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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan. 17, 2008
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    Default Club foot or...

    Horse I saw, liked etc...

    slightly knock kneed. As in, did not paddle or move funny, did not travel closely etc. I believe it is in part to a bad trim job. The owner confirmed that the last trim was done strangely...low on the inside heel.

    Educate me about knees please! See link for photo.

    http://picasaweb.google.com/10311849...24589779886050



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct. 31, 2009
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    USEA-Area 3/USHJA-Zone 4/USDF-Region 3
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    385

    Default

    I think that is called splay-footed or splay-legged. Horse probably puts more weight on the inside of the leg/hoof than the outside.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan. 31, 2003
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    18,472

    Default

    In theory... Young horses toe out and as the chest widens the leg rotates in. In theory. So take that FWIW.

    Otherwise this horse toes out, which is a deal breaker for me. YMMV.
    "Kindness is free" ~ Eurofoal
    ---
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul. 19, 2007
    Location
    Michigan
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    Default

    She looks slightly splayed, but she's also standing on uneven ground. If the trim looked low on the inside heel (why did he do that?) it might just be that.

    I would be more concerned if she were MASSIVELY splay-legged (Lucky turns out in back almost as badly as *I* do and he does have some issues with crossing over and not having the prettiest canter in the world in back) but if she does have a funny trim that could be grown out/corrected and she doesn't move badly, it's not something *I* would personally worry about.



  5. #5
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    Jan. 17, 2008
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    Default

    What is YMMV?

    Horse is 5.



  6. #6
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    Default

    Thanks Dancer. Its very slight, I took 2 pictures and she is not straight from the shoulder to hoof...but I didn't look at her and think OHMYGODRUN. She is young, 5, pretty tall and big barrelled. She is actually quite a lovely mover, both from watching and riding. She is barefoot right now, has been for a few months. THe owner did say she noticed the trim was weird...the RF looked a bit clubby to me, again, not a deal breaker as I have a great farrier who works magic...but he'd know how to trim her just right. I know you shouldn't go changing angles and what not with horses that are matured.



  7. #7
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    Jul. 19, 2007
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    Michigan
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    Default

    I don't see any club-footedness from that angle, anyway. I'd be mostly concerned with how she moved.



  8. #8
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    Jan. 31, 2003
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    Default

    Your mileage may vary.

    I trim quite a few aged (late teen) horses who turn out. It's not a fun conformation fault to deal with as they age. Ringbone seems to be the biggest problem followed by collateral ligament issues. If this is a long term keeper horse for you, it is something to think about. Of course you may be lucky (I am not) and never have a problem with it. At five I think it will not change tho and since the feet match I'd be concerned she was trimmed to look straight as a baby and this is the end result. No way to know for sure tho!
    "Kindness is free" ~ Eurofoal
    ---
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar. 10, 2006
    Location
    Albany NY
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    5,521

    Default

    One can't see club foot from the angle of that one picture.

    You should take pictures standing on cement or pavement, from each side at hoof level, front, and back.
    Airborne? Oh. Yes, he can take a joke. Once. After that, the joke's on you.



  10. #10
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    Mar. 10, 2006
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    Albany NY
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    Default

    Those kinds of pics will also help to characterize any lateral imbalances in the trim.
    Airborne? Oh. Yes, he can take a joke. Once. After that, the joke's on you.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan. 17, 2008
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    2,037

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by EqTrainer View Post
    Your mileage may vary.

    I trim quite a few aged (late teen) horses who turn out. It's not a fun conformation fault to deal with as they age. Ringbone seems to be the biggest problem followed by collateral ligament issues. If this is a long term keeper horse for you, it is something to think about. Of course you may be lucky (I am not) and never have a problem with it. At five I think it will not change tho and since the feet match I'd be concerned she was trimmed to look straight as a baby and this is the end result. No way to know for sure tho!
    The horse is fancy enough for me to train & show for a few years and put mileage on. she'd be quite a lovely low level junior horse. She's incredibly quiet and sane.

    I realize that when I am ready to move up in level, the horse I use for lower levels is probably NOT going to be the one. This one "does it" for me. Jump her 3 feet? Probably not. But 2'6 yes.



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