The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Page 1 of 5 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 97
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec. 6, 2010
    Posts
    145

    Default Breed Ideas & Info

    Hi there,
    I am new to these forums, although I've read them for awhile. Hi everyone.

    My background with horses is extensive, and diverse. I have ridden hunters and jumpers on and off my whole life, retrained ex-racing TB's, rescued horses, owned & trained Arab show horses, and had several QH. However, last year after a series of HOT blooded Arabs and TB's I realized that I wanted a break from high high energy, hot spooky horses, didn't feel like showing much anymore, and really wanted to enjoy trails, horse camping, etc. I figured I'd try some playdays and some team sorting. In short, I just wanted to have FUN again...no more train train train, show show show. I was burnt out!

    I did some research and decided a Haflinger might be fun, known for their steady dispositions and good hooves, easy keepers, etc. I bought a Haflinger from a big breeder and would you believe...he was the worst horse I've ever owned. Not saying they all are, but he certainly was. In the 8 weeks I owned him he bucked me off, hard, 3 times. In June he broke my hip in 2 places and sent me to the ER. Multiple rods, screws, bolts, and 5 months of healing/rehab later, I am about ready to start riding again. Obviously I shipped him back to the breeder and am NOT interested in another. Imagine, all that after having 2 Arab show horses and 4 ex-racers in the course of a year and a half. Nasty pony!

    My goals remain the same: I want a fun trail horse, one that is comfortable to ride and a nice mover. Sensible, sane, good-legged and with good feet.

    I am a sucker for a pretty horse...the Haflinger wasn't quite my taste to be begin with.

    I figured here in the trails and endurance forums, I could get ideas and info on breeds I have not owned. I've owned most of the common breeds. But I am interested now in some gaited breeds...Peruvian Pasos and Paso Finos among them. After cracking my hip a smooth ride is suddenly more important!

    I would also consider another Arab although not of today's show lines...but I am not familiar with the endurance bloodlines.

    What other smooth, sane, sound and beautiful breeds are people riding on the trails these days? I definitely want an easy going horse, built to last, and fun to be around

    I'd love to hear from everyone! Anyone have Pasos or Paso Finos? I think I've ruled the TWH out...although I know they have lovely temperaments

    Thanks!
    Jenny



  2. #2

    Default

    Well, it's hard to beat a sane, smooth handy quarter horse! If you find a good one int he 15-hand range, you've got yourself a loyal, sane, sturdy pal for life.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec. 29, 2006
    Location
    Davie, FL
    Posts
    960

    Default Re: Breed Ideas & Info

    I'd have to vote for a Missouri Fox Trotter.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun. 23, 2006
    Location
    Vermont
    Posts
    3,585

    Default

    Icelandic?

    Hardy, sane little buggers.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    May. 25, 2009
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    164

    Default

    Sorry you had such a bad experience with Haflingers! We just "retired" my 12 yr. old daughters 13.2 Haffie gelding after he brought her through to pass her Pony Club D-3. She is now 5'6" and moving on to eventing so we had to find a horse. My 5 year old Haffie mare, who I backed myself, had a respectable turn out this year at the local judged pleasure rides. Sounds like you got the LEMON.

    I would second the recommendation for a smaller, foundation-type quarter horse.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov. 5, 2002
    Location
    way out west
    Posts
    3,128

    Default

    I've had Paints for 20 years, and will 'til the day I die.

    However, my trail riding friend has the cutest Norwegian Fjord mare. Honestly, she outwalks the others in our group, and she's sane and steady and so darned cute she's like a people magnet wherever we go. The rest of us sit on our very handsome Paints, Appy's and QH's, but no one ever gives us a second glance when the Fjord is there.

    My vet says as his clientele of middle aged women is getting older their horses are getting shorter. Food for thought, I guess.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun. 15, 2007
    Location
    The Goodland, CA
    Posts
    538

    Default

    That's too bad the Haffie didn't work out. They are great horses if you can get the right one. Mitch tests me from time to time, but glory, is he ever fun when he's in the right frame of mind. He can go all day. I can honestly say that my first choice for a trail horse would not have been a Haflinger, but this guy came up, and well the rest is history.

