The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Results 1 to 14 of 14
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun. 28, 2010
    Posts
    17

    Default Concrete ramps going into stalls

    My trainer is moving to a new facility. The aisleways in the barn are brick/concrete, the stall floors are dirt. There is a half gate door on each stall, presumably so they can put their heads over and look out. There is a step down into each stall; the entrance into the stall is a concrete ramp about 2 feet deep at about a 30% angle. Think of a handicap ramp and you'll get the general idea. The ramp goes down into each stall so the horses will have to walk on it to get in or out of the stall. I'm also not sure how they are supposed to be able to look over the gate as they'd have to actually stand on the ramp to do so.

    Has anyone seen a set up like this and if so, what did you think of it? I'm concerned about the horses slipping, and not sure even if it would be good for them to stand on that slant to try to look out.

    My mare is just finally starting walking under saddle after a long layup for a torn ligament, so she is in the stall all the time except for her 45 minute daily walk. Granted, I am a little paranoid about her getting hurt.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    43,045

    Default

    I have seen all kinds of goofy barn layouts, but that one, as you describe it, may be the goofiest yet.

    At least I would add compacting material to the stalls, so they are up to the aisle height, mat and bed well.

    That concrete ramp sounds like an accident waiting to happen.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    May. 2, 2002
    Posts
    1,312

    Thumbs down First thought..Where's The Fruitbat

    This is a very scary, very dangerous situation. Concrete "sweats" in humidity and becomes uber slippery. I also worry about a horse wounding itself on the "sharp" edges!

    I am in complete agreement with Bluey. This is an accident waiting to happen!!!!

    I would not allow one of my horses in a stall like the one described. I do not mean to start an argument and I am jumping into a double thick flame suit, but these would be my choices:

    #1 Demand the stall be filled with enough compacted stonedust that the stall floor is level with the concrete thing & then cover with mats.

    #2 Board at a place with normal stalls and ship in to trainer for lessons...I realize you need a trailer for this.

    #3 Move to a new trainer...this is probably easier said than done.

    I know my 3 solutions sound harsh, but I just worry this stall configuration is putting the OP's horse in danger.
    Beth



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb. 6, 2003
    Location
    Deep South
    Posts
    14,931

    Default

    DANGEROUS !!

    Is it possible to knock a door through the back of the stalls ?
    ... _. ._ .._. .._



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep. 7, 2009
    Location
    Lexington, KY
    Posts
    20,088

    Default

    I agree with Invite. Trainer should level stalls or remove ramp. Our stalls have a lip/curb but gate sits flush to it. It helps keep the bedding in. But, the horses don't have to walk on it, they step over it.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul. 15, 2003
    Location
    Tampa, FL
    Posts
    4,343

    Default

    Having had barns with dirt floors, I have constantly had to plop down concrete pavers in stall doorways to prevent horses from pawing holes in the floor by their doors. I always tried to angle them so I didn't have concrete edges sticking up where horses would possibly be able to lay on it or step on a corner and make the concrete paver move out of place.

    I am guessing that the concrete ramps are to prevent holes from being dug by hooves, and the slope is to prevent a concrete "edge" from jutting out into the stall.

    Just keep the stall bedded so the horses step on the bedding instead of the concrete.
    Every man has a right to his opinion, but no man has a right to be wrong in his facts.
    Bernard M. Baruch



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug. 31, 2004
    Location
    VA
    Posts
    4,345

    Default

    Could it have been designed for someone who uses deep litter or some similarly deep bedding system, such that it would be more or less level once bedding were added?
    -Grace



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    43,045

    Default

    With dirt stalls, we added pieces of rubber belting to the doors on the inside, so horses standing there looking out would not dig a hole moving around.
    We didn't have rubber mats in those days of old.

    I assumed by the description that this was a large, about 4' by 2' or more considerably angled concrete chunk by the doors and that seems a little bit overkill for concrete, may as well have the whole stall be concrete and no angle at the door.

    Then, maybe that was just a discrete concrete pad, but I still wonder about the angled part, if it is that noticeable.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov. 9, 2005
    Location
    uk
    Posts
    15,278

    Default

    1st thing that comes to my mind as if she has planning permisson for her stalls
    often people use dirt stalls i have them with a step of concrete outside the door as mine go straight onto the fields and its to stop the rianwater comming in as they are slightly down hill from the field

    but mine are ordance buildings which are on the ordance survey map in other words have permission for the sheds as i call them
    but if i put a concrete floor in them then i have to get planning permission to use them as stables as then they quoted as buildings

    at the moement they are and can be moved in other words can come down and be removed

    a concrete floor based building has to have planning permission here in uk

    so am thinking you have same or simular laws



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct. 28, 2007
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    4,517

    Default

    Could this have been a dairy farm previously? The barn I am at has a large concrete ramp leading up to the (normal) stalls. Most of the barnyard has concrete or slippery stone cobbles. It used to be a dairy farm.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun. 28, 2010
    Posts
    17

    Default

    Have tried to figure out the intended usage.. drainage wouldn't appear to be the answer as any water would drain into the stall. Possible it was put to prevent digging, but rubber mats would have made more sense to me.

