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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul. 22, 2010
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    126

    Default Not Blanketing a stalled horse?

    Is it bad not to blanket a horse with a mammoth coat that is stalled at night with lows in the 40s and daytime highs in the 70's?



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar. 14, 2004
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    Left coast, left wing, left field
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    6,798

    Default

    Hahahaha! I think it would be bad TO blanket a horse in those conditions.

    In the winter here (outside of Seattle) it is apt to be 40-50 by day and 25-35 by night, and we do not blanket -- even the horses that do not grow a thick coat. The only reason I like to blanket horses in stalls is because I have a few who like nothing better than to lie down in their poop or pee pile. UGH. But most of the time I don't bother.
    Arrange whatever pieces come your way. - Virginia Woolf

    Did you know that if you say the word "GULLIBLE" really softly, it sounds like "ORANGES"?



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb. 15, 2004
    Location
    Ontario
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    Default

    I don't blanket my mare at all. She grows a very thick coat, comes in at night or stays in when the weather is really bad. She is not being ridden either. The BO does not change blankets, so I really do not want her blanketed 24/7, inside and out, and the blanket removed only when we visit her.

    Many horses at our barn do not get blanketed at all, others wear the blankets day in and day out.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan. 16, 2002
    Location
    West Coast of Michigan
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    36,321

    Default

    That is room temperature for a horse! No, I wouldn't blanket him.
    Click here before you buy.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb. 9, 2005
    Location
    Upper Midwest
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    6,349

    Default

    No.

    I only blanket horses (in MUCH colder weather) that can't grow a coat, are clipped, or are being ridden (keeps them cleaner) or just can't cope correctly due to age, sickness, etc. My exception is if the weather is damp or wet.
    Siouxland Sporthorses: http://slsfarm.blogspot.com/

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  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep. 26, 2008
    Posts
    1,303

    Default

    Since my horse is not clipped or under lights he doesn't get a blanket unless it is in the teens, he will get a waterpoof sheet for turnout if it is cold/wet/windy but usually I will just keep him in a bit longer for those conditions.

    My husbands horse is an older fella and it can be hard to keep weight on him he gets blankets when it hits freezing at nights to help him keep his weight up, he also gets a sheet for windy/ cold days.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug. 30, 2007
    Location
    Illinois, USA
    Posts
    8,308

    Default

    If my horse were stalled, I'd probably never blanket her! Definitely a-ok not to blanket.
    Tell a Gelding. Ask a Stallion. Discuss it with a Mare... Pray if it's a Pony!



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar. 4, 2007
    Location
    Western Washington
    Posts
    3,070

    Default

    No.

    If you're open to taking blanketing suggestions from a mule, check out what Fenway Bartholomule has to say:

    http://www.braysofourlives.com/

    The blanketing suggestions are in yesterday's post.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug. 22, 2005
    Location
    mid-atlantic
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    2,515

    Default

    I'm usually a blanket-er, but I didn't blanket my horse at all the entire winter he was on stall rest, in a colder climate than that. He was fine and never got cold.
    "You become responsible, forever, for what you have tamed." - The Little Prince



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul. 24, 2004
    Posts
    2,909

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by EverAfter View Post
    Is it bad not to blanket a horse with a mammoth coat that is stalled at night with lows in the 40s and daytime highs in the 70's?
    Absolutely not! In fact I'd be worried they would get too hot w/ a blanket on at night and being that fuzzy. If you are worried about the horse being cold then free-choice hay is the way to go - fuels the furnace.
    "When a horse greets you with a nicker & regards you with a large & liquid eye, the question of where you want to be & what you want to do has been answered." CANTER New England



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Dec. 13, 1999
    Location
    Greensboro, NC
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    36,940

    Default

    Have to agree - DW said it best, that's room temp for horses!

    At 70 they're even working to stay a bit cool. 40* nights are breathing freely weather for horses.

    A healthy horse with a good coat and plenty of hay, as long as he can get out of the high winds or skin-soaking rains, is perfectly capable of temperatures below 0*F.
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Dec. 21, 2007
    Location
    Georgia
    Posts
    45

    Default

    If the horse in question were old, underweight or having some sort of pain or health issue that made him/her a "not easy" keeper. I would consider blanketing at night just to help maintain the calories consumed. They shiver their muscles to stay warm. They eat hay to have fuel to shiver their muscles. Save on the hay consumption and save the fuel, put on a blanket at night.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    May. 3, 2006
    Posts
    11,568

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    No it's not bad.

    Indeed I'm struggling to imagine why anyone would want to blanket a stalled horse.... especially with those "heady" high temperatures!



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Feb. 22, 2007
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    3,928

    Default

    I certainly would not blanket a horse in those conditions, either. Even my elderly thin-coated hard-keeping Thoroughbreds are very comfortable at 40 degrees. Especially if your horse has a thick winter coat, he is probably already a bit warm at those temperatures.

    People often want to throw blankets on their horses whenever they (the people) feel cold, but it's important to remember that they're cold weather animals, and usually when you're feeling comfortable or even a bit chilly they're pretty warm.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Nov. 13, 2009
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    Default

    No way. Don't blanket that horse.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Oct. 18, 2000
    Location
    Connecticut
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    8,200

    Default

    Haven't blanketed in years. My wooly mammoths do just fine, even in very cold weather. I add more hay and warm up the water.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jun. 26, 2000
    Location
    I live in Chantilly, VA but I ride in Anytown, USA
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    Default

    I have an OTTB and I'm usually one to blanket but I'm also usually one to bodyclip. But I might not do either this year.

    Our days are currently getting up to the 50's and next week I hear it is going to be in the 70s here and there. At night, it has gotten down into the 30's. Since my horse is in during the night, I'm not going to blanket.

    My BO knows that if she's got to get the guys out during the day if it is drizzly to throw his med turn out on but I think we're going naked this year. I might blanket if it gets into the 20's during the day. But we'll see. If I stick my hand in his coat and I feel a nice little fire burning, I'll be leaving him alone. He's growing a nice, dense coat right now.

    "If you have the time, spend it. If you have a hand, lend it. If you have the money, give it. If you have a heart, share it." by me



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Oct. 24, 2000
    Location
    Lake Norman, NC USA
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    648

    Default

    I put rain sheets on for cool, rainy day turnout, otherwise nothing.



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jul. 19, 2003
    Location
    Middleburg, VA
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    13,717

    Default

    Under those conditions, it would be silly TO blanket.

    However, I will admit to throwing some sheets on some fuzzballs this past week at night (normally, I would almost never blanket an unclipped horse, inside or out), but our circumstances were different. We have additions going on both ends of the barn and BOTH ends are open on top right now, so all the heat in the barn can go right out. Our lows were getting down around freezing, and since the horses are in at night, I was worried that my fuzzies weren't moving enough to keep their body heat up (they both a little on the scrawny side, too). They were also the two closest stalls to one end of the barn, and the cold draft was blowing RIGHT on them. So, they got a little layer for the nights (then one subsequently got clipped, so is now blanketed no matter what).

    Our barn is a freaking ice box right now...can not WAIT for the construction to be over and done with!



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Nov. 20, 2005
    Location
    missoula. mt
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    Default

    I'm surprised someone would even ask that question. We don't blanket and it gets down well below zero here. IMO it would be cruel to blanket a horse in those temps. ESPECIALLY if the horse has his winter coat.



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