    It's too bad that yours didn't work out because I know of several who are doing exceptionally well in Southern California as trail horses -- my own Mitch being one of them. But I guess it takes a Haflinger with the right frame of mind. Sometimes Mitch really needs his butt kicked. He also needs to be mentally stimulated because he needs things to do all the time.

    You couldn't go wrong with a quiet Quarter Horse.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun. 11, 2004
    Location
    Still here ~ not yet there
    Posts
    6,490

    Default

    It's interesting that you had a bad experience with your Hafie. A friend of mine had always coveted one and finally met a local breeder. She & I rode together -- her on her "mellow" Hafie and me on my Arab. Her Hafie was WAY more spooky and difficult than my Arab. Another friend got one for his mom and the horse was such a PITA breaking through fences they returned it in a month. And one of my customers has a 25 yr old Hafie which she absolutely ADORES, but who she admits is also hell on fences and bucked her husband off so hard he broke his nose.

    So I guess it really depends on the horse, not the breed.

    I bought 3 Arab mares 2 years ago from a very well-regarded endurance breeding program. Although all three share certain blood lines (mostly CMK), they were very different in terms of temperment and attitude. They range from rather hot and spooky to so deadly quiet to be almost in a coma.

    And I've met afew Arabs like that.

    Honestly, I've been involved with several breeds long enough to say I really know them and I have to say it truly depends on the HORSE, not the breed. I've met SUPER easy-going Arabs and TBs and nasty QH and Paints.

    So my advice is to look at the horse, not the breed.

    Just about any breed can be successful as a trail horse or a "to finish is to win" endurance or LD horse -- it depends on their conformation, HR, training, etc.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov. 1, 2009
    Posts
    552

    Default

    Have you researched the Shagya? As an ex arab person I think you would appreciate them. They have all the good qualities of Arabs, yet have the minds of a really good old fashioned quarter horse. They have personality, looks (although not as refined as an Arab) and make fantastic trail horses.

    Go to ASAV and you can read member stories and find some breeders.

    They are amazing horses. I have 3 from different bloodlines and all of them rode after 30 days of training like they had been ridden for years. I ride alone and none were herd bound on their first ride. They all did and continue to do whatever I ask of them.

    Best of all you get a bit of the that certain something that makes arabs so great, but without the drama.

    I agree that it all depends on the HORSE and not necessarily the breed, as some registries are huge with years of sometimes indiscriminate breeding and have morphed into creating horses within the breed that specialize in a certain event, making it very hard to make blanket statements and to shop for a horse!

    The Shagya breed is very small with careful breeding and based on what I have heard every Shagya owner say, the temperament is consistently solid. At least for now! Big solid feet too! So snap one up before they are ruined.

    They are a little more expensive, but really not bad (and certainly not as expensive as a trip to the emergency room ............



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov. 1, 2009
    Posts
    552

    Default

    This is a request from a friend that will fit in nicely here. I know someone looking for a Saddlebred. Apparently you can find breeders that do not necessarily breed for show, but produce the all around family horse from long ago. I suppose like the foundation quarter horse....

    Can anyone point us in a direction to find any of these breeders?

    We are northerners and all our Saddlebred barns are big time show only...



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Sep. 1, 2008
    Location
    Concord GA
    Posts
    425

    Default

    If you are interested in Paso's go here:
    www.americanpasofinos.com
    nice group of people that can possibly guide you to breeders or other places where you can do test rides (in your area) to see if this is the breed for you

    I have 5, as well as 4 Apps. The Apps are pretty much yard ornaments these days.

    Paso's come in all sizes, my smallest is 13.1 and my largest is a solid 15 hands. I have seen bigger if you are a larger rider, but since you chose a haffie it seems you must be on the smaller size.

    Despite having Paso's I like most of the Missouri Fox Trotters I have met as well as the Rocky Mountains



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Dec. 27, 2006
    Posts
    2,058

    Default

    I have a grade racking horse and a grade walker. My riding buddy has a fox-trotter.

    My trail riding neighbors in OH had racking horses.

    Too small of a sample to be scientific but the gaited breeds all seem to me to have very winning personalities, good work ethic, and a sense of humor.

    The racking horses I've known can be quirky. The more lateral and pacey a gaiting horse is, and the more they are ridden in those gaits, the likelier that they will develop back problems.

    For pure sweetness of dispostion, twhs for me.

    For pretty and gaited, racking horses, and Paso's can be very easy on the eyes. Rocky Mountain horses and other KY gaited breeds, also very pretty nags.

    I'd research Pasos carefully, iirc they are predisposed to some soundness issues, and can be hotter than a lot of the other gaited breeds.

    For sane and sound and personality a fox trotter probably cannot be beat. If I continue to ride past the useful lives of my two (they are middle aged horses, I will be 57 in a few days and suspect I will not be physically able to ride after my late 60s, although I'd like to --they could well be the last horses I own) IF i ever buy another horse I think it will be a fox-trotter.

    Ride a bunch of different gaited critters and see what gaits you like, too. Not everybody loves a running walk, and its way easy to get hooked on a fast racker.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Dec. 27, 2006
    Posts
    2,058

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by howardh View Post
    This is a request from a friend that will fit in nicely here. I know someone looking for a Saddlebred. Apparently you can find breeders that do not necessarily breed for show, but produce the all around family horse from long ago. I suppose like the foundation quarter horse....

    Can anyone point us in a direction to find any of these breeders?

    We are northerners and all our Saddlebred barns are big time show only...
    you might want to think about rescuing a saddlebred. There are a lot of horses from show lines or pulling Amish buggies that would love to be family horses! A lot of ASB' s only act "showy" in the show ring and make excellent all rounders.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Nov. 1, 2009
    Posts
    552

    Default

    I have owned and ridden with all types of gaited horses. I prefer non gaited as I like to trot, but you may want to keep your friends in mind when/if you pick a gaited horse. Some gaited horses will walk with the non gaited, some simply leave them in the dust and if you plan to ride with friends you will find you soon don't have any as they are sick of riding a jigging horse to keep up with you. Fun for you. Not fun for them.

    For some reason all my non gaited breeds have always gotten really fired up riding with Pasos and Peruvians. That piston and paddling seems to get under other horse's skin and cause jigging. I like trotting and going fast and posting all day, but lots of folks don't. Be careful unless all your friends have gaited horses.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jan. 8, 2006
    Location
    B.C. Canada
    Posts
    1,919

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SoCalGal View Post
    Hi there,
    I am new to these forums, although I've read them for awhile. Hi everyone.

    My background with horses is extensive, and diverse. I have ridden hunters and jumpers on and off my whole life, retrained ex-racing TB's, rescued horses, owned & trained Arab show horses, and had several QH. However, last year after a series of HOT blooded Arabs and TB's I realized that I wanted a break from high high energy, hot spooky horses, didn't feel like showing much anymore, and really wanted to enjoy trails, horse camping, etc. I figured I'd try some playdays and some team sorting. In short, I just wanted to have FUN again...no more train train train, show show show. I was burnt out!

    I did some research and decided a Haflinger might be fun, known for their steady dispositions and good hooves, easy keepers, etc. I bought a Haflinger from a big breeder and would you believe...he was the worst horse I've ever owned. Not saying they all are, but he certainly was. In the 8 weeks I owned him he bucked me off, hard, 3 times. In June he broke my hip in 2 places and sent me to the ER. Multiple rods, screws, bolts, and 5 months of healing/rehab later, I am about ready to start riding again. Obviously I shipped him back to the breeder and am NOT interested in another. Imagine, all that after having 2 Arab show horses and 4 ex-racers in the course of a year and a half. Nasty pony!

    My goals remain the same: I want a fun trail horse, one that is comfortable to ride and a nice mover. Sensible, sane, good-legged and with good feet.

