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  1. #1
    Lilinana Guest

    Default What would you do?

    My horse has just been brought back into work after a number of years off (due to me having a baby). He was in work for 1 week when he went lame on his offside fore. The vet was called and using nerveblocks we discovered that the pian was in his fetlock region. He had x-rays yesterday and we discovered that he has some artheritic (sp?) changes in his fetlock joint. Not huge changes but obviously enough to make him sore. He is only lame when he has to put pressure on the affected leg eg on a circle in trot.

    My question really is should I try injecting the joint to see if this can make him sound again? My number 1 priority is to get him comfy and then IF he can cope with light work then great. If not he will be retired and live out the rest of his life in luxury.

    WWYD?



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug. 5, 2006
    Posts
    5,045

    Default

    A....inject

    B. make sure he is balanced in his trimming/shoeing.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep. 13, 2002
    Location
    Azle, Teh-has
    Posts
    7,725

    Default

    If he were mine...

    hmmm.

    I would inject the joint.
    Give him a boost of legend.
    and put him on MSM and yucca.

    throw him out and start again in 2-3 weeks.
    http://kaboomeventing.com/
    http://kaboomeventing.blogspot.com/
    Horses are amazing athletes and make no mistake -- they are the stars of the show!



  4. #4
    Lilinana Guest

    Default

    What do you make of the thought that if I have to inject him in the joint to make him rideable it is cruel and I shouldn't be riding him at all (nor my view btw)?

    I think I would like to try the injections, with my eyes completely open to the fact that it's not a once off treatment and it might not work.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan. 21, 2010
    Posts
    2,170

    Default

    IMO, if it's regular IA injections (e.g monthly, or even every 3 months IMO), then that's my limit of "too cruel" and I consider "unmanageable".

    But if yearly IA injections and a supplement (IM adequan, for example) take care of it, with occasional bute after really hard rides, then I think that falls under "manageable".

    But, if it were my horse, I'd try everything before IA injections. Try IM adequan or IV legend. Also, regular work may make things better. The poor kid was yanked out of a pasture, ridden, and came up lame after a week. Hell, *I* would come up lame after years off of work! I didn't ride for two weeks, took an hour trail ride on Sunday, and I'm lame at the walk today!!



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb. 1, 2008
    Location
    Nowhere, Maryland
    Posts
    3,133

    Default

    I would probably go ahead and do the injection, and then if he comes sound, do a joint supplement or Adequan and light work and see how it goes. Six months is the minimum amount of time between injections I would want to see in a riding horse--a year would definitely be better.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar. 5, 2009
    Location
    In a barn
    Posts
    967

    Default

    I would look at the feet FIRST to make sure he's balanced, not run down in the heels, too long toes, etc. And if he needs it, put lift pads on to get his angles back where they need to be.

    I just recently experienced the same senario with one of my horses - a thoroughbred with hooves that don't grow much and with very thin soles and walls. He had been in shoes on his fronts, but came up lame this fall. He too has arthritis in his fetlocks. Vet recommended lift pads and shoes that were set back a tad to help support his heels, bute for a few days, then a feed through joint supplement with HA. He was almost immediately traveling sound, and much more comfortable. I just have to really watch his hoof angles now, and put him on a 5 week farrier schedule.

    I am a little adverse to injections as the first line of defense....and besides, if you don't fix the balance the injections won't help.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun. 23, 2010
    Location
    south
    Posts
    627

    Default

    Did he get shoes and get a "close nail"? Arthritic changes-is that sidebone?
    Sole abcess?

    I , too, would call the farrier out and start from the very bottom of the horse. That's where most of the problems are. (hooves)



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep. 7, 2009
    Location
    Lexington, KY
    Posts
    17,486

    Default

    How much work was he in? Riding at a walk for increasing amounts of time for at least 2 weeks before adding a trot would have been my recommendation. Perhaps you did too much too soon.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    May. 17, 2003
    Posts
    5,591

    Default

    She's x-rayed. He's got arthritic changes in the fetlock.

    I'd (with vet's blessing) inject the joint, then take a very careful look at his feet/trim/shoing, then bring him very carefully back to work over the course of a couple of months--like I would an injury rehab.. I'd probably put him on Adequan, too.

    Heck, I'd inject the joint even if I was going to retire him back out to pasture.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan. 21, 2010
    Posts
    2,170

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by atr View Post
    She's x-rayed. He's got arthritic changes in the fetlock.
    Just because there are joint changes doesn't mean that's the cause of the lameness. My 24 year old's hocks are a complete mess by radiograph standards and he's perfectly sound.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    May. 17, 2003
    Posts
    5,591

    Default

    Nerve blocks isolating the source of the lameness plus x-rays showing arthritic issues in that source offer a reasonable basis for diagnosis, especially by a vet on the scene, I would have thought.

    If treating the obvious doesn't work, then moving on to looking for the more esoteric makes sense.



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