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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May. 28, 2006
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    Default Help! I broke math and started my turkey too early...

    Waiting until you're half asleep in bed to determine start times for your bird is NOT a wise idea! I woke up this morning, had two sips of coffee, prepped the bird and threw it in the oven. Sat back, finished coffee, started wondering how 8:00am + 4 hours equals 1:00pm.

    It doesn't.

    10lb turkey
    electric oven
    recipe usually takes 4 hours at 325degrees.

    I've bumped it down to 300, hoping that it will finish up closer to 1:00. Think that will end up ok? I do have a thermometer that I will be using. I swear I tried to Google this, but no luck! Save tott's family Thanksgiving, COTH!



  2. #2
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    Sep. 8, 2012
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    Just so long as the oven does not lock and you can get the bird out you will be fine!

    Kim


    14 members found this post helpful.

  3. #3
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    Oct. 3, 2012
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    I would just take it out of the oven when it's done. You don't want to dry it out too much. Four hours seems like a long time for such a small turkey, so maybe watch the thermometer.
    A helmet saved my life.

    2014 goal: learn to ride like TheHorseProblem, er, a barn rat!


    1 members found this post helpful.

  4. #4
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    12th floor of the Acme building in a city that knows how to keep it's secrets.
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by kimkatsooo View Post
    Just so long as the oven does not lock and you can get the bird out you will be fine!

    Kim
    LOL!!! One of the best threads ever!
    *****
    You will not rise to the occasion, you will default to your level of training.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep. 5, 1999
    Location
    Central FL
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    4,495

    Default

    No panicking!
    First, what time are you actually EATING?
    Turkeys need to sit 20-30 min before cutting.



  6. #6
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    Sep. 7, 2009
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    Lexington, KY
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    Call 1-800-Butterball. 300 degrees may be so low that it allow the bacteria to multiply. I'm not sure. I do know my mother used to cook a turkey all night at some ridiculously low temperature and shockingly we all ended up with a "stomach virus" the next day.
    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." ~Immanuel Kant



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar. 5, 2013
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    771

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    4 hours seems like a lot for a 10 lb turkey to me also. One of the options discussed for our Thanksgoving this year was to cook the turkey the day before, carve it and then reheat the pieces. If your turkey is done too early, this may be a way to compensate. Another benefit is that you free up some time and some of the mess can be cleaned up before guests arrive.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb. 9, 2006
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    1,780

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by talkofthetown View Post
    Waiting until you're half asleep in bed to determine start times for your bird is NOT a wise idea! I woke up this morning, had two sips of coffee, prepped the bird and threw it in the oven. Sat back, finished coffee, started wondering how 8:00am + 4 hours equals 1:00pm.

    It doesn't.

    10lb turkey
    electric oven
    recipe usually takes 4 hours at 325degrees.

    I've bumped it down to 300, hoping that it will finish up closer to 1:00. Think that will end up ok? I do have a thermometer that I will be using. I swear I tried to Google this, but no luck! Save tott's family Thanksgiving, COTH!
    Drop the temp a bit further, to 250, and you're going to end up with the best turkey ever - here are detailed instructions:

    http://www.howtocookathanksgivingturkey.com


    3 members found this post helpful.

  9. #9
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    Sep. 7, 2009
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    Lexington, KY
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    Quote Originally Posted by Romany View Post
    Drop the temp a bit further, to 250, and you're going to end up with the best turkey ever - here are detailed instructions:

    http://www.howtocookathanksgivingturkey.com
    No, no, no! Call 1-800-Butterball. 250 degrees and you are taking a huge chance on food poisoning. If you do cook the turkey at a temperature lower than 325, please alert your guests so they can choose whether or not they want to take a chance on getting sick.

    Instead of lowering the oven temperature, here's how to keep it safely warm after it's cooked:

    • If you need to keep a cooked turkey hot or warm for a longer period of time, food scientist Dr. Catherine Cutter offers the following advice: Don’t carve the bird before the guests arrive. Keeping it whole will keep the cooked poultry meat from drying out. Cover it with foil, and put it in a 200°F oven with a pan of water on the bottom of the oven to keep the bird moist. Even if you choose to ignore Cutter’s expert advice and carve the bird before your company comes, the oven-plus-water technique and covering the poultry meat with foil will help to keep the turkey both warm and moist.

    http://shelflifeadvice.com/content/y...ng-dinner-warm
    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." ~Immanuel Kant



  10. #10
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    Nov. 1, 2007
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    Tampa Fl.
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    You will be fine. The bird has to rest for 20-30 mins before you carve.


    Return it to the proper temp so you don't get anyone sick ( that is more important than a turkey that is done too early).

    Rest the bird, then carve it after 30 mins, place it all together so it says as warm as it can, then make sure your sides, gravy, etc are nice and hot! They will warm the turkey back up.

    If it cools down too much, place carved bird pieces back into a warm oven, but I would cover with foil so it doesn't dry out.

    Your math was right, you just forget to allow for resting and carving. Having it done at 12 is spot on!


    2 members found this post helpful.

