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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan. 26, 2009
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    603

    Default What are foals selling for these days?

    For those of you who breed, if you breed for olympic sports or hunters, what are you currently selling your foals for, both low and high end (and middle too ) What do you find is selling (discipline and bloodline wise) or what are you getting the most interest on? How long are you finding you have to hold on to your babies before they are selling? Just curious what the market is like and if foals are selling at all, really.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr. 11, 2006
    Location
    Collingwood,ON
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    1,376

    Default

    No one else has replied so I guess I will just jump in here . . . I think the question is, what are foals NOT selling for At least in my area, I don't think the foal market (or even the horse market in general) is very good. I have a very pretty 2010 German Oldenburg filly, by a popular stallion in Germany (frozen semen) out of a MMB mare who comes from a solid damline full of sucessful performance horses. I originally priced her at $15,000 and now the price has dropped to $10,000 and I have only had one legitimate inquiry (no sale). I have nice professional photos of her and her dam and grand dam, video available etc, no interest . . . I know other breeders out there are selling foals but it's not been a good year for me.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct. 21, 2009
    Location
    Lookeba, OK
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    282

    Default

    Me either. I have a beautiful Old/NA filly by Edelweiss out of a MMB mare priced at $8,500. A few emails, a few offers to trade, but nothing serious. HOWEVER...I have had a BUNCH of people who have seen her pictures and said if she was a 3 yr old they would snap her up.
    I guess I might hang on to her for a few more years.
    Katherine
    Proudly owned by 7 horses, 6 dogs, 3 cats and 1 Turkey
    www.piattfarms.com



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan. 21, 2003
    Location
    Charles Town, WV
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    Default

    I don't even advertise foals anymore. People just don't want to pay for 3 years board on an animal they can't ride. Foals also cannot just be boarded at a riding stable either. Takes knowledge to bring them up right. I just wait until they are under saddle. Basically, it seems that only someone very knowledgeable of what you have, who has the ability and space to raise them, who knows that they are taking a chance on a possible 'great one' for a bargain price and gets to raise it themselves, or another breeder, is interested in foals these days.
    Tranquility Farm - Proud breeder of Born in the USA Sport Horses, and Cob-sized Warmbloods
    Now apparently completely invisible!



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun. 4, 2002
    Location
    Suffolk, VA
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    16,684

    Default

    I will say the same for my non WB's...a rare breed...selling a foal is next to impossible unless you find a hobby or preservation type person and then they don't want to pay a decent price for them. My competition (big ranches) out west sells for very low prices so why buy from me when you can pay less..it IS frustrating especially when the standard of care and handling is often very different.

    I find it interesting that the high end WB market is now feeling the same pain that the rest of the horse industry has had for a while now.

    I have found that trained youngsters or well started ones in the right place...say a trainer in an expensive part of the country...can bring very good prices. It's just hard to get one there when your cash flow stinks to begin with and it's still hard to really make any money when you take into account the cost of raising one to 3 years old and training fees.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul. 14, 2004
    Location
    Virginia. We Do Ponies!
    Posts
    11,697

    Default

    So many variables involved (quality of stock, pedigree, reputation of breeder, past experiences and history of animals) and extremely doubtful you'll get anyone to disclose their selling prices.
    Randee Beckman ~Otteridge Farm, LLC (http://on.fb.me/1iJEqvR)~ Marketing Manager - The Clothes Horse



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug. 28, 2003
    Location
    WV
    Posts
    1,561

    Default foals selling

    More foals sell when people come to see older horses or just to look, then fall in love with a cute fuzzy face. It doesn't pay to advertize them unless you want to play the cute factor to generate interest, as in a photo collage of all ages. You'll get a better price too when someone has already "decided" in person on that special foal.
    http://TouchstoneAcres.com
    Touchstone Acres Lipizzans, Standing N. Samira VI (Gray), N. XXIX-18(Black), more in 2014



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec. 14, 2006
    Location
    Quebec (Canada)
    Posts
    802

    Default

    Ditto, I've just sold a long yearling filly out of a premium mare for way under her what she would have sold 3 years ago if I compare to her 1/2 sister out of the same mare who sold as a 2 months old for practically twice the price.

    People will say real value is the money the market is willing to pay for, but if it's going to be the same for years to come, I better stop breeding because prices like this dont even make breeders break even. I'm happy as tht filly went to a good loving home, who will train and show her later, well aware that she was a steal at this price, so not all is lost, but it becomes harder and harder to sell foals and even when selling, prices are bad.

