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View Poll Results: Fence it or not?

Voters
56. You may not vote on this poll
  • Fencing around it

    36 64.29%
  • Leave it open (ie low chain with letters)

    20 35.71%
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Results 1 to 20 of 34
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar. 16, 2003
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    Wet and Windy Washington
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    3,811

    Default Dressage arena- fence it or not?

    So I'm putting in an outdoor dressage arena and am debating whether to fence it in (4 ft fencing) or leave it open.

    As I plan on boarding horses I thought I see what the majority of you thought.

    There are pro's and con's to each.
    I have horse to sell to you. Horse good for riding. Can pull cart. Horse good size. Eats carrots and apples. Likes attention. Move head to music. No like opera! You like you buy.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan. 12, 2000
    Location
    Proud owner of one Lunar acre! (Campanus Crater, The Moon)
    Posts
    14,184

    Default

    I wouldn't even bother with the chain. Just the letters. If you want a straight rail and corners, then use the chain.
    "Relinquish your whip!!"



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun. 1, 2002
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    11,729

    Default

    Fence it in. I think there are more benefits to having a secure place to work a horse then an open place.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun. 7, 2006
    Posts
    9,397

    Default

    Leave it open.

    Some landscaping around the edges/corners (sans fence) adds a really nice touch IMO.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb. 28, 2008
    Posts
    4,078

    Default

    Leave it open. I much prefer an unfenced dressage arena, BUT that is provided I have a fenced area to ride too if needed.
    Worry is the biggest enemy of the present... it’s like using your imagination to create things you don’t want.
    An adorable photography book, makes a perfect gift.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun. 20, 2009
    Location
    Northeast Ohio, where mud rules your world...
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    1,366

    Default

    Depends. will this double as a turnout spot, place for free lunging, get much traffic from green riders or horses? Then fence would make it more useful

    Have you spent gobs of money on footing? Then leave it unfenced because all the other options will reek havoc on your footing and you will not want to tempt boarders to let Fluffy take a tear around your dressage arena "just so he can blow off some steam".
    ...don't sh** where you eat...



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep. 16, 2010
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    636

    Default

    I can see pros and cons to each. There is an unfenced dressage arena at the farm where I trailer in for lessons, and we use it a lot during the summer. I do like it because then my horse and i are used to unfenced areas when it's time to show. It's no big deal. On the other hand, I completely trust this mare. Riding my younger horse out there would be less fun because he is not 100% solid yet and might just decide to do something silly and take off. But I suppose he will have to learn someday so there is no time like the present. But if you will see much green horse traffic I would recommend having some other fenced area (small arena or very large roundpen) for those horses to gain confidence in.

    There is a fence along one side which is useful for practicing certain things--sidepass, turn on forehand, et cetera. these are not necessary dressage-y things but still useful for a horse to know so I like that the rail is there.

    Would you mind PMing me the cost (or ballpark cost) of putting in your arena? I hope (wish) to do a proper dressage arena on my property but I am scared to even call the excavators.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan. 5, 2009
    Location
    Central, FL
    Posts
    1,001

    Default

    Fence it, as an owner of a green horse I appreciate a more secure boundary.
    --Luck is what happens when preparedness meets opportunity--



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug. 8, 2007
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    1,235

    Default

    If you plan on boarding, I would fence it in because most people feel safer in a fully fenced arena.

    I used to board at a place that had a large oval ring, and then had the 60x40 arena set up inside of it. They measured it out and put up block letters. It was nice because you had the safety of the fence, and the accuracy of the dressage arena with a low/no fence.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr. 28, 2009
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    Alberta's bread basket
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    1,678

    Default

    We have ours fenced but beyond the perimeter of the dressage ring. There is the interior dressage arena marked with the little dressage rails and letters, measured out at 20x60m. About 15 m beyond the perimeter of the dressage arena, we fenced in with solid post and rail. This way, when someone gets tossed, the horse is enclosed (it's not a matter of IF, but WHEN a rider gets tossed). The whole area is footed with the same footing materials. Thinking ahead, this gives you enough room for a judge booth during a schooling show and still plenty of room for the horse to warmup on the perimeter.
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  11. #11
    Join Date
    Apr. 29, 2008
    Location
    Houston, TX
    Posts
    1,601

    Default

    I would fence it (with fencing that will definitely keep a horse in). Like rodawn, I also like rings that are fenced wider than the regulation size of a dressage arena - it makes it more useful. If you already have other rings that fit this purpose, then you might not need it and an open ring can be a nice training tool.

    I like the functionality of a fenced ring, but as others have mentioned, it may require additional rules to keep people from using it as a turnout and you may get more wear and tear from those wanting to ride only on the rail.

