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  1. #1
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    May. 6, 2007
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    Default Kale as a treat?

    Disregard! Feeding kale is not a good idea! Found this after I posted my query.

    http://www.practicalhorsekeeping.com...ousPlants.html

    Sometimes, what is safe for you to eat can be toxic to your horse. Cabbage, broccoli, onions, chives, kale, elderberry, pokeweed and rhubarb can be toxic for herbivores such as horses. At the end of the garden season, be careful what you toss over the fence to the horses!
    Last edited by johnnysauntie; Jan. 3, 2011 at 12:15 PM. Reason: updated info
    Don't wrassle with a hog. You just get dirty, and the hog likes it.

    Collecting Thoroughbreds - tales of a re-rider and some TBs



  2. #2
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    Aug. 30, 2007
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    Default

    Not so sure I believe that, as my bunny's favorite food is kale, and rabbits have near identical digestive systems to horses..
    Tell a Gelding. Ask a Stallion. Discuss it with a Mare... Pray if it's a Pony!



  3. #3
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    Mar. 10, 2003
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    Default

    My guys get kale and broccoli regularly as part of their reg. diets and cabbage, too. Cabbage is particular useful in the relief and recovery from ulcers.
    --Gwen <><
    "Treat others as you want to be treated and be the change you want to see in the world."
    http://www.thepenzancehorse.com



  4. #4
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    Default

    Kale (along with mustard greens and spinach) is high in oxalic acid and shouldn't be fed to bunnies on a regular basis. It can lead to uroliths.



  5. #5
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by chaltagor View Post
    Kale (along with mustard greens and spinach) is high in oxalic acid and shouldn't be fed to bunnies on a regular basis. It can lead to uroliths.
    High in oxalic acid =/= toxic.
    Tell a Gelding. Ask a Stallion. Discuss it with a Mare... Pray if it's a Pony!



  6. #6
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    Default

    At the level of fed as a treat, it should cause no problem in the average horse.
    "It's like a Russian nesting doll of train wrecks."--CaitlinandTheBay

    ...just settin' on the Group W bench.



  7. #7
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    Dec. 27, 2006
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    Default

    The notion that kale is toxic is hogwash. See informative table and discussion here:
    http://oxalicacidinfo.com/

    "Summing Up
    We think it is nuts for anyone not already under medical advice to select this leafy green over that based on oxalic-acid content.

    Oh, and don't eat several pounds of rhubarb leaves (which no one eats anyway) at one sitting.'



  8. #8
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    Dec. 13, 1999
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    Greensboro, NC
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    Default

    "toxic" in the eyes of many of those sites is very, very subjective. Apple seeds are technically toxic due to cyanide, but how many horses have eaten whole apples, even multiples a day, for years, and haven't keeled over?
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



  9. #9
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    Jul. 20, 2004
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    Default

    Very interesting. Every time I get an edible arrangement (fruit "flower" arrangement) I always give the leftover canteloupe and honeydew melon and ornamental kale that they stuff in the basket to the horses and they very much appreciate it. It never occurred to me I could be poisoning them.

    So far it hasn't affected anyone negatively, including the ancient mini whom I guess would be most succeptible to poisoning (though I have my doubts on that...she is so ancient I think her innards may actually be petrified).



  10. #10
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    Default

    I ended up chopping up the rest and putting it in the soup. Enough red pepper flakes masks the too-kale-y for my tastes result. It's a superfood, so I'm going to choke it down. But I wish I hadn't been so hasty. The mare would have appreciated a fresh green treat. I'm going to pick up some carrots - with tops - for her.
    Don't wrassle with a hog. You just get dirty, and the hog likes it.

    Collecting Thoroughbreds - tales of a re-rider and some TBs



  11. #11
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jeano View Post
    The notion that kale is toxic is hogwash.
    I wouldn't make a blanket statement like that.

    It certainly *can* be. Kale anemia is a well recognized entity in livestock.
    "It's like a Russian nesting doll of train wrecks."--CaitlinandTheBay

    ...just settin' on the Group W bench.



  12. #12
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    oh, certainly if the livestock in question is eating nothing but. Otherwise, normal kale, normal ingestion, access to other foods, no, not harmful. People can and HAVE eaten themselves into vitamin A toxicity by snarfing down too many carrots. Better lock up those nasty toxic carrots, dont give your horse any, either.



  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeano View Post
    oh, certainly if the livestock in question is eating nothing but. Otherwise, normal kale, normal ingestion, access to other foods, no, not harmful. People can and HAVE eaten themselves into vitamin A toxicity by snarfing down too many carrots. Better lock up those nasty toxic carrots, dont give your horse any, either.
    I'm not talking about people. I'm talking about livestock.
    Even if I were, vitamin A toxicity does not occur from overconsumption of beta carotene in carrots.

    Kale can and does cause toxicity in livestock grazed on it. It does not have to be the sole source of food in those cases, just freely available.
    Ruminants are more susceptible than horses.

    That's why I stated earlier that kale in the amounts fed as a treat would not be an issue.
    However, I would not reccommend pasturing animals where large quantities were available.
    "It's like a Russian nesting doll of train wrecks."--CaitlinandTheBay

    ...just settin' on the Group W bench.



  14. #14
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    Default

    Yep, important difference between ingesting beta carotene and Vit A. Excess bc is excreted. Excess Vit A builds up and causes all sorts of problems all over the body.

    My hands did turn orange after a I spent a few weeks eating a LOT of carrots
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



  15. #15
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    Jul. 29, 2006
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    Default

    I don't give Kale to my horse since Kale chips are way too tasty!

    http://allrecipes.com//Recipe/baked-...ps/Detail.aspx

    I would never have thought you could make something as tasty as a potato chip from Kale, but my CSA taught me different.

    ETA, the recipe I use has you add a little apple cider vinegar in as well- just a tablespoon.



  16. #16
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    Nov. 1, 2005
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    Default

    Funny, this thread caught my eye as I have read that kale chips are the new "it" food.

    I was going to try to make kale chips for a giggle, perhaps I will share one or two with horses!



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