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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec. 7, 2010
    Posts
    598

    Smile Words of wisdom for a new eventer?

    I am starting with an eventing trainer soon (maybe after Christmas, but I hope not). I have been away from horses for a few years but I used to ride jumpers. I'm sure I am total sack o potatoes at this point but I don't care! I'm gonna work my butt off--I have always wanted to event. And it's a whole new world which is exciting.

    Sooo, wise folks, any advice all new eventers should get?



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr. 23, 2009
    Location
    Stanford, CA
    Posts
    203

    Default

    Always make sure you and your horse are having fun! If you guys aren't, then it isn't worth doing. I am sure other people will chime in with more specific advice, but that is my number one rule. Number two being safety. Good luck with your new addiction.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar. 18, 2005
    Location
    Knoxville, TN
    Posts
    1,089

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    Volunteer at horse trials when you can. It's a great way to enjoy events when you can't or aren't competing, and you'll learn a lot. You'll also meet lots of great fellow eventers that way.....and that segues into my second point of advice: befriend fellow eventers who can share tips, experiences, provide support, and offer lots of friendly camaraderie. I always say, Eventing isn't a sport, it's a family. Get involved and you won't regret it!



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb. 22, 2002
    Location
    Kansas
    Posts
    1,056

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    Join your local USEA Affiliate and your Area's Adult Rider group - you'll find any number of new friends to help you with your new sport.

    If you add your location to your signature, there will be other CoH Forum members who can give you more specifics.
    Brock
    Brock n. (Anglo-Saxon) badger as in Brockenhurst, Brocklebank etc www.area35.us



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan. 2, 2010
    Location
    NY, USA
    Posts
    277

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    Welcome! Besides getting a good trainer (which you already said you have) and volunteering, my advice would be to ask questions. Especially on here. We love to talk and there are a ton of really knowledgeable people on here
    RIP Charlie and Toby

    Adventures



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec. 7, 2010
    Posts
    598

    Default

    Thanks for the advice! Especially about immersing myself in trials even before I start competing. And I'm sure I'll be bothering all of you with questions for a while...



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr. 2, 2009
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    5,335

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    Definitely volunteer -- I love it and have learned SO much from doing it. Join your Area group, they are a phenomenal resource.

    And buy lots of dental floss because you'll be picking bugs out of your giant grin!

    Welcome to the madness! :-D



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar. 26, 2008
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    1,855

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    Not a ton of advice from me, just wanted to say that I switched over to eventing from a background in jumpers last year too! HAVE FUN! Though it'll be hard not to I definitely encourage you to chat with others at events and clinics. This is a great sport to meet people in and I've made some great friends!

    I also made sure to read the rule book very carefully.
    "Last time I picked your feet, you broke my toe!"



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan. 10, 2007
    Location
    too far from the barn
    Posts
    5,647

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    Have fun. Get out xc schooling fairly often to start and ask any of us and anyone at events questions.
    OTTBs rule, but spots are good too!



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec. 2, 2004
    Posts
    3,314

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by wildlifer View Post

    And buy lots of dental floss because you'll be picking bugs out of your giant grin!

    Welcome to the madness! :-D
    Well this one made me log in. Wildlifer you should make this your signature! It would make a great bumper stick "Eventers use dental floss." THAT will leave them guessing.

    Yes do volunteer first, then the rules will make sense to you and you will remember them - not make some foolish mistake that gets the big E someday. Too much time, money and effort invested to not get a score. And you will see a lot of why's and how's for training and preparation to compete. Plus then you will meet the village. Friendships are core to this sport. You will be with like kind.
    Last edited by pony grandma; Dec. 15, 2010 at 11:48 PM.
    About the only time losing is more fun than winning is when you're fighting temptation.
    -- Tom Wilson, actor & comedian



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Dec. 7, 2010
    Posts
    598

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    I can't wait, thanks for the friendly advice.

    To go OT a little (but not much) my mom and I have a tradition of going to big horse shows for my birthday. We moved to Texas recently from California and I've been busy with school and "adult" life (blegh) so we haven't done it in a couple years. Well, this year, since my birthday is April 30, it looks like we might be going to Rolex! Nothing like a road trip and 3 days of some of the best horses around!



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan. 22, 2008
    Posts
    136

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    Welcome to the dark side! When you go to Rolex, do the course walks given by some of the riders and/or Jim Wofford--you'll learn an unbelievable amount from that. And spend some time in the warm-up ring, not just watching the competition itself. Park yourself next to a trainer who knows their stuff (ask someone if you're not sure who those trainers are) and eavesdrop a lot. do this at all events, not just Rolex!
    As other people have said, the friendship and camaraderie in this sport is amazing, so reach out to other people--fellow students, the person stabled next to you--and you'll have more fun than you can imagine!



