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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb. 6, 2003
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    1,377

    Default Do children and viewing or presenting sales horses mix?

    Curious what others will say.

    Buyers: If you were going to travel a distance to see a horse for sale, would you bring your kid under the age of 7?

    Sellers: Do you feel you could calmly stay focused showing your sales horse with cackling and kid sounds distracting your horse? Or, would it not matter?

    Farm Owners: What is your thought on this?


    (Sometimes I just want to smack myself, and should of had a V8! Doh! No brainer, one would think. )



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr. 14, 2006
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    Saco, Maine
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    Under 7? Leave it at home!
    *Unless* it is a horse crazy AND educated kid who will watch listen and learn from the experience.

    Leave the dog at home too. With the husband
    Proud and achy member of the Eventing Grannies clique.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar. 12, 2006
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    4,343

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    If the horse is for the child, it makes sense for the buyer to bring the child. Or possibly for the seller to have a child on hand to ride.

    I mean, yeah if your kid is an obnoxious brat, they should not be there unless you the buyer want to make sure the horse could care less about child behavior. And I would not think a seller would want a bratty child about giving people a reason to be annoyed or displeased.

    But there certainly are good young kids who are quiet and unobtrusive who could hang out. Sadly, almost all parents with obnoxious brats think their child falls into this category while parents of quiet unobtrusive children do things like leave them at home.

    I do think that for a family horse, it makes sense to make sure the horse will ignore child like behavior...



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr. 29, 2006
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    Evansville, Wisconsin
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    Default

    Unless the horse/pony for sale is meant to be a short stirrup packer, or something similiar, then no, I don't believe it's in anyone's best interest to have children present for horse shopping.

    Depends on the child, obviously, but as a general rule, I'd say no. Too distracting, too dangerous.
    "In order to really enjoy a dog, one doesn’t merely train him to be semi-human. The point of it is to open oneself to the possibility of becoming part dog."
    -Edward Hoagland



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar. 12, 2006
    Location
    Western South Dakota
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    We have had people show up to try horses and bring their children. It has not been a problem for us. But sometimes, Mom is too worried that the kids will cause a problem, making it hard for her.

    We have also had many people make horse shopping into a family vacation as we are located in a great tourist area. That has worked out very well too.



  6. #6
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    Feb. 20, 2010
    Location
    All 'round Canadia
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    I think most kids under 7 should be left at home.
    But there are exceptions. We recently treated a young child. Treatments last 2.5 hours, and often the 6 year old sibling of the child we were treating would accompany mom or dad, and wait with them until the treatment was over.

    That kid was never any trouble. Sat quietly, colored or listened to something on headphones. There was no area to run or play, not even comfortable chairs, and if I didn't see him I wouldn't have known he was even there.

    If it's a kid like that, no worries



  7. #7
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    Jan. 23, 2005
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    591

    Default

    It doesn't matter to me one way or the other. If the horse can't keep it together at home with children doing what children do how the heck can you expect it to be at a show? I can multi task. I have no problem tuning out any outside distractions. I expect my horses to do the same.
    M



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct. 2, 2007
    Location
    Mirabel, QC
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    As long as there is someone along to watch the kid, or that arrangements have been made with the seller about it, not a problem with me at all.
    www.EquusMagnificus.ca
    Breeding & Sales - Currently: Eventing & Derby prospects
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  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar. 23, 2005
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
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    If the child is well-behaved, I wouldn't be bothered. Also if the horse will potentially be ridden by the child (either it is for the child or is to be a family horse) then bringing the child makes sense. Even without that, the fact that buyer has a child means the horse may well be expected to at least tolerate the presence of children, so it's probably wise for buyer to find out how horse handles that before purchasing.
    Proud member of the EDRF



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan. 8, 2006
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    B.C. Canada
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    9 times out of 10 my kids have been along on horse purchasing trips - mostly because they are my kids and it's not like I can lock them in a bus locker just to make some random stranger 'comfortable' showing their sales horse.

