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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep. 27, 2006
    Location
    N FL
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    746

    Default Why is it so hard to find a good husband horse?

    I have been looking for a horse for my husband, he wants a draft cross. I have been scouring the internet and nothing in my range of two hundred miles, that isn't 20,000!!! I remember when you could pick up a draft cross for very little money. AM I looking in the wrong place?



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar. 9, 2006
    Location
    Lucama, NC
    Posts
    5,868

    Default

    You can get a draft cross, or any horse for little to no money. But NT ones that are safe, quiet, well broke and sound! Those horses hold their value, even in tough economic times, because that is what EVERYONE wants! I do a lot of marketing and the good ones sell quickly and for the asking price, and if they don't, the owner is not as likely to negotiate as someone with a more "undesirable" horse.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr. 28, 2004
    Location
    Saratoga Springs, NY
    Posts
    4,555

    Default

    I've got a few husband horses, including a draft. They aren't for sale. They're worth too much to us. I can use them for lessons, the draft is half of a nice driving team, my better half or one of our kids can go trail riding if they want, and I don't have to worry. So yeah, 20k sounds pretty reasonable! Lol. Sorry, but that 'type' can be really worth their weight in gold to the people who have them. Where are you located? The guy our draft mare came from might have something that could work for you.....

    ETA: saw you're in FL. Vt is probably too far. Have you called any draft breeding farms and told them what you're looking for? Somebody always knows somebody.... And keep in mind, a lot of driving horses have been ridden before, even if they aren't being advertised as such, and the transition from driving to riding can be pretty easy for a horse with the right temperment.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr. 28, 2008
    Posts
    7,361

    Default

    Finding a horse that I would actually want to put my husband on -- worth its weight in gold. They are hard to find and often not inexpensive, like a kid's pony.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    May. 7, 2006
    Posts
    56

    Default

    These people seem to get alot of nice draft cross husband horses in and they sell pretty quickly. Here is one they have for sale.

    http://www.dreamhorse.com/show_horse...5&share_this=Y

    This is where I will be going to get my husbands horse when he is truly ready to commit to riding.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep. 27, 2006
    Location
    N FL
    Posts
    746

    Default

    Would you buy from a place that, I hate to use the word horse broker, but they basically specialize in making horses as bomb proof as possible. They train them for field hunting and trail riding. They are usually in the 5-9,000 range. I'm just for some reason scared of those places, they do guarantee their horses for a year that they are what they say they are. So should I go look there? Plus they are only an hour from our house.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr. 28, 2004
    Location
    Saratoga Springs, NY
    Posts
    4,555

    Default

    It can't hurt to take a look, being that close. And do your due diligence, same with any horse purchase. Good luck!



  8. #8

    Default

    I always see drafts and draft crosses at those kill auction yards. Do you really have to train a draft? Aren't they just born bomb proof?



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct. 15, 2010
    Posts
    598

    Default

    If safe and sound they are worth their weight in gold. I have two paints, I raised one, the other is the dam, I've had her 15 years, not drafts although someday I want a draft cross. I may breed her to a RID. They are not for sale because they are priceless. I can put anyone, any age one them.
    I did the husband horse search for my Ex-husband. Must have gone through a dozen. I could get along fine but not safe enough for a beginner, it's so hard to find those patient, rock solid, saintly horses.
    The two I have now are packing husband and brother, rank beginners, on fox-hunts, which the horses have never done themselves, and going in the first flight without blinking an eye at anything. They are also being used to give lessons to my grandkids, age 5-10.
    Good luck in your search. Perhaps broaden your breeds and age range?



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar. 21, 2006
    Posts
    1,090

    Default

    We were looking for a drafty horse for husband and wound up with a sturdy twh. She is not tall at about 15.3 but she wears a draft saddle and easily carries my husband around. She has a very easy canter,one of the nicest of any horse I've ridden.
    So maybe look at other breeds or crosses.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Apr. 6, 2010
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    2,084

    Default

    I placed my OTTB husband horse. He was 16.2 and narrow so not for the substantial hubby but perfect for the long and lean type. He recently was in a parade and had blinking Christmas lights on him. If I had the money I would have kept him as he would have been perfect for the lesson program here. Yes hang onto the hubbie horses as they really are worth their weight in gold.
    Adoring fan of A Fine Romance
    Originally Posted by alicen:
    What serious breeder would think that a horse at that performance level is push button? Even so, that's still a lot of buttons to push.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Mar. 7, 2008
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    86

    Default

    Just want to say you can't assume a draft or draft cross is automatically bomb-proof. I have one (Belgian-TB mare) and she is quiet, but very spooky! Please convince the hubby that a good horse is a good horse, no matter what the breeding. Some TB's could definitely fit the bill, while some drafts definitely wouldn't. I understand liking the drafts (otherwise I guess I wouldn't have one!) but the best horse I had that anyone could ride, kids, grownups of all abilities, worth his weight in gold, was an off the ranch quarter horse. I miss him still, he was put down last summer.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Nov. 3, 2010
    Posts
    45

    Default

    Try a lesson barn? I got my hubby's horse from a lesson barn with WAY too many horses. We ended up with an old (think, ancient, but still sound!) mare that was extremely ring sour. Hubby does most of his riding on the trails. Problem solved! Mare gets to do something besides circles, and hubby gets a been there, done that horse.

