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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct. 21, 2003
    Posts
    8,672

    Default It's official, you all have cured me

    Just wanted to say that my time on the breeding forum has not been spent in vain. I have absolutely no desire to ever breed a horse. I will now focus on my dream of someday raising a foal that has been bred by someone who truly knows what they are doing, and has a history of success.

    My only hope is that more newbies wander into this forum and stick around long enough to learn that they too should leave the horse breeding to experienced breeders with good stock, and support them with their business.

    The horses of the world will thank you



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec. 16, 2003
    Location
    Staunton, VA, USA
    Posts
    2,487

    Default Think of the fun you will have

    foal shopping! It can be such fun, you get to go around various farms and check ut all their babies and ohh and ahh over them.
    ANd you can pick the gender, color size and breeding that you want. Best of all, it actually won't cost you any more than actually breeding it, and you won't have to wait biting your nails for 11 months for that foal to appear!

    Much the best way to go.
    MW
    Melyni (PhD) PAS, Dipl. ACAN.
    Sign up for the Equine nutrition enewsletter on www.foxdenequine.com
    New edition of book is out:
    Horse Nutrition Handbook.

    www.knabstruppers4usa.com



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan. 17, 2008
    Posts
    2,076

    Default

    I agree!

    I learn so much here. I have learned that I have no interest in breeding. I will stick to my ottb thanks very much!!
    "look deep into his pedigree. Look for the name of a one-of-a-kind horse who lends to his kin a fierce tenacity, a will of iron, a look of eagles. Look & know that Slew is still very much with us."



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov. 4, 2003
    Location
    Dallas, Georgia
    Posts
    16,533

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Perfect Pony View Post
    Just wanted to say that my time on the breeding forum has not been spent in vain. I have absolutely no desire to ever breed a horse. I will now focus on my dream of someday raising a foal that has been bred by someone who truly knows what they are doing, and has a history of success.

    My only hope is that more newbies wander into this forum and stick around long enough to learn that they too should leave the horse breeding to experienced breeders with good stock, and support them with their business.

    The horses of the world will thank you
    I came to the same conclusion about 2 years ago from both reading this forum a wee bit AND having become friends with the owner of Golden Venture Farm. The tales from this forum and her convinced me that there is NO NEED to breed. I can get what I want out there somewhere.

    Best thing I've learned: IF, IF, IF you're going to breed, ONLY breed the Very Best TO The Very Best and Hope for The Best.
    <>< Sorrow Looks Back. Worry Looks Around. Faith Looks Up! -- "When they try to tell you these are your Golden years, don't believe 'em.... It's rust."



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov. 15, 2006
    Location
    Lexington, Kentucky
    Posts
    3,275

    Default

    I wouldn't trade my two homebreds for anything. I've enjoyed every second of planning them and raising them so far, and really looking forward to riding my coming 3yo.
    If it's what you want to do, do it. If it's not, don't.
    We're spending our money on horses and bourbon. The rest we're just wasting.
    www.dleestudio.com



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan. 31, 2003
    Posts
    18,472

    Default

    Me either! Last year I toyed with breeding ponies. Then I read all the tragic foaling stories. Faced up to the fact that I dont have what it takes to handle that stuff. My Helmet is off to you breeders!
    "Kindness is free" ~ Eurofoal
    ---
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr. 4, 2006
    Location
    An American Living In Ireland
    Posts
    5,658

    Default

    I don't put myself in the class of most of the breeders on here but I try hard to do the right thing by my horses. The tragedies are so difficult but you have so many good memories it's hard to focus on only the bad.

    My turning 5 year old will begin competing in the new year and I have so enjoyed watching her become what she was bred for. And I have one from this year which I bred for myself. So I am happy but I am only a hobby breeder. I have someone who's been asking me about breeding for next year. I told him straight if he can't afford to til it's at least 4 and doing a little something then don't bother. And then I said if you hope to make a big profit at that stage, again don't bother.

    Terri
    COTH, keeping popcorn growers in business for years.

    "I need your grace to remind me to find my own." Snow Patrol-Chasing Cars. This line reminds me why I have horses.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr. 6, 2010
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    2,084

    Default

    I've never wanted to be a breeder. I don't particularly like babies in any form but I LOVE reading all the successes and ooing and awwing over all the lovely foals on the forum. I'm in the come see me when you are undersaddle, sane, and done being an idiot camp. I would say not suicidal but I swear they really are on a mission and every day they live is another day to try again.
    Adoring fan of A Fine Romance
    Originally Posted by alicen:
    What serious breeder would think that a horse at that performance level is push button? Even so, that's still a lot of buttons to push.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb. 9, 2005
    Location
    Upper Midwest
    Posts
    5,640

    Default

    Well I'm just small (not even breeding next summer), but another reason beyond the monetary, the stress, and the heartbreak is that it is a bit like an obsession too (although maybe that's just me). Ugh. I already have my weanling's first boyfriend picked out (provided she meets my expectations and is good under-saddle)...and a strong contender for her second. But I will re-think this 1000 times in the next 3 years.

