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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr. 28, 2008
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    Default FINALLY RESOLVED! Rain rot in very cold weather -- update

    My new weanling just came home with some scabby nastiness deep in his skin that I think must be rainrot.

    I've never actually dealt with rainrot -- ugh, in all my 20 years of horse ownership we've never really had any skin problems. I rubbed some betadine and some Microtek gel in. I would give him a bath and scrub off the scabs, but it seems way too cold -- in the 30s. I don't have hot water at the barn.

    Any advice? The scabs do seem painful to pick. I need to get them cleared up and will bathe him if I have to -- I have my eye on a warm spell early next week in the forecast.

    And do I need to worry about my other horses? I usually have communal brushes but obviously with this issue he has his "own" that I am not using on any others. What else should I be thinking about?
    Last edited by fordtraktor; Jan. 21, 2011 at 08:40 PM.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar. 23, 2010
    Posts
    663

    Default

    My new mare had rain rot. I just groomed as usual and used Vetericyn daily for a week or so. It all cleared up without having to pick at the scabs or anything gross! It's pricey, but it worked!



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov. 25, 2001
    Location
    VA
    Posts
    3,087

    Default

    Yuck, poor little guy! I've had good luck rubbing Eqyss MicroTek gel in right down to the skin followed by a good dusting of Gold Bond powder. In 24-48 hours, gently curry with a jelly scrubber and reapply. Repeat till gone.
    Please don't try to be a voice of reason. It's way more fun to spin things out of control. #BecauseCOTH - showhorsegallery



  4. #4
    Join Date
    May. 22, 2003
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    9,625

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by fordtraktor View Post
    I rubbed some betadine and some Microtek gel in.
    Be careful using Micro Tek with Betadine -- it can cause blistering. I think there is a warning on the Micro Tek bottle to that effect, too. I've seen the combination of the two cause nasty reactions.

    Don't share saddle pads, wraps, boots, brushes (like you're doing), etc. I would also wash my hands after handling the horse with rain rot and before handling any other horses, but I am a bit paranoid about skin issues.

    I've found the Micro Tek shampoo + the spray to be very effective at treating skin nasties. I'd also be sure to keep the affected areas dry (towel dry thoroughly after each bathing if you do bathe). I also try to curry the scabs to the extent the horse allows it. I like to use those jelly scrubbers to really work the shampoo into the affected areas and help work off some of the loose scabs.

    Good luck. Skin issues can be frustrating!



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep. 20, 2010
    Location
    United States of Absurdistan
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    1,736

    Default

    My gelding used to get rain rot every year. I always curry it well to get rid of scabs that want to come up. Then spray liberally with a very weak bleach water, 1 tsp bleach to 1 qt warm water. Repeat daily.
    My BO does this,and has used it on dozens of horses.
    You don't need to be able to smell it, for it to work. I've always found this clears it up in no time flat. It doesn't have any discolouring effects, and I've never known a horse to find that the mix stings.
    To prevent RR every year, I mix about 2 tbsp Tea Tree Oil in about 1 qt mineral oil. Apply heavily and curry in very well. The TTO kills the bacteria.

    Good Luck

    LBR
    I reject your reality, and substitute my own- Adam Savage

    R.I.P Ron Smith, you'll be greatly missed



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun. 22, 2008
    Location
    Outside Ocala FL - Horse Capital of the World
    Posts
    6,190

    Default

    Get some Equiderma, you will not have to bathe or pick, just apply once every other day, and it should be cleared up by the second application. I am not exagerating, it really does work that well, and that fast.

    http://www.equiderma.com/store/produ...products_id=33
    There are friends and faces that may be forgotten, but there are horses that never will be. - Andy Adams



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug. 5, 2006
    Posts
    5,046

    Default

    Derma Cloths are also very good for fungus.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar. 13, 2007
    Location
    Northern Virginia, 45 minutes east of paradise - 2 hrs during rush hour
    Posts
    2,389

    Default

    I second the microtek spray for when you can't bathe. Always works wonders for me.
    "The mighty oak is a nut who stood its ground"

    "...you'll never win Olympic gold by shaking a carrot stick at a warmblood..." see u at x



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr. 28, 2008
    Posts
    7,547

    Default

    Thanks for this warning!!! I did not notice that and really appreciate the heads up. Seems fine so far but I will not be remixing those two.

