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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov. 2, 2001
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    In Jingle Town
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    Default The flask and bread box question

    I know, I should jut search, but I am drawing a blank.
    putting up dishes I stumbled over a collection of flasks that have accumulated over the last few years. At one point hubby had complained there were non to be had, so it seems everytime somebody sees one it's bought for him.

    those are not hunting items, mind you

    But here is the question:
    The flask you carry, how big is it and is it mandatory it fits into the holder on the saddle? (what do you put in it, I heard for shows there is a strict code as to what can be carried, like crustless sandwiches with turkey but no condiments. could I put a slice of cheese on there?)

    are general purpose flasks that can be slipped in a jacket pocket carried in the field?

    I don't see even hilltoping in the near or far future for me. Plus, I'd be the only person bringing a pack mule to the meet, because I just can't stand the idea of not being prepared for all eventualities...
    Quote Originally Posted by Bristol Bay View Post
    Try setting your broomstick to fly at a lower altitude.
    GNU Terry Prachett



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb. 6, 2003
    Location
    Deep South
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    Default

    It depends if you are male or female. If you aren't entering an appointments class, nobody will check or care what you have in/on there.
    Traditional;
    Men = Conical glass flask in leather case and seperate sandwich case, with metal sandwich box.
    Ladies = Leather case containing small glass flask and metal sandwich box.

    Non Traditional = Big honking flask in your jacket pocket. (filled with your favourite warming tipple)

    If you just HAVE to be a traditionalist, you can still carry an additional flask in your pocket. (frock coats have huge pockets)
    ... _. ._ .._. .._



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep. 30, 2007
    Location
    Missouri
    Posts
    35

    Default

    Equibrit is right - which makes me Nontraditional.

    I carry a tall, thin flask that perfectly fits in my hunt coat pocket, and have a smaller one tucked away in another pocket for emergencies or for when our Huntsman and Master get that "now where is my flask" look in their eye!



  4. #4
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    Nov. 2, 2001
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    In Jingle Town
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by justagreen View Post
    Equibrit is right - which makes me Nontraditional.

    I carry a tall, thin flask that perfectly fits in my hunt coat pocket, and have a smaller one tucked away in another pocket for emergencies or for when our Huntsman and Master get that "now where is my flask" look in their eye!
    Gets you on their good side for sure!

    now, what do you pack? the turkey without mustard?
    What about the drink? (I think I would have to discover Seagram's sweet tea if tea was I I got to carry...)
    Quote Originally Posted by Bristol Bay View Post
    Try setting your broomstick to fly at a lower altitude.
    GNU Terry Prachett



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug. 13, 2003
    Location
    California USA
    Posts
    740

    Default

    Equibrit is right on with her post.
    However the lady's sandwich case and flask were for formal wear. Same with the men's. But over the years they have been made a part of the appointments class.
    If you are going to use one make sure it is the correct one for who is riding.
    A proper flask for the lady's sandwich case is much different from the men's.
    Research before you buy.
    The flasks are hard to find so use care if you have one.
    Back in the "Day" in Britain there was a class called "Corinthian Hunters".
    It was Ultra Formal. I have been out of the showing for a long time so I don't know if there are still such classes today. Sometimes in the old magazines like "Country Life" there will be photos of riders decked out in their very best formal Hunting attire and tack. Such are so neat to see.
    sadlmakr



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct. 18, 2000
    Posts
    22,489

    Default

    I carry a flask in my pocket. Sandwich case contains a multipurpose tool, clotting kit, and baling twine.
    Brothers and sisters, I bid you beware
    Of giving your heart to a dog to tear.
    -Rudyard Kipling



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec. 7, 2001
    Location
    Cullowhere?, NC
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    8,694

    Default

    (JSwan has been knows to chew on the baling twine in a pinch for nutrition. Very multi-functional girl, our JSwan).
    "One person's cowboy is another person's blooming idiot" -- katarine

    Spay and neuter. Please.



  8. #8
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    Nov. 2, 2001
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    In Jingle Town
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JSwan View Post
    I carry a flask in my pocket. Sandwich case contains a multipurpose tool, clotting kit, and baling twine.
    me thinks I should send you the link to the tiny survival kid a Boy Scout dad found on the net!
    http://www.troop149mchenry.org/MiniPSK.htm
    Quote Originally Posted by Bristol Bay View Post
    Try setting your broomstick to fly at a lower altitude.
    GNU Terry Prachett



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep. 18, 2000
    Location
    Tatertown, KY, USA
    Posts
    1,888

    Default

    In this area, tradition has yielded to function, and a very popular option, for both men and women, is a plastic travel flask in a leather case attached to saddle, like this

    http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?pi...bd&id=12904532

    12 oz and 16 oz sizes are popular, and in some deference to gender stereotyping, it seems that the dainty size is more popular with women.

    The plastic flasks are much less expensive, and much less breakable, than the expensive traditional crystal flasks.

