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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan. 28, 2003
    Location
    Hollywood, but not the one where they have the Oscars!
    Posts
    7,773

    Default Sheep

    Has anyone ever worked with them? I may take a job that requires me to take care of 30 sheep, 5 mini goats, 3 cows and 5 horses...
    "You can't really debate with someone who has a prescient invisible friend"
    carolprudm



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec. 17, 2007
    Location
    Meadowview VA
    Posts
    2,250

    Default

    There is a new vet in our area who works with all animals-pet and barnyard, including horses, but he won't work with sheep. He said if they get sick, they either die or get better.
    We have a ram who adopted us. (Baaarack). He is very docile for a ram, perhaps because he thinks he's a horse.
    Will you be assisting with lambing? Baaarack's former herd is moved to the pasture next to us in Dec./Jan. for lambing.
    I know copper is poisonous to sheep.
    Hope this dribble of information helps some.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct. 3, 2004
    Location
    East Berlin, PA
    Posts
    229

    Default

    They can be very very flighty, be careful not to get caught in their path if they panic. I don't know anything else but my neighbor has about 200 I get the impression they are "a few french fries short of a happy meal", they don't appear very bright
    "Sport N Curls"
    Sport Horse type Curlies and Sport Ponies with the mind, looks and athletic ability to compete in a variety of disciplines.
    www.seldomcreek.com



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar. 28, 2006
    Location
    Oregon
    Posts
    3,373

    Default

    Sheep are trying to die from the very moment they are born. They are frequently successful!

    The saying "When we get sheep" is the equivalent of "When Hell freezes over" at our house.
    Family Partners Welsh Ponies - Home of Section B Welsh stallion *Wedderlie Mardi Gras LOM/AOE http://www.welshponies.com
    Click here to buy: A Guide To In Hand Showing of Your Welsh Pony



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug. 19, 2007
    Posts
    822

    Default

    Baaaarack. My in-laws have sheep. They are not very bright, much less so than goats. That's about the sum total of my knowledge on sheep, sorry, and good luck.
    Please don't sabotash my conchess.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov. 6, 2008
    Posts
    1,373

    Default

    We bought one a few years ago at the 4H Livestock Auction...with the intention to send her right to the butcher...but then couldn't stand the thought of the little fair princess (who raised her) watching as her "baby" was loaded up for slaughter...so we took her home.
    They are so cute and funny when they are young. It's like you can look into their faces and see someone in there. She and our lab would play tag, and she had free run of the place. Then one day, it's like a shutter comes down, so that when you look in their faces, there really isn't anyone home anymore...just the answering machine. She would come barreling around the corner of the barn and slam into my knees so hard that I was afraid she was going to break my legs.
    So we had a friend take her to the butcher, and stay right with her to make certainl she was quickly and humanely slaughtered.
    She was goooood



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb. 27, 2004
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    1,155

    Default

    Sheep actually are pretty smart. I think they can recognize over 120 different faces (people). They are pretty tough too and not as easy to kill as some might think.

    I have a dozen or so that I use training my dogs. At this point I can do most things with them without a dog, they learn really fast esp if food or a bucket is involved. You have to know that to move them you get behind their eye and to stop them get in front.

    Yes, they can be deadly, I call them bowling balls with wool. They can take you out at the knees if your not pay attention.

    Most of the time they are pretty easy keepers. Predators are a problem and you have to fence them in accordingly and maybe have a livestock guardian dog.

    Mine aren't really petable but they are gentle and use to people and handling. I wouldn't really be to worried about them unless they ask you to shear them. LOL (NOT FUN)



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan. 28, 2003
    Location
    Hollywood, but not the one where they have the Oscars!
    Posts
    7,773

    Default

    I was warned that keeping their feet up was difficult..???
    "You can't really debate with someone who has a prescient invisible friend"
    carolprudm



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar. 23, 2004
    Location
    Versailles,Ky
    Posts
    699

    Default Find the Border Collie people

    Best way to learn about sheep is to go to your local dog vet office and get the name of a local border collie group who have sheep herding trials. Many of them will have their own flock and be happy to teach you about the sheep. I just went to a trial last weekend. You may really get into it! Here are some pics.
    http://smilebox.com/playBlog/4d6a413...&blogview=true
    Touchstone Farm. Visit us at the slideshow of our Dutch mares and foals below! 30 mnutes of photos.
    http://www.smilebox.com/playBlog/4d6...304f513d3d0d0a



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan. 28, 2003
    Location
    Hollywood, but not the one where they have the Oscars!
    Posts
    7,773

    Default

    well, my JRT *thinks* he is an aussie/border collie...maybe he will be able to help...lol
    "You can't really debate with someone who has a prescient invisible friend"
    carolprudm



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Sep. 16, 2005
    Location
    ON, Canada
    Posts
    405

    Default

    I have Shetlands. They are hardy, easy lambers, great mothers and very tasty! They are also very clever, mischievious little houdinis.

    They are highly addictive. I started with 3 and now have 15!



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jul. 6, 2005
    Location
    Aiken, SC
    Posts
    1,541

    Default

    I have four Gulf Coast Native sheep, and I LOVE them! They are SO easy compared to horses. I got mine in pairs, and each time I brought a pair home, I kept them in a stall and hand fed them alfalfa pellets for a couple of days. Also, when they got the inclination to head butt me (I think it's something most of them will try when they're figuring out the flock's pecking order), I caught them by the horns and held them still until they submitted. It only takes a couple of times for them to learn that head butting a human is a really bad idea. Now I have a sweet little flock of well behaved sheep. They come running when they see me but are very respectful when they get close.

    Do you know what breed the sheep you'll be caring for are? Some have more trouble with parasites and/or foot rot. Gulf Coast Natives are very resistant to both. Mine get their feet trimmed once a year, at the same time that they get sheared. No problems. Shetlands, I think, are also easy. But some other breeds are more high maintenance.



  13. #13
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    Feb. 27, 2004
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    1,155

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Touchstone Farm,Ky View Post
    Best way to learn about sheep is to go to your local dog vet office and get the name of a local border collie group who have sheep herding trials. Many of them will have their own flock and be happy to teach you about the sheep. I just went to a trial last weekend. You may really get into it! Here are some pics.
    http://smilebox.com/playBlog/4d6a413...&blogview=true
    Nice Photos. Someday I'll get enough confidence as a handler to trial.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Nov. 6, 2008
    Posts
    1,373

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Touchstone Farm,Ky View Post
    Best way to learn about sheep is to go to your local dog vet office and get the name of a local border collie group who have sheep herding trials. Many of them will have their own flock and be happy to teach you about the sheep. I just went to a trial last weekend. You may really get into it! Here are some pics.
    http://smilebox.com/playBlog/4d6a413...&blogview=true

    WOW photos!!!! Just...WOW!



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jun. 21, 2007
    Posts
    54

    Default

    I too have sheep and trial my border collies. I have hair sheep. The feet are really hard to take care of, you just have to keep up with it. And learn to recongnize when sheep are showing signs of worm infestations. There are sheep producer forums online and most sheep people are willing to help out others. I know I have a great mentor who I can call anytime for a "stupid" question I may have.
    Some sheep are harder to keep than others, some require minimal effort. Just like horses! I find my sheep much easier to take care of than horses!



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