    Quote Originally Posted by Phaxxton View Post
    Be careful using Micro Tek with Betadine -- it can cause blistering. I think there is a warning on the Micro Tek bottle to that effect, too. I've seen the combination of the two cause nasty reactions.

    Don't share saddle pads, wraps, boots, brushes (like you're doing), etc. I would also wash my hands after handling the horse with rain rot and before handling any other horses, but I am a bit paranoid about skin issues.

    I've found the Micro Tek shampoo + the spray to be very effective at treating skin nasties. I'd also be sure to keep the affected areas dry (towel dry thoroughly after each bathing if you do bathe). I also try to curry the scabs to the extent the horse allows it. I like to use those jelly scrubbers to really work the shampoo into the affected areas and help work off some of the loose scabs.

    Good luck. Skin issues can be frustrating!



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb. 4, 2009
    Posts
    2,460

    Default

    I've had good success with MTG. I've always been lucky enough to catch it in the early stages so I'm only putting it on small areas. Some horses are sensitive to MTG so I'd try a small test spot first and check for a reaction before using it on a larger area.

    Clears it up in just a day or two.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar. 10, 2003
    Location
    Massachusetts, USA
    Posts
    3,503

    Default

    Gold Bond Medicated Foot Powder. Best treatment (other than to systemically address the symptoms) I've found. Curry, comb with cheap plastic man's comb, pick scabs, dust with Foot Powder while brushing fur in opposite direction to growth so powder gets down to skin. No water in cold weather. Powder inside of blankets etc. as well. Keep grooming tools sanitized (Rinse with bleach/water after each use) ...

    Treat systemically with good, forage based live diet containing immune system strengtheners.
    --Gwen <><
    "Treat others as you want to be treated and be the change you want to see in the world."
    http://www.thepenzancehorse.com



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Nov. 22, 2010
    Posts
    2

    Default Rain Rot

    Hello, I represent Vetericyn and would like to provide you with some information. Typically, rain rot is caused by an infection from dermatophilus congolensis. This organism is similar to a bacteria and a fungus. Vetericyn works by increasing oxygen at the area it's applied to. Clinical data shows this destroys most bacteria, viruses, and fungi within 30 seconds of contact, so Vetericyn should be very effective at treating and speeding the healing process of rain rot. If you have further questions, please do not hesitate to call our toll free number 866-318-3116 or visit us online at www.vetericyn.com.
    We are on Facebook and Twitter!
    http://www.facebook.com/vetericyn
    http://twitter.com/vetericyn



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Feb. 6, 2008
    Location
    PA
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    587

    Default

    I've used the generic Gold Bond powder with great success. I like it in the cold weather because you're not wetting the coat. Curry to loosen scabs and then apply the powder. I've dumped it in the curry and then rubbed it in.



  14. #14
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    Aug. 4, 2009
    Location
    MD
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    4,174

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mswillie View Post
    I've had good success with MTG. I've always been lucky enough to catch it in the early stages so I'm only putting it on small areas. Some horses are sensitive to MTG so I'd try a small test spot first and check for a reaction before using it on a larger area.

    Clears it up in just a day or two.
    Second the MTG or Banaex, MTG is amazing smells like Bacon.
    Shake well squirt on in spmall patches work in well with fingers. Scabs lift off in a few days.



  15. #15
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    Apr. 28, 2008
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    Microtek people -- how long until you see improvement? We are on day 4, with nuthin'. I wouldn't say it is necessarily worse, but it sure isn't better. Nothing is lifting off. It got up to 60 today so I gave him a bath, and I couldn't even loosen the scabs. It obviously hurts them if I pick them off so I stopped.