    And I'm secretly looking for another mare for all the studfees I have that I haven't used. Because she isn't perfect for these stallions and because of course that makes $ sense somehow. Mmmm.

    Oh and I need to buy a trailer that will work for hauling mares and foals and competition horses. Have that all picked out after much agonizing.

    I should probably stop boarding and buy a farm. And install really safe fencing...

    And on and on...
    Siouxland Sporthorses: http://slsfarm.blogspot.com/

    DIY Journey of Remodeling the Farmette: http://weownblackacre.blogspot.com/



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul. 17, 2006
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    1,102

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DLee View Post
    I wouldn't trade my two homebreds for anything. I've enjoyed every second of planning them and raising them so far, and really looking forward to riding my coming 3yo.
    If it's what you want to do, do it. If it's not, don't.
    Ditto this. Buying someone's else's weanling is all well and good, but it's just not the same.

    And LOL to the poster who thinks babies are insane idiots. You've been hanging around the wrong babies! I feel WAY safer handling/riding my youngsters than i do most aged horses - and have been injured/bucked off WAY more often riding the older experienced ones!!



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar. 7, 2009
    Posts
    448

    Default Wise woman!!

    Quote Originally Posted by Perfect Pony View Post
    Just wanted to say that my time on the breeding forum has not been spent in vain. I have absolutely no desire to ever breed a horse. I will now focus on my dream of someday raising a foal that has been bred by someone who truly knows what they are doing, and has a history of success.

    My only hope is that more newbies wander into this forum and stick around long enough to learn that they too should leave the horse breeding to experienced breeders with good stock, and support them with their business.
    The horses of the world will thank you
    You are very wise to have come to this conclusion and obviously not mentally lazy, to have done your research here. The odds are not in favor of success for breeders. For many of us its an addiction...But, many of us do work very, very hard at it and cull mercilessly to try to make an attractive, kind, useful/athletic and marketable animal that someone will love to peices!

    And yes, nothing is more fun than foal shopping. For me 1 have looked at 1,000 or more animals to buy one for my breeding program at times. And no I am not exaggerating. The internet has made this possible. But, I used to drive 600 miles to see a few and I flew across the county twice to buy one.

    Back to you..its a very good and fun thing to buy a foal or young horse. Happy hunting.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Mar. 7, 2009
    Posts
    448

    Default Unused breedings

    Quote Originally Posted by TrotTrotPumpkn View Post
    Well I'm just small (not even breeding next summer), but another reason beyond the monetary, the stress, and the heartbreak is that it is a bit like an obsession too (although maybe that's just me). Ugh. I already have my weanling's first boyfriend picked out (provided she meets my expectations and is good under-saddle)...and a strong contender for her second. But I will re-think this 1000 times in the next 3 years.

    And I'm secretly looking for another mare for all the studfees I have that I haven't used. Because she isn't perfect for these stallions and because of course that makes $ sense somehow. Mmmm.

    Oh and I need to buy a trailer that will work for hauling mares and foals and competition horses. Have that all picked out after much agonizing.

    I should probably stop boarding and buy a farm. And install really safe fencing...

    And on and on...
    If you dont really want to breed, try selling those breedings. Many stallion owners allow substitutions by reserve the right to approve, or will cooperate in a partnership. I did that on an unused one to Rubignon this year in fact.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Mar. 7, 2009
    Posts
    448

    Default Smart lady

    Quote Originally Posted by EqTrainer View Post
    Me either! Last year I toyed with breeding ponies. Then I read all the tragic foaling stories. Faced up to the fact that I dont have what it takes to handle that stuff. My Helmet is off to you breeders!
    Yes, its is a huge commitment. I even send some to the vet to foal if I have any reservations even though I am experienced..it costs a lot but I feel an obligation to do my best and its good business, but EXPENSIVE.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jun. 23, 2004
    Location
    Loudoun County, VA
    Posts
    10,412

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Gayle in Oregon View Post
    Yes, its is a huge commitment. I even send some to the vet to foal if I have any reservations even though I am experienced..it costs a lot but I feel an obligation to do my best and its good business, but EXPENSIVE.
    I do that, particularly with maiden mares. It is worth it, imo. We have only had one difficult foaling but would have lost my top mare and her foal if the vet had not been onsite. Instead mom and baby were fine.
    Roseknoll Sporthorses
    www.roseknoll.net



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Nov. 20, 2005
    Location
    missoula. mt
    Posts
    1,578

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by YankeeLawyer View Post
    I do that, particularly with maiden mares. It is worth it, imo. We have only had one difficult foaling but would have lost my top mare and her foal if the vet had not been onsite. Instead mom and baby were fine.
    Not to derail... but on the subject of sending your mare out to foal- how does one know the vet WILL be on site at all times? I worry about that! How does that work? It sounds like the ideal scenario if the vet IS actually there when he/she is needed. I'm considering this option with my maiden .
    And to the OP- You have a valid point as far as not breeding, but even the large and experienced breeders had to start somewhere! Yes, it's a crapshoot, and scary, but the reward makes it all worthwhile IMO!!!