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Dec. 7, 2010
    Posts
    598

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    Quote Originally Posted by Viva View Post
    Welcome to the dark side! When you go to Rolex, do the course walks given by some of the riders and/or Jim Wofford--you'll learn an unbelievable amount from that. And spend some time in the warm-up ring, not just watching the competition itself. Park yourself next to a trainer who knows their stuff (ask someone if you're not sure who those trainers are) and eavesdrop a lot. do this at all events, not just Rolex!
    As other people have said, the friendship and camaraderie in this sport is amazing, so reach out to other people--fellow students, the person stabled next to you--and you'll have more fun than you can imagine!
    You can join the course walks?! Not sure why, but I figured they would want to keep the general public off the course. Awesome! I'm selling some textbooks tomorrow to start my Rolex fund. I'm sure I'll learn a lot and spend too much money on horsey stuff and have a total blast.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Oct. 14, 2010
    Location
    Horse Heaven
    Posts
    1,899

    Default

    If you like to read blogs, check out Eventing Nation.

    http://www.eventingnation.com/home/



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Dec. 27, 2001
    Location
    Washington, DC
    Posts
    6,626

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    At lower level events, the courses are open pretty much all the time from the afternoon before the event (my husband has been known to jog them with our dog during competition).

    At upper level events or international ones like Rolex, the galloping lane itself is roped off to maintain the footing and the often elaborate decoration/set up, but you can walk outside the ropes along the course, which is what we do when following one of the "official" course walks like Jimmy Wofford's.

    You are pretty darn close, and then on cross country day, after the last horse is through, you can go out and stand right next to/in front of, or inside of the fences.
    The big man -- no longer an only child

    His new little brother



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Dec. 7, 2010
    Posts
    598

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    Quote Originally Posted by asterix View Post
    At lower level events, the courses are open pretty much all the time from the afternoon before the event (my husband has been known to jog them with our dog during competition).

    At upper level events or international ones like Rolex, the galloping lane itself is roped off to maintain the footing and the often elaborate decoration/set up, but you can walk outside the ropes along the course, which is what we do when following one of the "official" course walks like Jimmy Wofford's.

    You are pretty darn close, and then on cross country day, after the last horse is through, you can go out and stand right next to/in front of, or inside of the fences.
    Then I'll have to get lots of pictures of me making an idiot of myself all over the fences. Man, I feel like a giggling little girl. (I guess it's the girl from years past. My favorite VHS when I was little was footage from Burghley.)



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Feb. 16, 2010
    Posts
    445

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    Quote Originally Posted by alg0181 View Post
    You can join the course walks?! Not sure why, but I figured they would want to keep the general public off the course. Awesome! I'm selling some textbooks tomorrow to start my Rolex fund. I'm sure I'll learn a lot and spend too much money on horsey stuff and have a total blast.

    Hope you do better than I did... I sold my books this semester for a grand total $10. YAY! (One of the Joys of being an English major Is the pathetic return on books :/)



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Dec. 7, 2010
    Posts
    598

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    Quote Originally Posted by sarah88 View Post
    Hope you do better than I did... I sold my books this semester for a grand total $10. YAY! (One of the Joys of being an English major Is the pathetic return on books :/)
    I actually graduate on the 18th, so I have several semesters of leftover books to sell. I got a quote for $140. Still way less than I paid, but better than $10!



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jul. 16, 2003
    Location
    Guthrie, OK
    Posts
    1,602

    Default

    Read the rules!! I have been absolutely amazed at the number of people that are "new" to eventing (read done a few Novices and now moved up to training) that still don't rules regarding bits, run outs/refusals, what optimal time vs speed faults mean, etc.
    Volunteering and/or "grooming" for someone will also introduce you to the little things that aren't really rules but make you life easier. Like when you can enter the dressage arena, what a packet is/where to find it/what is in it, where you can graze or hack and where you can't, etc.

    Good luck and have fun! THAT is the most important thing. Oh, and KICK ON!



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Apr. 11, 2006
    Location
    Lodi Ohio
    Posts
    1,427

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    Find a mentor. Someone you can go to events with (maybe groom) and learn from. Maybe your trainer, or somebody from COTH. I have helped a few folks along and enjoy doing it. Just buddy up if you're volunteering. It's a great sport with great people in it.

    Enjoy and welcome.

    Nancy



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