    Not sure if it could have been a cow barn.The property was originally used for ropers so there were cows. The stalls themselves are large, 16x20.

    Bluey is correct, it is about 4 feet wide by 2 feet deep going down into the stall at about a 30% angle. Also, since the concrete just goes across the doorway, there is a drop off on either side of at least a few inches.

    I did express my concerns to the trainer; she said that there has never been a problem with any horse there. Which leads me to believe that she must have questioned it herself. Whether I actually believe that is another thing

    She has said that we can add stone dust to it to bring it more level, or add rubber matting to the top of the ramp ourselves if we want to. Meaning each individual boarder can do that for our own horse, she as manager/trainer won't be providing that.

    I know its not acceptable to me as is.. I'm thinking I also need to look carefully at the rest of the facility... and the suggestions from Invite have crossed my mind..



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Apr. 14, 2006
    Posts
    3,572

    Default

    I've seen ramps outside the stall, but never inside!! Or will that much difference in height from stall to aisle. If the horse wants to look out the stall door - as the screen invites...he will be standing with his front feet on the ramp and hind feet, two feet lower!!! And I assume that if he rolls in the stall there is a danger of hitting the edge of the ramp with a body part!! Sounds like the barn was designed by a person who knew nothing about horses!!! To bring the stall floor up to the aisle level with dirt or stone dust would take a heck of a lot of fill material!!! I would not be tempted to keep my horse at this place!!!
    www.crosscreeksporthorses.com
    Breeders of Painted Thoroughbreds and Uniquely Painted Irish Sport Horses in Northeast Oklahoma



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Mar. 10, 2006
    Location
    Albany NY
    Posts
    5,521

    Default

    It may well have been a dairy barn - MistyBlue might be able to say - I have seen dairy barns where there is a concrete aisle, with trenches on either side, in which stand the cows. I have seen old barns which are empty except for a center aisle with trenches on either side which I assumed was for dairy. Stanchions were gone, but I figured it was, and have contemplated how to refit such a building to horses.

    I have two granite foundations on my property which were supposedly barns. They are three sided, and one end is open, and there is a cement floor in the middle extending beyond the open end. There is 12 feet of trench, so to speak, on either side of the cement pad in the middle, so 12 feet from edge of cement pad to stone wall, which could be stalls, if I wanted to build on these. The trench is about 2 feet below the level of the cement center aisle/pad. Seen several old bank barns with quite a step down into the stall area. I have thought they might have had a wooden floor built up, which was gone, or else cows were in them.

    Don't know why cows would be lower than the center aisle in a barn, but something makes me think sometimes they were.

    Someone put the ramps in, dunno when or why. Wierd.

    I would only put my horse there having built up the floor with stone dust and matted it, so that after the stall was bedded it was level with the center aisle. If some of the hroses will be down in the "pit" and some standing at aisle level, it will look funny walking along seeing a "tall" horse, "short" horse, tall, tall, short, short, etc.

    I would only use th
    Airborne? Oh. Yes, he can take a joke. Once. After that, the joke's on you.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Mar. 10, 2006
    Location
    Albany NY
    Posts
    5,521

    Default

    I wonder if the stalls originally had plank floors at aisle level, and the wood floors were taken out. If I recall, an old barn where I bought my first horse from was paved with brick aisle, had wide plank floors in the stalls, which were loose, so they could be removed, and the floor under them washed down. With all the boards up in all the stalls, the floor underneath (asphalt, or something, I beleive) could be hosed from one end to the other, then the boards replaced in the stalls. The barn was originally constructed in the 1700's and was originally a hunt club, so it was fancy pantsy, chestnut planks in the stalls, brick aisles, wrought iron and oak stalls, brass hardware and a section of straight stalls for carriage horses around a large indoor place where carriages could be pulled in and worked on like a garage. The stalls were 14 x 14 and the entire place was paneled in chestnut.
    Airborne? Oh. Yes, he can take a joke. Once. After that, the joke's on you.



Similar Threads

  1. Cleats on trailer ramps
    By Whistlejacket in forum Around The Farm
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: Feb. 22, 2012, 11:27 PM
  2. Adding stalls to concrete floored shop?
    By Melelio in forum Around The Farm
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: Jul. 25, 2011, 09:56 AM
  3. Concrete ridge in stalls
    By Corbyville283 in forum Horse Care
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: Jun. 21, 2010, 02:55 PM
  4. Replies: 13
    Last Post: May. 9, 2010, 11:29 PM
  5. Concrete or stone dust under barn/stalls?
    By dmalbone in forum Around The Farm
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: Sep. 2, 2009, 05:46 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •