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  1. #1
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    Default Depth Perception not fully developed until horse is 5 or 6...

    That's what a friend of mine was told the other day by an older lady at the barn the other day when my friend made a comment about a "klutzy" yearling. I've never heard such a thing and neither had she, did we learn something new or .....???



  2. #2
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    Really? Not that they are growing fast and getting use to their new and ever increasing size? Just like a fast growing human teenager? Hmmm.

    The only new thing we have learned is that people make up crap without any evidence. Just what makes sense in their tiny minds. Funny how they all of a sudden develop depth perception according to this pundit at the barn when they finally STOP GROWING (at 6). Or the fact that due to the placement of their eyes and the way they see - both monocular and binocular - they have crappy depth perception anyway.



  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Seal Harbor View Post
    Really? Not that they are growing fast and getting use to their new and ever increasing size? Just like a fast growing human teenager? Hmmm.

    The only new thing we have learned is that people make up crap without any evidence. Just what makes sense in their tiny minds. Funny how they all of a sudden develop depth perception according to this pundit at the barn when they finally STOP GROWING (at 6). Or the fact that due to the placement of their eyes and the way they see - both monocular and binocular - they have crappy depth perception anyway.
    LOL Exactly what I thought. My friend even said to her, "Hmmm, I've never heard that one before, are there any studies on the subject?" The woman told her not that she knew of but someone very experienced in competitive trail riding told her so and that it wasn't just an ol' wives tale. (I think she got a tad defensive) I was thinking that some of our very experienced breeders on this forum could say yea or nay...thanks for getting it started!



  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Seal Harbor View Post
    Really? Not that they are growing fast and getting use to their new and ever increasing size? Just like a fast growing human teenager? Hmmm.

    The only new thing we have learned is that people make up crap without any evidence. Just what makes sense in their tiny minds. Funny how they all of a sudden develop depth perception according to this pundit at the barn when they finally STOP GROWING (at 6). Or the fact that due to the placement of their eyes and the way they see - both monocular and binocular - they have crappy depth perception anyway.

    Yes - isn't depth perception affected by location of eyes (either on the side affording vision "behind" or on the front of the face affording binocular vision). Thus, I can't imagine that the degree of depth perception that horses have would be affected by age or growth at all.

    How funny.



  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by risingstarfarm View Post
    Yes - isn't depth perception affected by location of eyes (either on the side affording vision "behind" or on the front of the face affording binocular vision). Thus, I can't imagine that the degree of depth perception that horses have would be affected by age or growth at all.

    How funny.
    Yes, and we couldn't imagine that age would affect it either. From all the studies I've read, horses have rather crappy depth perception across the board...NO mention of age/maturing as a contributing factor. It's amazing they are able to do all that they do for us considering. My friend said she made the comment, "wow, if that's true, it's a wonder they are even able to make it to their 5th or 6th birthday!" Her nice way of saying, "wow, lady, that's a doozy!" Have to admit, I'm suprised there aren't more WTH responses on this thread....maybe it's too stupid to dignify with a response. ?? Thought some might get a kick out of it....



  6. #6
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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by risingstarfarm View Post
    Yes - isn't depth perception affected by location of eyes (either on the side affording vision "behind" or on the front of the face affording binocular vision). Thus, I can't imagine that the degree of depth perception that horses have would be affected by age or growth at all.

    How funny.
    Not to mention that not developing depth perception until a horse was well past maturity might not make him evolutionarily adapted to reproduce since he would likely as not be somebody's meal once his mom (presumably older than 5 or 6) stopped looking out for him.
    Definition of "Horse": a 4 legged mammal looking for an inconvenient place and expensive way to die. Any day they choose not to execute the Master Plan is just more time to perfect it. Be Very Afraid.



  8. #8
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    a stupid question--but if horses have terrible depth perception--how do horse know where and when to take off at a jump?



  9. #9
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    Mine can do a damn impressive sliding stop up to fences. I think he would like to jump them but they are 7ft tall and he chickens out last minute. I have never seen him hit the fence but I bet he is only a couple of inches off. Or if he spooks when standing by me, he never touches me but goes around my body/head. He can also run full tilt through deadfall (trees on the ground) and have never seen him trip, even when he was very little. He is only a yearling.



  10. #10
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    Shame it's not true, it would be a reasonable explanation as to why some are such spooky little ass hats until they are grown!
    "Kindness is free" ~ Eurofoal
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    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances.



  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by omare View Post
    a stupid question--but if horses have terrible depth perception--how do horse know where and when to take off at a jump?
    Horses don't have good depth perception, period! Here is a really good, short article on the subject, how they learn to jump, why they shy, etc.

    http://www.horse-canada.com/articles/HSeyes.htm
    www.DaventryEquestrian.com
    Home of Welsh, ISR/Oldenburg, Westphalian & RPSI approved pony stallions Daventry's Power Play & Goldhills Brandysnap LOM
    Also home to www.EquineAppraisers.com



  12. #12
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    The author brings up some good points and I found the article worth reading.



  13. #13
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    "To focus on distant objects he must raise his head and slightly extend his muzzle."

    This is what you see many top show jumpers doing three strides or so out from a fence --(and it also serves to shift the wait to the hindquarters)......it really points out again why jumping horses in draw reins or over bent frame is most likely not good (I always wondered how overbent horses jumped.)

    I do not know about the rest of the article------that a riider tells the horse to jump by its seat and legs? Really? You mean a horse would fall through it otherwise? At that point it is a little late to be telling a horse to take off-the horse already knows and is preparing to take off several strides back--(can we train blind horses to jump then?) How do horses free jump or do gymnastics on a free rein if horse needs a rider to tell them to "jump" right now? (Isnt Anne Kurinski book all about getting the horse to think for itself in approaching a fence?)

    My totally unscientific not worth 2 cents conclusion is that you can feel when you are riding them that most horses "see" the take off spot at approximately three strides out from a fence. All unscientific of course! (And as my depth perception is about the same I think that is pretty good!)



  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by EqTrainer View Post
    Shame it's not true, it would be a reasonable explanation as to why some are such spooky little ass hats until they are grown!
    Yeah, but then I would have no good explanation for the 10 year old "spookification" that suddenly develops in an older horse. Oh wait, maybe as they get older, they LOSE depth perception! Sort of like I have reading glasses in every room of my house now...
    Definition of "Horse": a 4 legged mammal looking for an inconvenient place and expensive way to die. Any day they choose not to execute the Master Plan is just more time to perfect it. Be Very Afraid.



  15. #15
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    Here is a different viewpoint on horse vison.
    http://www.completerider.com/horsemanfeb2003.html



  16. #16
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    I have two that can see a fly on the gate at A from C. Spooky warmbloods must develop even slower. LOL



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