    Far as I'm concerned, it's a good litmus test, my kids handle all our horses, I'm certainly not going to purchase one that isn't sane around a kid. I do remember a far while back when I was looking for a new stallion prospect- breeder absolutely freaked when she opened the gate, and my 13 yr old went in to handle it, not me. For me that was a red flag.
    Quote Originally Posted by ExJumper View Post
    Sometimes I'm thrown off, sometimes I'm bucked off, sometimes I simply fall off, and sometimes I go down with the ship. All of these are valid ways to part company with your horse.



  11. #11
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    Sep. 20, 2005
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    Quote Originally Posted by rainechyldes View Post
    9 times out of 10 my kids have been along on horse purchasing trips - mostly because they are my kids and it's not like I can lock them in a bus locker just to make some random stranger 'comfortable' showing their sales horse.

    Far as I'm concerned, it's a good litmus test, my kids handle all our horses, I'm certainly not going to purchase one that isn't sane around a kid. I do remember a far while back when I was looking for a new stallion prospect- breeder absolutely freaked when she opened the gate, and my 13 yr old went in to handle it, not me. For me that was a red flag.


    Uh, it's called a liability issue and I would have freaked too. What are you thinking letting your kid go handle a horse that belongs to someone else without clearing it with them first? What if the horse hadn't been kid safe?

    IMO, no, kids don't belong on buying trips unless the horse/pony is for a kid. It has nothing to do with the kid being annoying and everything to do with it being a liability issue.



  12. #12
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    Jan. 8, 2006
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    B.C. Canada
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    Quote Originally Posted by SaturdayNightLive View Post


    Uh, it's called a liability issue and I would have freaked too. What are you thinking letting your kid go handle a horse that belongs to someone else without clearing it with them first? What if the horse hadn't been kid safe?

    IMO, no, kids don't belong on buying trips unless the horse/pony is for a kid. It has nothing to do with the kid being annoying and everything to do with it being a liability issue.
    so the liability would go away if I handled it instead?
    I never said I didn't clear it first, - I'm pretty to the point on the phone before I arrive about what I require -ie my kids ALL handle our horses - the red flag was she freaked after she's been so casual about it on the phone. RED FLAG!? hello. I don't blind side people when I'm horse shopping - not my style.

    And I do seriously believe my kids who are very competent horseman in their own rights have every right to be on a purchasing trip considering they are involved in day to day operations of our breeding farm as well as competitive barn horses.

    but then I maybe have children who are a bit more skilled? mine all drive tractors, handle stallions (when I have one) help with breeding, toss tonnes of hay around. bring horses in and out, ride 100 mile endurance rides, as well as show- know how to pull shoes, including my 11 year old who help pull shoes off this fall.
    Quote Originally Posted by ExJumper View Post
    Sometimes I'm thrown off, sometimes I'm bucked off, sometimes I simply fall off, and sometimes I go down with the ship. All of these are valid ways to part company with your horse.



  13. #13
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    Apr. 28, 2004
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    Saratoga Springs, NY
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    Quote Originally Posted by CHS View Post
    It doesn't matter to me one way or the other. If the horse can't keep it together at home with children doing what children do how the heck can you expect it to be at a show? I can multi task. I have no problem tuning out any outside distractions. I expect my horses to do the same.
    this.



  14. #14
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    Jan. 1, 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fantastic View Post
    Buyers: If you were going to travel a distance to see a horse for sale, would you bring your kid under the age of 7?
    Perhaps they have to bring the kid if they are "traveling a distance." No way to know what their child care situation is...perhaps they have to stay overnight to see your horse? I don't suppose they can kennel a kid for the weekend...probably laws about that.

    I'm not a parent, so I don't know. Sometimes the weekend is the only quality time a working parent has with their offspring.

    If I were in this situation, I would probably try to make sure there was someone with me to watch the kid while I tried the horse.



  15. #15
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    Feb. 6, 2003
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    As long as the child is of an age where they stay put when told and can remain calm enough that they don't resemble feeding time at the spider-monkey cage.
    They shouldn't have to stand still and never make a peep, but basic manners necessary. And closer to 7 this should be viable.

