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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug. 14, 2009
    Posts
    133

    Default Hock Sores/Rubs - Can I Use Neoprene Hock Boots?

    Title is somewhat says it . . . my horse has bad hock rubs that we can't seem to stop (and therefore heal).

    His stall has a rubber matted bottom and is deeply bedded. In fact, the barn manager has been "extra bedding" his already well bedded stall for months now trying to allow the hock sores to heal. For months now, my horse has had his stall bedded about a foot and a half deep.

    Other than in the winter, my horse lives out from late afternoon until early morning and is only in the stall during the day.

    However, regardless of whether it is during the period when he is mostly living out, or during the winter when he is only out during the daylight and in the rest of the time, he has hock sores. It doesn't seem to matter: in or out, he has hock sores. Open scabby hock sores on both sides.

    We are at a loss as to what is causing them or how to stop them. He is the only horse in the barn of 15 horses with any sort of hock sores so this is particularly frustrating.

    We have tried various ointments, creams, powders, etc. but nothing seems to heal them.

    We are now wondering about putting those neoprene (not magnetic) hock boots on him to get them healed up. Has anyone ever done that successfully. I would expect that he'd have to wear them 24/7 (obviously except when being groomed or ridden) - would that be a problem?



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan. 9, 2009
    Location
    a little north of Columbus GA
    Posts
    1,844

    Default

    I wouldn't put a neoprene boot over a sore. Creating a warm moist environment sounds like a recipe for infection.

    My Appy used to get hock sores no matter how deep his stall was bedded -- he'd roll outside on the hard packed ground (Arizona) and scrape them.

    I got them under control with plain old duct tape. Tear duct tape into strips and make an X over the sore. Keep layering it on, offsetting a little so you stick to a few more hairs on the edge, until he doesn't wear through it. Eventually it will come un-stuck and you can start over.

    Yes, he will look funny with duct tape stuck to his legs. But it works.

    (You can put a bit of gauze or moleskin right over the sore if you want, but it didn't seem to matter either way and I stopped doing it.)
    --
    Wendy
    ... and Patrick



  3. #3
    Join Date
    May. 29, 2009
    Location
    Beautiful Colorado
    Posts
    169



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov. 9, 2005
    Location
    uk
    Posts
    15,268

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by alterknowbetter View Post
    Title is somewhat says it . . . my horse has bad hock rubs that we can't seem to stop (and therefore heal).

    His stall has a rubber matted bottom and is deeply bedded. In fact, the barn manager has been "extra bedding" his already well bedded stall for months now trying to allow the hock sores to heal. For months now, my horse has had his stall bedded about a foot and a half deep.

    Other than in the winter, my horse lives out from late afternoon until early morning and is only in the stall during the day.

    However, regardless of whether it is during the period when he is mostly living out, or during the winter when he is only out during the daylight and in the rest of the time, he has hock sores. It doesn't seem to matter: in or out, he has hock sores. Open scabby hock sores on both sides.


    We are at a loss as to what is causing them or how to stop them. He is the only horse in the barn of 15 horses with any sort of hock sores so this is particularly frustrating.

    We have tried various ointments, creams, powders, etc. but nothing seems to heal them.

    We are now wondering about putting those neoprene (not magnetic) hock boots on him to get them healed up. Has anyone ever done that successfully. I would expect that he'd have to wear them 24/7 (obviously except when being groomed or ridden) - would that be a problem?

    she need to bank his sides of his stable and not just have deeper bed his sides need doing aswell by about 2ft out and 2ft deep , use clay for his hock if still spongey can get it from naf naf it doesnt need bandages



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct. 22, 2001
    Posts
    5,085

    Default

    Also, next time your vet is out, you might ask whether your guy might need his hocks done. In my experience, and excuse the wordplay, but horses start getting hock sores when their hocks start getting sore. Meaning they are a little more ouchy getting up, and so they scramble a bit more, and they are more likely to open up the hock sores.

    For treating already existing ones, I use the alum-spray or nu-skin to form a barrier (never had good luck with hock boots, and found they instead tend to keep the sore open/gooey, rather than healing). But usually, with mine, anyway, once they got their hocks injected the hock sores went away on their own.



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