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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug. 26, 2003
    Location
    The good 'ole State of denial
    Posts
    5,064

    Default Any quick easy tricks to hock wraps?

    I've got to wrap for 3 weeks, after which I was told (by a surgeon) to use pantyhose with elasticon.

    I've had to change daily, still on week 1 - because they either slide down or explode out the point of the hock in the back. She is active in the stall, and likes to scratch them on anything and everything.

    I've tried the full leg wrap, as well as just the hock area, tried cotton/cling/vetwrap/elasticon, tried cutting the cotton to fit the hock better, etc. What it boils down to is me spending a ton of time fidgeting with a wrap on a high energy yearling on stall rest, and going out the next day to find out what I tried again failed to hold for even 24/hours (incidentally the wrap from the hospital exploded as well).

    Is there ANYTHING easy and QUICK that would do the same job? I get so frustrated when I'm almost done with the cling and she flings her leg back and I lose hold and it unravels like toilet paper - and then I have to start from scratch again.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    May. 24, 2006
    Posts
    2,896

    Default

    I know this is going to sound weird, but I was in your position once, could not get it to stay and finally in desperation used superglue...byt he time the week was done, the super glue had worn off. I only used a small amount, but it did hold my active mares bandage in place.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    May. 5, 2009
    Location
    Location: Indiana, but my heart is in Zone II
    Posts
    2,815

    Default

    Is there a reason you can't use a neoprene wrap? Roma makes one for $20 and I used it when my filly had an injury I needed to keep clean. It worked awesome. ( I put a stockingette and bandage around it first. )

    If not, how about a good old ACE bandage?
    Come to the dark side, we have cookies



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug. 26, 2003
    Location
    The good 'ole State of denial
    Posts
    5,064

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Pennywell Bay View Post
    Is there a reason you can't use a neoprene wrap? Roma makes one for $20 and I used it when my filly had an injury I needed to keep clean. It worked awesome. ( I put a stockingette and bandage around it first. )

    If not, how about a good old ACE bandage?
    My vet recommened I not use the neoprene wraps.

    My next attempt will be the cling and vetwrap without the cotton...something will work. I have faith, lol. Superglue...my luck I'd glue my hand to her leg



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb. 23, 2005
    Location
    Harrisburg, PA
    Posts
    139

    Default

    Look up Spider Bandage on the internet. You can make one yourself out of an old towel or I think now they sell something. I always use the towel as I think it holds better and just throw it away when it gets too yucky. Works great stays in place. Hopefully an old timer can show you how to do one. It is hard to explain over the internet, if you lived near Harrisburg PA i would show you. Worked great last year on a boarders horse for a couple of weeks.
    jess

    p.s. I just realized you are not that far from me. I am going to be at Halcyon Farm today at a horse show. YOu are welcome to come there and I can show you. Easy and cheap and stays in place. I learned it from an old time horseman that unfortunately I am sure is long time gone. 717 877 7472. Bring some towels!!



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun. 12, 2007
    Location
    CT
    Posts
    5,992

    Default

    Sadly the quick solutions rarely work. Start with a standing bandage on the lower leg. Then put either a spider bandage, or properly wrapped figure 8 bandage over the top. If you need pictures, google the bandage names with pony club. They have lots of instruction sets. Should hold for 24 hours easily.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan. 6, 2003
    Location
    CT
    Posts
    3,516

    Default

    I worked for an equine hospital a few years. Here's what we did for hock wraps.. essentially stack wraps.

    Standing bandage below. Then, on the hock itself, dress the wound, then a telfa or sterile 4x4 (or surgi pads) or few directly over the wound. Next a layer of softband to hold 4x4's in place. Then, a layer of expandover (mildly adhesive, accordian style wide sticky tape). Catch at least an inch or two of hair coat/ skin above and below the softband.

    Next, 5, yes, five layers of BB satin star 'bandages' over the hock. You'll lay 4 of them flat, fold the stack in half, then use the 5th to enclose the open ends of the 4, folded in the opposite direction -if that makes any sense. Use this 'bandage' around the hock, starting inside gaskin/ hock to out. It's very forgiving where it bunches together, hence the reason for using the BB satin star instead of a regular standing bandage quilt.

    Then, a layer of brown gauze. I dont' know how to describe this, other than they come prepackaged from the 'field packs' from the manufacturer. They're about 5" wide, pretty flimsy, and tear easily so apply even, VERY firm pressure. You'll probably need 2 rolls to wrap a typical hock, because you're going to continue over the BB on down over your standing bandage by several inches. Most important part is to keep pressure even across the width of the gauze, and tension firm down the full length of the bandage.