    As a seller I'd be a wreck if there was a small child wandering off...if they got into a stall or paddock with a horse and got stepped on, knocked around or kicked I could be in deep manure.

    And I would find it a waste of time if the child was hollering out, "mom, look! Mom? Mom! Hey Mom, lookit this!" If Mom can't pay any attention to the horse, most likely it's a waste of time for seller and buyer.
    You jump in the saddle,
    Hold onto the bridle!
    Jump in the line!
    ...Belefonte



  16. #16
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    Aug. 17, 2004
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    Rixeyville, VA
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    I've had prospective buyers bring children. It's not a big deal. They tend to be well behaved children and I always have IF Jr. available to supervise if need be.
    Where Norwegian Fjords Rule
    http://www.ironwood-farm.com



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Aug. 11, 2003
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    Want me to bring along a kid and buy your horse, or want me to stay home and not buy your horse?

    Whether or not you take along your kid depends on child care arrangements. Not all of us have a babysitter, or a family member living nearby.



  18. #18
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    Jun. 10, 2001
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    Rising Sun, Maryland, USA
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    Quote Originally Posted by RiverBendPol View Post
    Under 7? Leave it at home!
    *Unless* it is a horse crazy AND educated kid who will watch listen and learn from the experience.

    Leave the dog at home too. With the husband
    Yeah... works great if you have a husband. My husband's dead... people sometimes seem to forget that not everybody has that perfect family with two parents. I don't have support. I have to do what I have to do. I swear if I could buy groceries online I wouldn't ever go in a store again. Oh... and let me tell you, bra shopping is such a hoot, too. Yeah... just got back from the store where he threw a temper tantrum... got milk and orange juice and called it quits.

    I'm not in the market for a horse. If I was, I would probably ask the seller if it was okay to bring my child. If they said children were not allowed, honestly, I probably wouldn't go look at the horse. I also would bring another adult and he would be watched. My trainer loves my son and we'd probably take turns between kiddo duty and looking at the horse. Perhaps, I would see if I could find a sitter, but pretty much where I go, he goes. I don't have the extra money to be paying a sitter in order for me to have recreation. That being said, my little guy is very well behaved around the horses... knows what to do if I say "BACK UP!" or "go stand over by the ____" while I move a horse. He knows you don't touch the electric fence. He loves the horses, too.

    In addition, there are a lot of people who consider the horse to be part of the family (I know mine are) and are looking for a family horse. I wouldn't go shopping for a family dog and leave the kid at home.

    I keep my horses at home and anything on this property has to be well behaved towards my child... bottom line. So, that would be one of my purchasing criteria.

    If I had a horse for sale, I wouldn't have a problem with a young child coming, but I would expect that the child would have adult supervision.

    As for the dogs... I think people should ask prior to bringing dogs. My vet brings her dog... lets him loose... he chases the cats (who aren't really used to dogs) and my horses used to not be used to dogs either... it was just a mess.
    http://www.leakycreek.com/
    http://leakycreek.wordpress.com/ Rainbows & Mourning Doves Blog
    John P. Smith II 1973-2009 Love Always
    Father, Husband, Friend, Firefighter- Cancer Sucks- Cure Melanoma



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Sep. 8, 2007
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    Well, that may be the only way they can come and see the horse. Not everyone has a babysitter on call. Of course the parents are expected to keep the child out of harms way and sensible behavior. But if the horse is distracted by the sounds children make, then not the horse for that family IMO. My horses put up with all kinds of sounds from my five year old, LOL!

    And MK Smith, I do know how you feel. My husband is with me thank God, but he is military and has spent years overseas throughout our marriage. People do forget that there are single moms and dads out there, and I don't just trust anyone to watch my child. So if my daughter could not come with me to look at a horse, I would pass that horse up.



  20. #20
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    Jul. 17, 2008
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    PA
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    Have I accidently fallen into an alternate universe? Is this thread actually leaning pro-child? Where's the Twilight Zone music?
    "Your best can be worn at any length"- Jason Mraz



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