    I am a sucker for a pretty horse...the Haflinger wasn't quite my taste to be begin with.

    I figured here in the trails and endurance forums, I could get ideas and info on breeds I have not owned. I've owned most of the common breeds. But I am interested now in some gaited breeds...Peruvian Pasos and Paso Finos among them. After cracking my hip a smooth ride is suddenly more important!

    I would also consider another Arab although not of today's show lines...but I am not familiar with the endurance bloodlines.

    What other smooth, sane, sound and beautiful breeds are people riding on the trails these days? I definitely want an easy going horse, built to last, and fun to be around

    I'd love to hear from everyone! Anyone have Pasos or Paso Finos? I think I've ruled the TWH out...although I know they have lovely temperaments

    Thanks!
    Jenny
    I've met a few hot haffies, so that doesn't surprise me. A friend of mine traded in her hot minded haffie for an icelandic, and hasn't looked back - so that is a fair option if you are looking for a gaited pony sized trail partner.

    If size isn't a matter, another breed you might want to look at is a standardbred - they make extremely nice, sensible minded trail horses, that are perfectly capable all day. Appaloosas (if you want some flash) & QHs are other great options.

    For QHs, I tend to gravitate towards older bloodlines, (think bulldog lines) for steady minded trail work - rather then the halter type lines.

    Paso wise, - I'd take a fino before I'd take a peruvian - but thats just my personal preference - be warned though- pasos can be hot as well, they are considered a hot breed due to the large amount of spanish blood.

    As for Arabians. Endurance lines aren't super well defined, - but in my experience Khemosabi lines oft times tend to be the 'workhorse' line of the bunch , (ime) Padrons can be fairly sensible as well , Bask lines are a bit iffy- I own a wonderful double bred Bask gelding, on the other hand I've met some real doozies from that bloodline so..

    Saddlebreds are another option - also can be hot, or not, depending.

    Any breed you choose of course, comes with the caveat that environment/training and that horses individual personality will most likely play a larger part in your enjoyment level then the bloodline.
    Quote Originally Posted by ExJumper View Post
    Sometimes I'm thrown off, sometimes I'm bucked off, sometimes I simply fall off, and sometimes I go down with the ship. All of these are valid ways to part company with your horse.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Aug. 25, 2007
    Posts
    8,694

    Default

    Mangalarga Marchador.

    See:

    http://usmarchador.com/usmma_news.aspx

    There are over 200 in the U.S. (and 350,000++ in Brazil). Very versitile with multiple, easy ways of going. Inspected prior to registration in Brazil for conformation, temperment, and way of going (many U.S. horses are dual registered). Brazilian inspectors come up every couple of years. Most one generation removed from working animals. They have the size for most American riders. Tend to be easy keepers and very adaptable. I have four that were imported and live outside 24/7 in East TN. Right now it's in the low 20s and none are showing any signs of "cold stress" even though they lived many years in warm Brazil.

    We are a well kept secret, but that's changing.

    G.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Apr. 23, 2009
    Location
    Stanford, CA
    Posts
    203

    Default

    Wow, sounds like a truly bratty haflinger! I have ridden a few and while they were definitely pony-ish in temperament none of them were nearly that bad. My choice for a fun, all around horse is always an arab for working lines. If you get one that isn't the flavor of the month bloodlines and that has been exposed to the wide world they can be quite sane. My mom and I currently have a 4 year old gelding that thinks tarps are the greatest play toy around. He also likes to pick up "scary" things and play with them. Has great fun chasing the other horses around flapping cones and what not. I think he is meant to be a trail horse though, since even though he is still green under saddle he is more solid out on trail than in the arena. Go figure.

    Send me a PM if you want bloodline suggestions or possible contacts, depending on where you are.