  11. #11
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    Nov. 1, 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by Romany View Post
    Drop the temp a bit further, to 250, and you're going to end up with the best turkey ever - here are detailed instructions:

    http://www.howtocookathanksgivingturkey.com
    if you read the directions, she starts it at 475* and then drops it. OP did NOT start at 475* she will make her guests sick if she drops it down now. She needs to bring it back up and just keep cooking it at the proper temp. The turkey needs to reach 160* at least ( it will hit 165* while its resting, waiting to be carved).


    2 members found this post helpful.

  12. #12
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    May. 28, 2006
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    Ok, not panicking! Temp is back up, oven is not locked and Turkey's none the wiser. And really, no one will complain about eating EARLIER than expected! I was mostly concerned about bacteria, and what to do with it until time to eat.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by talkofthetown View Post
    Ok, not panicking! .
    This made me laugh. All I can think about now is the chicken in the oven!



  14. #14
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    Feb. 9, 2006
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    OK, 275 then. Seriously, if one uses a meat thermometer, one is perfectly safe cooking a turkey at slightly lower temperatures. It's how we cook ours, and - same old, same old - ymmv, etc - we're fine. jmho!

    Here's another example of slow-roasting, only with this recipe you end up with a high temperature, to brown the skin, vs starting out with a high temperature: http://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2...vy-recipe.html

    Willy-nilly, I'm sure the OP's bird will be delicious - use a meat thermometer, baste well, tent well (towel over aluminum foil over the bird), and have your sides and your plates and your serving dishes piping hot.



  15. #15
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    Jul. 29, 2004
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    Quote Originally Posted by LauraKY View Post
    No, no, no! Call 1-800-Butterball. 250 degrees and you are taking a huge chance on food poisoning.
    FWIW, I don't call Butterball, I don't do Butterball turkeys. I dry brine my 10lb turkey then smoke it for about 5+ hours at 225-250 and it turns out just fine with wonderful flavor every year.

    I also am a heretic and smoke it breast down so the dark meat in the legs is "on top" and I end up with nice juicy white meat.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Where'sMyWhite View Post
    FWIW, I don't call Butterball, I don't do Butterball turkeys. I dry brine my 10lb turkey then smoke it for about 5+ hours at 225-250 and it turns out just fine with wonderful flavor every year.

    I also am a heretic and smoke it breast down so the dark meat in the legs is "on top" and I end up with nice juicy white meat.
    I don't do Butterball turkeys either...they will help anyone who calls with any brand of bird, using any cooking method.
    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." ~Immanuel Kant



  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Romany View Post
    OK, 275 then. Seriously, if one uses a meat thermometer, one is perfectly safe cooking a turkey at slightly lower temperatures. It's how we cook ours, and - same old, same old - ymmv, etc - we're fine. jmho!

    Here's another example of slow-roasting, only with this recipe you end up with a high temperature, to brown the skin, vs starting out with a high temperature: http://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2...vy-recipe.html

    Willy-nilly, I'm sure the OP's bird will be delicious - use a meat thermometer, baste well, tent well (towel over aluminum foil over the bird), and have your sides and your plates and your serving dishes piping hot.
    No, it's not safe. It's just not safe to cook a turkey at temperatures below 325.
    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." ~Immanuel Kant


    1 members found this post helpful.

  18. #18
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    Sep. 13, 2000
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    Greenville, MI,
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    Should be 325 degrees for 4 hours for a 10 lb bird.
    Don't mess with it. Cover it, so as not to dry out.
    You will need it to sit for a half hour before carving. while you do your sides.
    You will be fine. Don;t go screwing with the temp. 325!
    "you can only ride the drama llama so hard before it decides to spit in your face." ?Caffeinated.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  19. #19
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    Hahaha, from the CDC, at least you don't have to worry about catching Ebola from your turkey!

    A Note About Ebola

    On November 10, 2014, a fictitious, comedic article was published online claiming that turkeys on a farm in Texas were infected with Ebola. This is a false claim. Furthermore, experimental efforts to infect birds with Ebola virus have not been successful, and birds have never been implicated in the transmission of Ebola. Only a few species of mammals, including humans, bats, monkeys, and apes, have been shown to be capable of becoming infected with and transmitting Ebola.

    There is no danger of getting Ebola from handling or eating any food produced in the United States. Ebola is spread through direct contact with the blood or body fluids of a person who is sick with Ebola or someone who has died from Ebola. In some African countries, human Ebola infections have been associated with hunting, butchering, and handling bushmeat from animals infected with the Ebola virus. "Bushmeat" refers to meat that comes from wild animals, such as bats and monkeys, captured in developing regions of the world such as Africa. It is illegal to bring bushmeat into the U.S. Because of this, bushmeat, in any amount, found at U.S. ports of entry is destroyed along with any personal items that may have come in contact with it.


    Are Americans really stupid enough to believe that turkeys were infected with Ebola? I suppose the answer is yes. Sigh.

    http://www.cdc.gov/features/turkeytime/
    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." ~Immanuel Kant



  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by LauraKY View Post
    No, it's not safe. It's just not safe to cook a turkey at temperatures below 325.
    Just don't tell that to all the people who smoke their turkeys...

    And yes, the meat itself does get to the correct internal temperature. I don't like undercooked poultry.


    1 members found this post helpful.

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