    We had a big self questionning episode my husband and I and the coming years should be different for us in terms of breeding goals in order to breed more sellable babies, or at least, that commands better prices as weanlings. But taking such turn takes time. And will we be able to hang on until then?

    Some people says the key is to wait until they are u/s, but I wonder if making 500$ to 1000$ profit on a weanling by selling him/her 6000$ is better/safer than making 3k on a 3yo by selling him 18k green broke, or even 5k on a 25k 4 to 5 yo youngster with show mileage. If it sells and reaches this age without any problem. It's the russian roulette game.
    Les Écuries d'Automne, Québec, Canada
    Visit EdA's Facebook page!



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct. 21, 2003
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    8,659

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tiki View Post
    People just don't want to pay for 3 years board on an animal they can't ride. Foals also cannot just be boarded at a riding stable either.
    This, exactly. As someone who would love nothing more than to write a big check for a super, duper foal. Paying several hundred a month for a horse I won't see for several years (because there really is nowhere nearby to board one in a proper environment) would just suck.

    I don't think it's the prices that are the problem, it's more a supply-demand problem.

    I hope those of you with nice acreage realize every single day just how lucky you are. I would give just about anything to be in your shoes. Unfortunately it would mean giving up the ONE thing I refuse to (my husband, lol).



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug. 19, 2003
    Location
    Citra, Fl, USA
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    1,878

    Default

    I actually find alot of people willing to buy a foal (or youngster)...but the last two years or so have seen my prices drop by a third and it take much longer for a sale. 2-3 years ago I would have already sold all my youngsters. However, U/S sales arent what they used to be either....
    Whispered Wish Weser-Ems: Breeding quality German Riding Ponies!
    Standing the stallion Burberry
    www.germanridingpony.com
    www.facebook.com/HighlifesBurberry



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan. 26, 2009
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    603

    Default

    So to sum up, seems like there are too many foals and people want too much than the market can handle for the ones they have.

    Wonder if stallion prices went UP across the board if foal/horse prices would go up as well.... course.. no stallion owner is going to do that alone since that would put them out of the running to some breeders who will just go to someone else.

    What stallions do the foals that sell seem to be by and what discipline? Hunter babies seem to be selling more around where I am, but then again that is pretty much the majority of what is here!



  12. #12
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    Jan. 28, 2002
    Location
    Alberta, Canada
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by hluing View Post
    I actually find alot of people willing to buy a foal (or youngster)...but the last two years or so have seen my prices drop by a third and it take much longer for a sale. 2-3 years ago I would have already sold all my youngsters. However, U/S sales arent what they used to be either....
    I agree with this, and this has been my experience the last couple of years. Our gorgeous 2010 buckskin sabino Section B Welsh Pony colt was Canadian National Champion in 2010 and is destined to be a fancy pony hunter prospect. Two or three years ago, before the economy crashed, I likely could have sold him quite easily for 10-12K. I've currently got him priced at $4,000 CAD and still no takers
    www.DaventryEquestrian.com
    Home of Welsh Pony, ISR/Oldenburg & RPSI stallions Daventry's Power Play, Goldhills Brandysnap LOM & Alvesta Picasso
    Also home to www.EquineAppraisers.com



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Mar. 17, 2006
    Location
    Sunbury, NC
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    1,789

    Default

    I agree that supply has boomed in the past 2-3 years. When we first started, there were very few foals available and they sold quickly for good money. This past summer, I went on Equine.com and searched on 2010 foals with WB breeding and there were 150+ advertised (of course of various qualities). It's definitely a supply-demand issue and the economy on top of it makes it doubly bad. As folks cut back due to these factors, it will hopefully level out.

    I will say that 90% of our foals who sell prior to/at weaning have sold to folks who have their own farms.

    We sold 4 out of 5 foals this year which was pleasantly surprising to me considering the market; we anticipated keeping many more than that but were pleased. Lots of marketing is key, but unfortunately also costs too.
    Signature Sporthorses
    www.signaturesporthorses.com



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jan. 21, 2003
    Location
    Charles Town, WV
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    Default

    So to sum up, seems like there are too many foals and people want too much than the market can handle for the ones they have.

    Wonder if stallion prices went UP across the board if foal/horse prices would go up as well.... course.. no stallion owner is going to do that alone since that would put them out of the running to some breeders who will just go to someone else.
    WHOA there. How on earth did you make that jump???? If you don't have foals, you won't have horses under saddle. The problem isn't the number of foals, it's the fact that people don't want to/can't board out a foal and wait until it grows up if they're expecting to have a horse to ride NOW, so it all falls on the breeders to bring them up and get them under saddle.

