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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug. 7, 2005
    Location
    Georgia
    Posts
    2,616

    Default Is nature confused?

    Here it is Nov. and we've been reaching near freezing temps at night and I'm pulling TICKS off of the dogs and cats!! They're dead when I pull them off (frontline) but still...in Nov.?
    To top it all off my dog killed a six inch pygmy rattler yesterday. What the heck is a self respecting snake doing out in the cold??
    I really thought we were done with these critters until next spring. Guess not.
    You know why cowboys don't like Appaloosas?" - Answer: Because to train a horse, you have to be smarter than it is.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb. 16, 2003
    Location
    MI USA
    Posts
    8,977

    Default

    Sun is warm enough each day here to get the insects flying. Bugs just pull their heads in, wait out the cold to get on the pets when sun warms them up. We don't have snakes out, but the frogs are still swimming in the fish pond, sitting on the rocks eating bugs daily.

    Everyone wants to go into winter/hibernation fat, so they stay out eating, reproducing as long as possible. The ticks would creep me out, are you SURE they are dead, not just chilled?\

    I am just enjoying the nice weather we have, last year it was much colder and snowing. Actually have all winterizing jobs about done. If the tractor would QUIT acting up, I could finish. Everyone else has no trouble with it, but she is not cooperating with me!



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct. 12, 2001
    Location
    Center of the Universe
    Posts
    7,806

    Default

    I've found ticks on dogs n horses in January and February- all it takes is a few hours of warmish weather to wake them up ready for a snack.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug. 23, 2009
    Location
    Long Island, NY
    Posts
    209

    Default

    They also tend to seek refuge in mounds of fallen leaves, which end up generating heat as they compost.
    Depending on your location, they can remain viable well into winter.
    ... It don't mean a thing if it ain't got that Shwung



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep. 25, 2005
    Location
    The Land of the Frozen
    Posts
    13,787

    Default

    I'm in the far north and my horse had anaplasmosis in October/November last year from deer ticks. Around here, we're not safe until we maintain a really hard freeze - like end of December'ish.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    55,978

    Default

    My dog was bitten by a rattler December 6 two years ago.
    I had her at the vets in 45 minutes from the bite and they told me it was the second dog bitten that day.

    My friend the vet came that night to check on her about 9:30 pm and was speeding going home later when she was stopped.
    The officer had a hard time believing she had been attending to a snake bitten dog in December, but let her go on without a ticket anyway.

    One January a few years ago we had 11 rattlers, that we know of, coming by our front door.

    I don't think that critters read the calendars to see if it is spring yet, or if they need to be holed up or not.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec. 18, 2006
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    10,302

    Default

    Oh yes, it's PRIME tick season. They are looking for a warm body for the winter. They are everywhere, and the Frontline does kill them pretty well.

    We live in a very highly populated tick area and our vets recommend Frontline all year round. In my area, places with good coverage (trees & leaf litter) ticks are active all year long.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug. 7, 2005
    Location
    Georgia
    Posts
    2,616

    Default

    Goodhors, They're dead alright or if just chilled they're so cold they are comatose (sp).

    Bluey, I hope your dog survived?
    I've never seen a full sized rattler here but we have had copper heads. That's always been a fear of mine that one of the dogs or horses would be bitten.

    Went to the hay house to get a load of hay and the outside was covered with ladybugs. Maybe they know it's winter and they're hunting a place to shelter for the winter. I hope those don't get inside but I bet they do.

    Guess I'll order more frontline.
    You know why cowboys don't like Appaloosas?" - Answer: Because to train a horse, you have to be smarter than it is.



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