    If you opt not to fence it, I wouldn't bother with chains or other decorative fencing unless you decide to have a show at some point.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jul. 15, 2003
    Posts
    883

    Default

    Owner of a local barn (boarding and lessons) had an unfenced dressage arena fairly close to a busy road. There was an "incident" and the insurance company told her to fence it. Which she did. It was larger than 20x40m, and the dressage fence was inside it.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jun. 23, 2010
    Location
    south
    Posts
    627

    Default

    Leave it open just like at the shows. If you're learning dressage, you should be able to keep your horse within the ring.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jul. 16, 2003
    Location
    Guthrie, OK
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    1,601

    Default

    Fence it. Yes, you "should" be able to keep your horse within the ring. But SHOULD and always do are 2 very different things.

    Don't put the fence ON the arena edge though. Leave enough room around the arena to allow you to ride around it and to make a circle at one or both ends. JUST LIKE AT SHOWS!!! Good practice.

    And if for some reason your horse becomes a free soul, with or without you on its back, it can't go anywhere. Provided you have closed the gate that is.

    Mine is not fenced and I wish it was. While I don't hit the dirt often, I would really like to be able to free jump my horses. And have a "wall" to teach WHOA to the ones that don't quite have that concept yet.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Apr. 28, 2009
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    Alberta's bread basket
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by princessfluffybritches View Post
    Leave it open just like at the shows. If you're learning dressage, you should be able to keep your horse within the ring.
    Yes, and even top riders have spills - - Guenter Seidel is recovering from such a one that nearly could have ended his riding career, as did Eric Lamaze who rode all summer with a broken foot, and who can forget some of the major head injuries of this past year, not the least of which was sustained by Courtney King-Dye?

    Showing is one thing. Schooling is meant to have safety precautions adhered to.

    If you're riding a horse, it is not a matter of if you will have a spill, but a matter of WHEN you will, and you all will sooner or later, and not all of you will be able to land neatly on your feet whilst holding the reins in your hands. Most falls will be a heavy splat on the ground and maybe you can look up whilst spitting dirt out of your teeth just quick enough to see your horse's tail whizzing over to yonder field. And amateurs can come off a horse even easier than the pros do.

    If you're having a boarding facility, you should fence it. As a stable owner, you are responsible for horse injuries, rider injuries, and especially for keeping your horses contained in their designated spaces.
    https://www.facebook.com/MariposaSportHorses

    Practice! Patience! Persistence!



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Mar. 16, 2003
    Location
    Wet and Windy Washington
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    Default

    Thanks all! Looks like I'll fence it (or at least look into it thoroughly!)

    Not sure I can make it bigger then the area like rodawn said but I certainly like that idea!
    I have horse to sell to you. Horse good for riding. Can pull cart. Horse good size. Eats carrots and apples. Likes attention. Move head to music. No like opera! You like you buy.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Mar. 3, 2010
    Location
    Georgia
    Posts
    1,523

    Default

    Mine is in a fenced pasture, and I had not planned to fence it for the reasons stated above. I have since decided to put fence around it a good way from the arena's edge. It turns out the geriatric herd of three inhabiting the pasture have aspirations of Grand Prix pooping-- right down the centerline!
    "Rock n' roll's not through, yeah, I'm sewing wings on this thing." --Destroyer
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  18. #18
    Join Date
    Jun. 23, 2010
    Location
    south
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    627

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by rodawn View Post
    Yes, and even top riders have spills - - Guenter Seidel is recovering from such a one that nearly could have ended his riding career, as did Eric Lamaze who rode all summer with a broken foot, and who can forget some of the major head injuries of this past year, not the least of which was sustained by Courtney King-Dye?

    Showing is one thing. Schooling is meant to have safety precautions adhered to.

    If you're riding a horse, it is not a matter of if you will have a spill, but a matter of WHEN you will, and you all will sooner or later, and not all of you will be able to land neatly on your feet whilst holding the reins in your hands. Most falls will be a heavy splat on the ground and maybe you can look up whilst spitting dirt out of your teeth just quick enough to see your horse's tail whizzing over to yonder field. And amateurs can come off a horse even easier than the pros do.

    If you're having a boarding facility, you should fence it. As a stable owner, you are responsible for horse injuries, rider injuries, and especially for keeping your horses contained in their designated spaces.

    I don't think a fence is going to do much except give a person a false sense ofsecurity.
    How many serious injuries have happened in dressage inside a fenced in area? How many have been serious because of not wearing a helmet?



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jun. 23, 2010
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    south
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    627

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by kinnip View Post
    Mine is in a fenced pasture, and I had not planned to fence it for the reasons stated above. I have since decided to put fence around it a good way from the arena's edge. It turns out the geriatric herd of three inhabiting the pasture have aspirations of Grand Prix pooping-- right down the centerline!
    Nothing like pooping down the centerline



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Feb. 21, 2009
    Location
    Rootown!
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    2,108

    Default

    I would fence it. Where I board now, they don't have a fenced outdoor and while I don't mind, a lot of people won't ride out there. I did get nervous once when I fell of jumping and my horse took off towards the road but thankfully he stopped after he realized there was grass! If I had a green horse or I was at all uncomfortable I would not ride out there. The road we are on is very busy and arena is fairly close to it.
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