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  1. #21
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    Nov. 12, 2010
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    I've looked at quite a few pics on the internet and all yours... and she definately could be any one of the above mentioned things. I think I'll do a test and see
    It's odd that she didn't get any white markings, as the stallion carries quite a lot of it.

    I fetched her on Monday and took a couple pics before we loaded her, she has a few bite marks... apparently the herd, including the stallion cast her out, which is a little strange... She's only a year and a half!

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/mustlovehorses/5184436756/



  2. #22
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    Jul. 27, 2005
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    Is it normal for Buckskins or Buckskins going gray to not have black points? She is a cutie. Good Luck with her.
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  3. #23
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    Dec. 13, 1999
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    Greensboro, NC
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    Depends on what you mean by "black point".

    A "wild buckskin" - wild bay with cream - could have such low leg points as to not be very noticable.

    A smoky brown - brown with cream instead of bay w/ cream - could have points that are, well, brown instead of black They could also have black points - don't HAVE to be brown.

    Silver can dilute the points to not be (as) black looking.
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



  4. #24
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    Thanks JB. You are such a wealth of knowledge. I know with my silver buckskin mare that her points were "brown" but wasn't sure if the graying would have the same effect. I am going to have to look up some pictures. Very interesting. I love all of the different possibilities of coat color there are. Thanks for the info
    Worth A Shot Farm
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  5. #25
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    Dec. 13, 1999
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    Silver is very good at toning down the black points. In extremes, it takes the mane and tail all the way to white/silver, though it doesn't do that to the legs or body).
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



  6. #26
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    Sep. 20, 2010
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    I've always heard that if the foal is black based, bay or buckskin, and is born with dark legs, they will go grey sooner or later. If the are born with light legs, they will stay bay or buckskin.

    She is a cutie in that last shot! But what a head!

    LBR
    I reject your reality, and substitute my own- Adam Savage

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  7. #27
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    Dec. 13, 1999
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    Quote Originally Posted by ladybugred View Post
    I've always heard that if the foal is black based, bay or buckskin, and is born with dark legs, they will go grey sooner or later. If the are born with light legs, they will stay bay or buckskin.
    Yep, that's pretty reliable. The more general wording is that if the foal is born with the adult-looking color, nearly guaranteed he'll go gray. So, for the bays, this means black legs instead of tan/mousy. For black horses, it means a black foal instead of mousy gray. For chestnuts, it means, well, chestnut instead of "pink" with light legs.

    The reason is the graying process is already underway, and the first thing it does is darken the color.
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



  8. #28
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    Nov. 12, 2010
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    Default Test Results are back...

    Well, these results are interesting... no cream, no agouti and ee! Surely that's impossible - she doesn't look chestnut based.

    At the same time, I sent off to UC Davies for a Champagne test (on the off chance), just because her 'palomino' sire has a very metallic sheen and reverse dapples (and pinky privates). Would you believe that the she has 1 champagne gene... so her sire is a champagne and not a pally.

    So according to the ee result, she is a gold champagne? Is the red factor test easy to get wrong? She looks like a classic champagne to me?

    The genetics lab people are on leave until Jan... They obviously clicked send on my test results report and ran out the door... because I phoned them right away, but reception informed me that they had already left for the holidays! ha!

    more pics... 8 new photos on my 'photostream'

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/mustlovehorses/5246504329/



  9. #29
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    Jan. 22, 2006
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    Did you test for grey though? You said her dam was grey right? Greying can change the tone of the colors pretty easily. The newer pictures do show more of a redish tone than the first pictures you posted though. Really cool findings though!

    ETA: She really does look much more like the classic or amber champagne color versus the gold, and I have no idea how often the test results are wrong or get mixed up. I have never had one to get tested! My horses are usually just plain old chestnut and nothing exciting!



  10. #30
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    Aug. 2, 2005
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    Oak Harbor
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    Where did you get her tested at??
    Check out my Equine Genetics Blog! Updated April 25th with Splashed White!!!
    http://equinegenetics.blogspot.com/



  11. #31
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    Jun. 14, 2010
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    PaulaJane - that's pretty exciting! I wondered when I saw those pics if he was champagne. You're in South Africa, right? Who owns the stallion? I didn't know we had any champagne horses in the country.. or that it existed in Boerperde (if he's purebred).



  12. #32
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    Jan. 2, 2010
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    Columbia, SC
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    How VERY cool! Who'd have thought chestnut. I guess if you look here through the fetlocks it makes it very believable.

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/mustlov...n/photostream/

    She's a gorgeous little thing, congrats to you!



  13. #33
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    The horse didn't test chestnut. She tested gold champagne.
    Check out my Equine Genetics Blog! Updated April 25th with Splashed White!!!
    http://equinegenetics.blogspot.com/



  14. #34
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    Apr. 2, 2006
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    ee IS a chestnut base. It seems she has additional modifiers changing the color.

    If she has a grey parent, she's got a 50% chance at being grey on top of everything else. There are different shades of chestnut so my guess is her base color is dark liver chestnut. ??

    Keep posting pics as she sheds out.



  15. #35
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    Mar. 9, 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by RiddleMeThis View Post
    The horse didn't test chestnut. She tested gold champagne.
    Yes she DID test chestnut, ee means a chestnut BASE upon which the other genes are acting, which is quite surprising given the "points" I wonder if she is liver ee (don't know if there is a test that differentiates liver) since I have seen some livers with "points" i.e. darker mane tail and legs. But VERY interesting!



  16. #36
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    The point RMT was making is that "Who'd have thought chestnut." isn't really correct. I know what irken meant - chestnut-based. But they aren't the same

    And no, there isn't anything available to test for liver, which is just a shade of chestnut
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



  17. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by JB View Post
    I know what irken meant - chestnut-based. But they aren't the same
    Exactly. Having a chestnut base is NOT the same as "being chestnut."

    She did NOT test "chestnut" she tested red based + champagne. To VERY different things.
    Check out my Equine Genetics Blog! Updated April 25th with Splashed White!!!
    http://equinegenetics.blogspot.com/



  18. #38
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    ee IS the genetic code for chestnut. She has modifers that alter her base color.

    Let's asseme she IS liver for a second. The resultant color woild be different if she had a bright chestnut base. So I think the chestnut shade is having an effect on her current color.



  19. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by back in the saddle View Post
    ee IS the genetic code for chestnut. She has modifers that alter her base color.
    And that is exactly my point. She has a chestnut BASE. She is NOT chestnut. They are two different things.
    Check out my Equine Genetics Blog! Updated April 25th with Splashed White!!!
    http://equinegenetics.blogspot.com/



  20. #40
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    Dec. 27, 2006
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    That is very interesting. I did not even consider champagne. Gray can do very strange things to a red-based coat. I hope the owner did test her for gray in addition to champagne. Although time will tell if gray is at work.

    Gray can make the coat VERY dark before lightening up to white. This AQHA stallion is a gray palomino:

    http://members.iowatelecom.net/foste...mokey1-OPT.jpg

    I owned a Quarter Horse stallion that was a gray palomino as well. He was a very typical golden palomino color as a weanling. That changed very quickly however. By the time he was a yearling his lower legs and hindquarters were a very dark, very dappled liver chestnut color. Drastically darker than the rest of his body. His mane and tail were both very dark silver. By the time he was three years old he was nearly white.
    We are all inclined to judge ourselves by our ideals; others, by their acts. ~Harold Nicolson



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