    I was a bit weary about buying a 20 year old horse, but she's been more sound than my competition horse! And mine is always getting into trouble.... I think The Old One will outlive mine.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Dec. 21, 2008
    Location
    Missouri
    Posts
    2,190

    Default

    I think you should try to change your hubby's mind on a draft cross ( only) and you may have luck. There are so many other breeds that can give you the "bigness" he is probably wanting. Some AQHA horses are huge and not totally muscle bound and are pretty easy to find.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jul. 14, 2003
    Location
    Charlotte, NC, USA
    Posts
    551

    Default

    We did pretty much what Pintosrock said. Hubby's first horse was 18+ when we got her. We re-homed her this year to my dressage instructor for her MIL. THEY LOVE HER. Their care is better than ours and I am anal. So if you get a great oldie and network you will be able to find them a home if/when it is time for the next hubby horse. Really I didnt believe that myself but once we decided that it was no longer fair to hubby's first horse for him to keep riding her as he is a big guy and likes to ride once a week for several hours (3+) out on at times hard terrain and moving out, we had folks coming out of the wood work because the mare is a saint but fun.
    Then like yellow horse said we ended up with another gaited horse. We wanted a draft cross but really everything I saw middle age, sound, big, trust worthy was $5k. The new gaited horse is 16.1 maybe 16.2 and big boned. He is a saint but with a spook (honest about it but still) and not much motor so makes the hubby work a little harder so he can learn and grow. I dont really do gaited horses and this boy is fun to ride.
    My hubby is 6ft 2" and about 250+/- so ........
    Pamela Ellis



  16. #16

    Default

    I second networking over scouring the internet. These great horses are often beloved and their owners to do not easily part with them to strangers.

    I don't know what your husband has in mind to do with his horse, his riding abilities, nor his size. But we found a very nice "husband horse" for my DH through our trainer and barn owner. DH is 5'11", about 190 lbs, medium build. Never ridden horses before, but a good athlete and willing to learn. (He is also 64 years old!)

    Our barn owner had a stocky-built little Arabian gelding, 14 years old. Pretty little guy with a terrific work ethic and unflappable. He has a little flash to him, and is a lot of fun -- but a real Steady Eddie. He's a cowboy's horse type.

    Because she knew us, liked us, knew the horse would have a great home, she approached us about buying him. She offered him to us at a very reasonable price (under $2k), but only because she was certain he would have a great, loving home.

    He is one that would have never been listed for sale on the internet. He was never actually "for sale," until barn owner thought to herself, "Hey, Rocky would be great for them!" It was that sort of a deal.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Oct. 27, 2010
    Location
    Nevada
    Posts
    2,561

    Default

    Networking will work better for you most likely. Horses that are husband or kid safe are seldom on the internet as they are most often found new homes by word of mouth. Same thing with good 4-H horses...they go to people who know about them and are known by the current owners many times. I agree that looking at other breeds will make your search easier....out here retired ranch geldings are always in demand for instance....they can no longer do 12 hours up and down mountains and canyons but are fine for trail riding and they've seen everything out there that can/should spook 'em. Some of the bloodlines in QH's that make bigger bone and strong horses for packing around larger folks are the Hancocks and the Driftwoods and the Blue Valentines....these are lines used largely for roping, bull dogging and such so have some size to them. Retired ropers are also a possibility...some get soured of being used for this but are terrific for packing on trails.



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Oct. 14, 2004
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    9,023

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by candyappy View Post
    I think you should try to change your hubby's mind on a draft cross ( only) and you may have luck. There are so many other breeds that can give you the "bigness" he is probably wanting. Some AQHA horses are huge and not totally muscle bound and are pretty easy to find.
    Exactly - A pretty much bombproof (and I hate to use that term) is hard enough to find, never mind narrowing it to a specific breed.

    He might have to expand his horizons a bit to find the right horse.

    When I was looking for my unflappable trail horse, which are hard to find, I didn't care if it had 3 ears as long as it was trustworthy and sound.

    I did eventually find her... But I looked at all breeds. Quiet should be the number one factor on hubby's wish list. Good luck.



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Nov. 1, 2008
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    997

    Default

    Found ours (and he's a draft cross) on dreamhorse.com. HOWEVER, he wasn't trained to much of anything...he was supposedly a great trail horse but the owner got on and he did nothing but back up! I could tell he had a kind eye, so I took the huge hulking bit out of his mouth and rode him in a halter. Bought him for $2500 and put a year of riding into him before he was deemed a "husband horse". Now...he is phenomenal - anyone can ride him - and of course not for sale - that is why you are having a hard time finding them! Good luck and be patient. It took us over a year of looking to find HIM and we ended up driving 7 hours from home....
    JB-Infinity Farm
    www.infinitehorses.com



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Sep. 27, 2006
    Location
    N FL
    Posts
    746

    Default

    He is open to other breeds, his dream horse is a draft or draft cross. We just lost our bomb proof off the ranch QH, he was my dad's horse and was perfect for anyone to ride. Unfortunately we think he had cancer and passed away on us. We are open to walkers, QHs or what ever they just have to be safe. I figured we would be able to get one for around 5k, so we will just keep looking I'm in no hurry.



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