    Vetwrap covers the brown gauze. Again, keeping even pressure. Have a few on back up because until you get the tension right, they'll rip right in your hand and you'll be a frustrated mo' fo' while your underbandage unravels as you open a new roll. Ask me how I know.

    Finish your hock wrap with several turns of elastikon at the top and bottom of the bandage where it goes over your standing wrap.

    It's best to make a 1/2" slit at the hock to help alleviate some of the discomfort. It may sound like this will cause the easy destruction of all your hard work, but if the bandage is performed properly, and the split placed right, it'll hold.

    We used to wrap all types in this hock bandage and *most* them held for at least 2 days.

    Your results may vary. Good luck.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec. 6, 2000
    Location
    SE Mass
    Posts
    4,229

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Sansena View Post
    I worked for an equine hospital a few years. Here's what we did for hock wraps.. essentially stack wraps.

    Standing bandage below. Then, on the hock itself, dress the wound, then a telfa or sterile 4x4 (or surgi pads) or few directly over the wound. Next a layer of softband to hold 4x4's in place. Then, a layer of expandover (mildly adhesive, accordian style wide sticky tape). Catch at least an inch or two of hair coat/ skin above and below the softband.

    Next, 5, yes, five layers of BB satin star 'bandages' over the hock. You'll lay 4 of them flat, fold the stack in half, then use the 5th to enclose the open ends of the 4, folded in the opposite direction -if that makes any sense. Use this 'bandage' around the hock, starting inside gaskin/ hock to out. It's very forgiving where it bunches together, hence the reason for using the BB satin star instead of a regular standing bandage quilt.

    Then, a layer of brown gauze. I dont' know how to describe this, other than they come prepackaged from the 'field packs' from the manufacturer. They're about 5" wide, pretty flimsy, and tear easily so apply even, VERY firm pressure. You'll probably need 2 rolls to wrap a typical hock, because you're going to continue over the BB on down over your standing bandage by several inches. Most important part is to keep pressure even across the width of the gauze, and tension firm down the full length of the bandage.

    Vetwrap covers the brown gauze. Again, keeping even pressure. Have a few on back up because until you get the tension right, they'll rip right in your hand and you'll be a frustrated mo' fo' while your underbandage unravels as you open a new roll. Ask me how I know.

    Finish your hock wrap with several turns of elastikon at the top and bottom of the bandage where it goes over your standing wrap.

    It's best to make a 1/2" slit at the hock to help alleviate some of the discomfort. It may sound like this will cause the easy destruction of all your hard work, but if the bandage is performed properly, and the split placed right, it'll hold.

    We used to wrap all types in this hock bandage and *most* them held for at least 2 days.

    Your results may vary. Good luck.
    What she said. The standing bandage has to be on first. Then the figure 8 using cottons, not standard bandages, then elastikon. Before I figured this out, I was nearly in tears. And my horse kept the get up on through 24/7 turnout because we didn't want adhesions to form.

    Good luck!



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul. 6, 2005
    Location
    Aiken, SC
    Posts
    1,540

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bedrock View Post
    Look up Spider Bandage on the internet. You can make one yourself out of an old towel or I think now they sell something. I always use the towel as I think it holds better
    I like to use a terrycloth towel as padding and a spider bandage made out of an old sweatshirt. The sweatshirt material has the perfect amount of stretchiness. Also, I like to tie the top, bottom, and sometimes middle strands (only if the horse is really aggressive about trying to get the thing off), but I braid the others.

    ETA: I agree that the standing wrap has to be on first.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep. 14, 2000
    Location
    Goochland, VA
    Posts
    8,571

    Default

    Another vote for the spider bandage, which is becoming a lost art. And agree on something like sweatshirt material for the hock because of the added stretch.
    Laurie
    Finding, preparing, showing and training young hunters, in hand and performance.
    www.juniorjohnsontrainingandsales.com



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Apr. 10, 2008
    Posts
    669

    Default

    I usually put a piece of Elasticon directly on the skin above the hock - this will stay there until you are don bandaging. Then cover the wound with Telfa pad, put cling on to hold that on and then cover the entire hock (above and below) with Elasticon. You shouldn't stretch the Elasticon as you are applying it, just lay it on.

    If she is rubbing it on things - rubbing her legs together, put duct tape over the whole bandage and smear it with vaseline. If she's biting it, load the vaseline with cayenne (and put a little in her mouth the first time so she will know the smell).



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Sep. 25, 2003
    Location
    CT
    Posts
    309

    Default

    Just a quick note here. I've heard that you can buy nursing pads (used by women who are nursing to stick in their bra) and they fit very snugly over a hock as a bandage. This would replace any time of gauze type of product. Other than that I agree with the stacked bandage approach. Good Luck!



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