    This is nasty stuff. It isn't weepy or anything, just hard scabs deep in his baby fur. Does that sound like rainrot?

    Will pick up some Gold Bond tomorrow and try that for a few days.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Apr. 23, 2005
    Posts
    1,218

    Default

    fordtraktor, I'm in the same boat. It was suggested by a vet to use Ivermectin pour on to get rid of rain rot - apparently it works wonders and clears up even the worst cases in days. Well, I applied that on Friday and I have to say, not much change. Some flakies, but still a lot of deep, hard scabs like you're describing. And definitely very ouchy to touch; currying won't take them off, I would have to go one by one with my fingernails.

    I had my [new] vet out a few weeks ago for a check up and teeth floating, and she confirmed it to be rain rot. Problem is, what she gave me was betadine scrub and Imaverol... and Imaverol needs to be applied wet. Well, I'm in Eastern Canada, and it's awfully cold. Water bucket freezing cold. So I gave her one bath and Imaverol application right after the vet visit as it warmed up a bit, but haven't been able to do another, and I don't anticipate being able to until spring.

    My [new] vet tells me that it's hard to get rid of at this time of year because of their thick coats and the inability to bathe regularly, and I may have to wait until spring to get rid of it. That may be the case, but I'm willing to try pretty much anything to get rid of it... I don't want my poor girl suffering through this all winter.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jul. 14, 2000
    Location
    midwest
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    10,620

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    Sunlight and air will remove the environment which allows rainrot/scratches to thrive which is dark and moist. Clip if at all possible. My mare has some places on either side of her withers which were not responding to regular treatment so today I clipped away the hair in those places. Scrubbed the area with clorohex/water solution- a little less harsher on the skin than betadine. Then I sprayed it with Vetericyn. I'll do this daily for at least a week. And yes, I will use a clean pad for each ride until this is gone.

    When I was treating a horrible, horrible, completely covered my colts body case of rain rot (thank you very much Mr. Trainer for neglecting to groom my colt while at your barn for a month ) this past April I did a full body clip and a daily bath. My vet advised that once the sores were closed to spray a little rubbing alcohol over the colt. The alcohol acts like an astringent.



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Jun. 16, 2007
    Posts
    1,899

    Default Winter

    I had rain rot in the circumstances you have and I spot washed the top of her butt with MicroTek Shampoo and used the MicroTek Spray as instructed on the bottle. After that I just curried daily with a new uncontaminated curry. Did not need a second treatment. If it is a sunny day I wouldn't worry about spot washing at 30 degrees. I would also spot wash to get the Betadine off if I were you. Vets must get a cut of Betadine sales...it is nasty stuff and not very effective in most situations. You are changing the environment but breaking apart the hair clumps and then using something to change the pH of the skin to something the bacteria can't live at. Healthy skin is the preventative. The problem is the typical baby winter coay is so fluffy and dense it doesn't dry before the bacteria gets a hold. PatO



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Apr. 23, 2005
    Posts
    1,218

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    I would like to avoid body clipping my young mare but am starting to seriously consider going that route. Just started browsing some winter blankets online.

    I will give it another week or two of treatments (going to pick up the Gold Bond tomorrow), but with how completely she's covered (she even has some in the inside of her poor little ears) and how bad it is (big, deep scabs... even her legs are warm to the touch from it), I think she might have to learn about clippers and blankets...



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Feb. 6, 2003
    Location
    Deep South
    Posts
    14,919

    Default

    NOLVASAN, NOLVASAN, NOLVASAN solution in the bucket with the shampoo.

    There REALLY needs to be a rain rot sticky compilation of ALL the threads on the subject.

    If it's too cold, mix the Nolvasan solution with water and spray on to the coat until soaked, and rub it in down to the skin with a small towel.
    ... _. ._ .._. .._



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