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Apr. 6, 2010
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    2,084

    Default

    It's not that their insane when they are babies pre se (I have met some doozies) its the weanling wonderings, terrible threes and oopsie fours. Just when they get any kind of graceful they hit a growth spurt and its like watching a cartoon. I am a huge arab fan but am convinced they are just not right until they are at least 7 and then they are like a child hitting the age of reason. Those first 7 years though are just painful to watch (both on hilarity and sometimes literally) Lovely 4 y/o arab at the barn is just adorable to watch as he figures out his feet after a huge growth spurt only to readjust after the next one. I have enjoyed watching him grow up and thank my lucky stars every day that I only get to watch as he is just hell on his momma and trainer.
    Adoring fan of A Fine Romance
    Originally Posted by alicen:
    What serious breeder would think that a horse at that performance level is push button? Even so, that's still a lot of buttons to push.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Oct. 21, 2003
    Posts
    8,672

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by springer View Post
    And to the OP- You have a valid point as far as not breeding, but even the large and experienced breeders had to start somewhere! Yes, it's a crapshoot, and scary, but the reward makes it all worthwhile IMO!!!
    Oh, I am mostly talking about the ammy-hobby horsepeople who think their mare is wonderful because they LUV her and have some fantasy about having a baby (which I resembled...). I mostly came to the realization that 1. There are few mares out there that really should be bred and 2. There are already so many horses out there so why not give a home to something already alive instead of bringing another one into the world?

    But, I am also childless by choice for much the same reasons!



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Jun. 23, 2004
    Location
    Loudoun County, VA
    Posts
    10,412

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by springer View Post
    Not to derail... but on the subject of sending your mare out to foal- how does one know the vet WILL be on site at all times? !
    My vet lives onsite; he has a farm and clinic with a staff. The mares are monitored 24/7 by staff and via foal alert monitors and video cameras.
    Roseknoll Sporthorses
    www.roseknoll.net



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jun. 11, 2004
    Location
    Still here ~ not yet there
    Posts
    6,420

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by TrotTrotPumpkn View Post
    Well I'm just small (not even breeding next summer), but another reason beyond the monetary, the stress, and the heartbreak is that it is a bit like an obsession too (although maybe that's just me). Ugh. I already have my weanling's first boyfriend picked out (provided she meets my expectations and is good under-saddle)...and a strong contender for her second. But I will re-think this 1000 times in the next 3 years.

    And I'm secretly looking for another mare for all the studfees I have that I haven't used. Because she isn't perfect for these stallions and because of course that makes $ sense somehow. Mmmm.

    Oh and I need to buy a trailer that will work for hauling mares and foals and competition horses. Have that all picked out after much agonizing.

    I should probably stop boarding and buy a farm. And install really safe fencing...

    And on and on...
    NO -- it is totally NOT just you! It's "Breederitis," a total addiction. Like you, I am a relatively small breeder, although I've turned out some nice ones. But I've had the heartbreak to go along with it -- more than once.

    Over and over I've vowed to give it up, and as the years go by and I get older, and the work gets harder, and the money gets less ('cause it's a rare duck who can make a profit breeding horses over the long haul), that time gets closer.

    And I think I will just HATE it!! I love making the matches, I do love foals and working with them and making them into good little horsie citizens. And I love hearing from happy owners who brag to me about how "perfect" their horse is -- I feel like I had more than alittle to do with that outcome.

    It's a very satisfying feeling.

    And it IS addictive -- I've thought of starting a thread that asks the question to breeders:"What drives you on?" because sometimes I really wonder.

    There are those that get into breeding because the see the opportunity to cash in -- the "puppy mill" mindset, no matter what animal is being bred. But most of the COTHers I've seen tend to be pretty serious about their breeding and are striving to produce some quality.

    So what does make breeding so addictive, considering that for many of us (most of us, actually), it does not come free -- we pay for it monetarily and emotionally.

    Maybe it's a way to have "a plan" to see to fruition. Like TrotTrot, I find myself thinking of what the daughters of my foundation mares could produce with the right stallions! Swapping for a "foal back" option with a buyer of one of mares, when it will easily be 3-4 years from now before that "option" could even be born!! I don't even like to think how old I'm gonna be l.

    Shame on you PP -- you made me think!



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jun. 4, 2002
    Location
    Suffolk, VA
    Posts
    16,684

    Default

    I've had my share of tragedies now foaling as well as my share of the joy and I don't think I can give it up either. I faced my greatest fear/dread this past year...and orphan foal...and it turned out OK. It was very stressful and exhausting but in the end, I would have still done it. A certain wonderful mare helped and she's earned her spot in my heart forever.

    To me, this picture sums it up for me...

    http://i191.photobucket.com/albums/z.../IMG_9427b.jpg



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