    And the 2nd part of your statement about higher stud fees should bring higher prices for foals??? Foals bring whatever price they bring because of quality and potential, not because of price of the semen. The stud fee is (in general) the cheapest part of breeding.
    Tranquility Farm - Proud breeder of Born in the USA Sport Horses, and Cob-sized Warmbloods
    Now apparently completely invisible!



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Oct. 21, 2003
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    8,659

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tiki View Post
    WHOA there. How on earth did you make that jump???? If you don't have foals, you won't have horses under saddle. The problem isn't the number of foals, it's the fact that people don't want to/can't board out a foal and wait until it grows up if they're expecting to have a horse to ride NOW, so it all falls on the breeders to bring them up and get them under saddle.
    I would add that also a big part of it is people cutting back their expenses. Where someone might have a riding horse AND a foal to bring along, more and more people cannot do that anymore. As board costs go up (my board has gone up $150/month in the past 2 years) and availability of pasture/young horse boarding options decline, it is not economically feasible to have 2-3 horses for most people. It's also difficult to find homes for horses that are older, pasture pets, or light riding horses, so those horses stay on people's payrolls.

    So it boils down to less available homes for the number of horses available.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jul. 6, 2007
    Posts
    125

    Default

    I am going to be interested to see what prices for under saddle horses are in another 3 years. Lots of people I know that were breeding 1 -10 foals a year are now breeding 0 - 3.

    What this means to me in the long term is that there may be a shortage of riding age horses of quality in three years, hopefully as the economy is doing better. So were I in the position to breed nice babies and keep them to 3 or 4 and get them started, it might be a very hot market in a few years.

    Even the TB breeders seem to be cutting back, and many small tracks are shrinking, so it's possible the supply of cheap TB's will be more competitive also.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Oct. 2, 2007
    Location
    Mirabel, QC
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    2,656

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tiki View Post
    I don't even advertise foals anymore. People just don't want to pay for 3 years board on an animal they can't ride. Foals also cannot just be boarded at a riding stable either. Takes knowledge to bring them up right. I just wait until they are under saddle. Basically, it seems that only someone very knowledgeable of what you have, who has the ability and space to raise them, who knows that they are taking a chance on a possible 'great one' for a bargain price and gets to raise it themselves, or another breeder, is interested in foals these days.
    Ditto.

    I have changed my breeding plans to a model that allows me to keep my foals until they are under saddle, even if green green broke.

    Selling foals is an uphill battle (that is often lost) for this very reason. What to do with them in the meantime? Very few people have the physical means and the experience to buy a foal and raise to become a decent citizen.

    Plus, it is better for my breeding program to control the future of the foals a bit... So many horses are sold as foals to, good homes indeed, but non-competitive homes. While those homes are not "bad" per say, they are problematic when one is trying to build up their program and reputation.
    www.EquusMagnificus.ca
    Breeding & Sales - Currently: Eventing & Derby prospects
    Facebook | YouTube |Twitter | LinkedIn



  18. #18
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    Apr. 3, 2003
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    Up the creek from bar.ka
    Posts
    10,025

    Default

    Funny you all write such things. I am shopping for a nice WB between weanling and 4 years old unbroke with good breeding and I'm not finding much of anything to look at.

    Are you people just not advertising? Buyers like me...well I don't know the breeders by name and I hate looking through websites of breeders. -see next post for details on what I was really trying to say!

    So I go on Warmbloods-for-sale.com horseclicks, equine.com etc and there isn't much out there.

    Care to steer me to some colts or geldings in my age range?



  19. #19
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    Apr. 3, 2003
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    Up the creek from bar.ka
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    Default

    Let me qualify my statement... I love looking at breeders websites... I just don't like googling and then having to sort through the 3 million results that come back that are not appropriate and I have to navigate through 4 pages of the website to get to a horse I'm interested in only to find it has sold.



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Oct. 21, 2003
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    8,659

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    Quote Originally Posted by tidy rabbit View Post
    Funny you all write such things. I am shopping for a nice WB between weanling and 4 years old unbroke with good breeding and I'm not finding much of anything to look at.
    Really?! Goodness, there are so many nice horses out there in the 1-3 year old range.

    Here is a good place to start to find some good breeders

    http://www.hilltopfarminc.com/sales_...offerings.html
    http://www.hilltopfarminc.com/sales_...offerings.html

    Contact some of the stallion owners of horses you like, they often have offspring, or are in touch with breeders with offspring for sale.



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