    Pocket flasks (commonly 6 ounces) are also popular. Due to their smaller size, their contents are usually more concentrated. My pocket flask carries straight bourbon; my saddle flask carries a locally popular elixir called rocknrye.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul. 14, 2000
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    midwest
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    11,156

    Default

    During a check today we were discussing the fact that our metal flask inflict a poor flavor on the contents. There is nothing like a good glass flask or in the absence of one, a proper 6oz water bottle like the one bequeathed to me a couple seasons ago from a long time member.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jul. 5, 2007
    Location
    Beside Myself ~ Western NY
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    9,148

    Default

    Isn't it 'bout time for a "What's in your flask" thread?

    If I ever get out there, I'm bringing Glogg. Two parts Spiced Tawny Port and one part 190 Everclear. That'll keep your toes warm.

    I sure wouldn't pack anything real good in anything but glass.
    People are crazy and times are strange.
    I used to care but, things have changed.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb. 6, 2003
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    Deep South
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    Default

    ALWAYS make sure thet the lid of your flask is attached to the neck when open.
    ... _. ._ .._. .._



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Feb. 9, 2006
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    Default

    Bugger the soggy sandwiches Instead, double-up the amounts when you make your Christmas cake, and bake in a square tin.

    Talk nicely to your vet so s/he gives you a syringe with a nice needle, inject your cake liberally and lovingly with your favourite booze (you will be AMAZED how much liquor a good fruit cake can hold), slice to the size of your sandwich tin, wrap the slices in grease-proof paper or a paper towel, and away you go, hic.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    May. 12, 2008
    Location
    Rocky Point Farm
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    252

    Default

    I haven't had anybody check the contents of my sandwich box since the old Post Time shows under the trees at Keeneland a hundred years ago.
    These days my kit is very traditional; flask at the left front filled with bourbon, sandwich box at the right hind. The sandwich box holds two Pop Tarts (perfectly!) and a couple of horse cookies.
    I just can't bring myself to carry anything much in my pockets. Stuff happens - I fall off. I can just see myself trying to explain a flask-shaped contusion in the Trauma Center (where I work).



  15. #15
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    Oct. 18, 2000
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SLW View Post
    During a check today we were discussing the fact that our metal flask inflict a poor flavor on the contents.
    Well, there's your problem!

    Don't you know it's bad luck to go in without emptying your flask!!!?????
    Brothers and sisters, I bid you beware
    Of giving your heart to a dog to tear.
    -Rudyard Kipling



  16. #16
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    Feb. 9, 2006
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JSwan View Post
    Well, there's your problem!

    Don't you know it's bad luck to go in without emptying your flask!!!?????
    Seconded - mine's usually empty by the time the Hunt is over, and if not, it still manages to be empty by the time we've hacked home.

    I do try to remember and rinse it out and leave it to dry, too. All that sugar n booze is pretty corosive, I suspect.

    Mine is around 8 fl oz, I think: 16 oz - wow!
    Last edited by Romany; Nov. 12, 2010 at 05:53 PM. Reason: Lapse of memory due to ingesting wine from plastic bottle



  17. #17
    Join Date
    May. 25, 2003
    Location
    Orlean, Virginia
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    Thumbs up Loved it!

    Oh Romany! You busted me up with the injected fruitcake idear! Yup! That'll work!!! Loved it and it oh-so-ladylike to offer a fellow hunter a piece of treated cake! Just smile and bat your eyes!

    Spoke to a hunting lady yesterday who was frantically retrieving her flask for her pocket just before mounting up...says she has a mixture of 3 things in it....and that it DOES take some mixing and tasting to get her concoction totally just right!! I wanna be there for the mixing & tasting!!!



  18. #18
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    Feb. 6, 2003
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    Deep South
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    Default

    That is standard fare in the UK for fruit cake. I have my christmas cake in a tin "pickling" in sherry/brandy right now. My Mum used to shoot up the cake for 6 months.
    ... _. ._ .._. .._



  19. #19
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    Nov. 2, 2001
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    Quote Originally Posted by Equibrit View Post
    That is standard fare in the UK for fruit cake. I have my christmas cake in a tin "pickling" in sherry/brandy right now. My Mum used to shoot up the cake for 6 months.
    LOL, so keep all the fruit cake you get for Christmas, in mid summer start 'legging it up'?
    Quote Originally Posted by Bristol Bay View Post
    Try setting your broomstick to fly at a lower altitude.
    GNU Terry Prachett



  20. #20
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    Nov. 2, 2001
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    Quote Originally Posted by Romany View Post
    Bugger the soggy sandwiches Instead, double-up the amounts when you make your Christmas cake, and bake in a square tin.

    Talk nicely to your vet so s/he gives you a syringe with a nice needle, inject your cake liberally and lovingly with your favourite booze (you will be AMAZED how much liquor a good fruit cake can hold), slice to the size of your sandwich tin, wrap the slices in grease-proof paper or a paper towel, and away you go, hic.

    you know, you can get those syringes in the cooking aisle especially now in time for turkey time...
    (but I can imagine y'all in scrubs on a sterile kitchen counter, 'operating' on fruit cake...)
    Quote Originally Posted by Bristol Bay View Post
    Try setting your broomstick to fly at a lower altitude.
    GNU Terry Prachett



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