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Dec. 6, 2010
    Posts
    145

    Default

    Hi there,

    Thanks for all the info. I LOVE Qh...however, since my upper femur/hip is what I broke it's going to be a long time before the joint comfortably can post or absorb normal impact. This is the first time in my life I've ever considered a non-trotting breed. I rode a Peruvian recently and it was heaven. I rode my friend's Arab, who's a terrific horse, posting was no problem at all and I was amazed at how I've maintained my seat with all this atrophy but then I hurt for 4 days

    It's hard to admit when life events cause some limitations but I'm going to suck it up and just admit it.

    Also last year, I realized that on many horses I've had, trail riding for a few hours causes aches in my knees and ankles. So while QH are one of my favorite breeds I just want a more comfortable horse.

    I am not super tall, 5'5 but have very very long legs so don't look great on super tiny horses unless they have a wider barrel. My legs are really skinny too, think "frog legs" LOL!

    Getting on and off on the trail, especially with my hip surgery plus the abdominal surgery I had recently, stinks on a tall horse which is why I will gravitate towards 14.3-15.1 but with some nice bone/substance. My last TB was 17.3, then I went to the 14.2 Haflinger, imagine what that was like :0

    Since my Haflinger disaster I've done a ton more research and learned that dishonesty and sullen bucking really are not that uncommon. Darn it, wish I'd known that before.

    I agree with everyone who says the individual is more important than the breed. But with that said...having owned multiple individuals of many breeds, I will say that quite often the stereotypes do ring true. Most TB's are hot and a challenge, but I've had a few that were truly truly easy. Most QH are wonderful, some aren't but most are. My Arabs were mostly hot and unpredictable and spooky, but one was not. Interestingly it was my Padron/Khemo gelding that was a rear up and flip over horse, and Padrons are known for that. But some don't

    I haven't heard much negative about Paso Finos yet and am excited to try one out. How about soundness with them? I know Peruvians can be prone to DSLD, etc (sad.)

    Jenny



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jan. 8, 2006
    Location
    B.C. Canada
    Posts
    1,919

    Default

    I've run afoul of a few peruvian pasos who had trouble (metabolically *big muscle mass*) on endurance rides, - but for regular trail riding, I'm sure they'd be lovely. I knew a lady way back who was from the US - she used to come up to our rides and had a cute little fino - she always did very well - I don't recall her fino having much trouble in vetting etc.

    It's rare to hear of a freaky khemo - I guess it depends on which khemo line?
    (to be fair - all my khemos were/are (originally) from the same family and have the same sire - who was a khemo son (Able Khemo) And all of them have been pure workhorse no nonsense types. - which is why I'm partial to them!
    Quote Originally Posted by ExJumper View Post
    Sometimes I'm thrown off, sometimes I'm bucked off, sometimes I simply fall off, and sometimes I go down with the ship. All of these are valid ways to part company with your horse.



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jul. 20, 2007
    Location
    Rising Sun, MD
    Posts
    3,544

    Default

    I'd personally look at a Rocky Mountain Horse, Fox Trotter or TWH. Pasos would not be the way to go if you were looking for not hot- they are known for their get up and go (yes, yes, I know that every horse is an individual yada yada). Look for the pleasure and trail-bred bloodlines in the Walkers and I'm pretty sure you will find exactly what you are looking for. Actually there was a thread in off-course recently about TWH's and they're personalities- you should check it out
    “While the rest of the species is descended from apes, redheads are descended from cats.” Mark Twain



Similar Threads

  1. Ideas on who to breed this Dutch mare to?
    By dressage4ever in forum Sport Horse Breeding
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: May. 2, 2011, 08:38 PM
  2. Need NorCal breed show handler ideas
    By honeylips in forum Sport Horse Breeding
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: Jun. 23, 2010, 07:45 PM
  3. Info about Ocala breed show
    By dressage4ever in forum Sport Horse Breeding
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: Sep. 1, 2009, 10:26 PM
  4. Looking to breed my mare.. stallion ideas?
    By DeucesWild11 in forum Sport Horse Breeding
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: Jun. 20, 2009, 09:53 PM
  5. New Ideas for Breed Shows
    By suregood in forum Sport Horse Breeding
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: Sep. 8, 2008, 12:19 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •