    Unfortunately, Gus's hooves have decreased at least a whole boot size since I originally purchased the boots two years ago. This summer we made them work to see if we could "fix" the situation with pads/shoes. I didn't want to throw shoes on unless we knew for sure they would work for what we needed.

    So, while I do plan on getting the Boa's fixed, they currently are too large for Gus and not work the risk to use. I'd love to use them if they still fit...

    Quote Originally Posted by Auventera Two View Post
    I agree to not just pulling the wedges off and putting him flat down inside a hoof boot. If you go with the Soft Rides, you can in effect create a wedge pad with the dual density - soft at the toe, firm at the heel. The toe will sink in further than the heel, keeping the heel elevated a couple of degrees. I've done this with a navicular horse before VERY successfully.

    And yes, you can measure with shoes on. Just find the widest portion of the foot, and measure to the outside rim of the shoe. For the heel to toe measurement, make sure your measuring ruler goes to the tip of the actual toe - not the end of the shoe - because the shoes may be set back a bit.
    Thanks. I'm hoping to get an accurate measurement and then see about getting some boots + pads. I've got to talk to my vet to see if she thinks the Soft-Ride pads will work or if she'd like to stick with the other pads that Gus is currently wearing. I really like the idea of the Soft-Ride pads. Makes sense and I think they would be a lot more comfortable then the pads he's in now.
    Proud owner of Gus & Gringo.
    See G2's blog
    Photos



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Aug. 9, 2007
    Posts
    9,019

    Default

    Did you measure? Callie's were like 5 inches so is that too large? Will inserts fit in cavallos?
    Cloudy's soft-rides are the size 4, which are going to be too big for Gus to borrow.
    The good thing about soft-rides is that unlike other hoof boots, you do not have to limit the time that they can stay on the hooves. Cloudy wore them for 3 months but he was stalled. They are not the hard sided boots like cavallos.

    Measure and PM me. I don't want you to put the cavallos on with soft-ride inserts if you have to take them off every 12 hours.

    Forgot: What would happen if you got the soft-ride inserts and used the casting material to wrap them? That lasts outside, my farrier has some other clients whose horses he has put the casting materials on and they have stayed on for 5 or 6 weeks. ??????

    And I've used both the soft-ride boots and cavallos with and without shoes, depending on who is throwing what shoe.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Aug. 9, 2007
    Posts
    9,019

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BigHorseLittleHorse View Post
    There's a horse at my barn who's turned out 24/7 in soft-rides. They do their job, but she wears them out quickly. The owner goes through several pairs a year, and they're not cheap.
    This is correct. They aare not hard-sided (which is why they can be worn 24/7 and do not rub.) and cannot hold up to mud and snow and ice.



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Aug. 9, 2007
    Posts
    9,019

    Default You've Got Mail.

    Well you will probably Monday, priority mail, squeezed into flat rate box. Insured so if you don't get them, I'll give you the insurance $.

    Let me know when they arrive. Hopefully they will fit and with the soft-ride inserts you are buying, maybe they can be worn for longer periods that normally recommended.

    A gift from Partly Cloudy the Hessen Horse.



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jun. 11, 2007
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    2,842

    Default

    Thanks cloudyandcallie! Gus will be frantically searching his mail box for the goodies.

    Proud owner of Gus & Gringo.
    See G2's blog
    Photos



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Apr. 22, 2006
    Posts
    1,331

    Default

    I need to get boots for my pony who has foundered. My vet has recommended Soft Rides, but the price is a bit steep for me right now. Who can give me some info about the difference between the Soft Rides and the Easyboot Rx? The Rx is significantly less expensive so I'd like to go with that if it would work. I wish I could see them both side by side but that isn't an option.
    "The captive bolt is not a proper tool for slaughter of equids they regain consciousness 30 seconds after being struck fully aware they are being vivisected." Dr Friedlander DVM & frmr Chief USDA Insp



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