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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov. 8, 2006
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    2,384

    Default Seller: "horse has ring worm and can't leave the farm for another 2 weeks"

    Is this reasonable or just a big red flag? This horse is 3, expensive and I just bought my plane ticket and hotel to see him in 2 days and they tell me tonight he can't leave the farm where there is no arena. This morning (before buying ticket) we had planned to take him to a facility with a jumping lane and an enclosed area to see him move out. I am overreacting to the ringworm quarantine? I would never buy a horse with out taking them on a field trip... now I can't even vet him off the property



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan. 16, 2007
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    2,169

    Default

    Well, my sister got ringworm from an adopted cat, and it spread to her 2 dogs and other cat, and it was 3 months of H.E.L.L. of treatment for her, her husband, and the animals, not to mention boiling all her sheets, throwing out half her clothes, having all her carpets cleaned professionally and bathing in bleach three times a day.

    I think she figured it cost about 15k in the end.

    It's a fungus, highly contagious among humans and animals, expensive to treat and a general PITA.

    But hey, you could get bedbugs in the hotel, too.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan. 30, 2010
    Location
    Alberta
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    3,511

    Default

    Ring worm is considered to be highly contagious, so they may not want the horse in their trailer, and they may not be comfortable asking another barn if the ring worm affected horse can come onto their property as they may not want to advertise that their barn has ring worm.

    I think too that it is wise to limit the stressors of an infected horse to help them heal better.

    So I guess I think they are being reasonible and I hope you bought transferable airline tickets!



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan. 16, 2002
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    West Coast of Michigan
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    Default

    Good lord, it's not the bubonic plague. Yes, it's contagious, but nothing more than a nuisance in most instances. I guess if I had one with it (youngsters are more susceptible, older horses and people develop some degree of immunity over time) I'd want the horse not in close contact with other youngsters and I'd keep the blankets, brushes, etc. separate but I'm not sure I'd lock the critter down in a plastic bubble.
    Click here before you buy.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb. 17, 2010
    Location
    Purcellville, VA
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    1,224

    Default

    Really, affected horses should be isolated to prevent spreading ringworm to other horses and people. This is a zoonotic disease that can be easily spread to people in contact with the horse or items the horse has contaminated.

    Delta, your right it's not the bubonic plague, but I think the sellers are just trying to be cautious. Since it CAN spread to other horses, AND people fairly easily..



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug. 17, 2004
    Location
    Rixeyville, VA
    Posts
    6,466

    Default

    If I were the seller and I had an out of state buyer coming in to see a horse, I would offer to pay the airline fee to reschedule the ticket. As a seller, I know that anyone who is willing to travel a considerable distance is a serious buyer. I would rather pay the fee and have the buyer come back when the horse can be shown as agreed. It's the cost of doing business IMO.
    Where Norwegian Fjords Rule
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  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar. 24, 2007
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    1,804

    Default

    I adopted a PMU baby that ended up with ring due to the condition he came in......none of my healthy horses got it and he was in the same barn and sharing a fence line.

    My vet said that healthy horses don't usually get ring worm....so I would be more concerned about his physical condition than about spreading it.

    Dalemma



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug. 26, 2010
    Location
    in the woodwork....
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    1,650

    Default

    If I were boarded anywhere near you and you brought your horse with ringworm into the barn, I would be really upset.

    At one barn that I was at, a boarder who's horse went to a lot of shows and clinics came back with ringworm. All the horses around that gelding had to be treated to also be treated. Not fun!
    Last edited by BetterOffRed; Oct. 13, 2010 at 02:33 PM.
    "I'm holding out for the $100,000 Crossrail Classic in 2012." --mem
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  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar. 24, 2007
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    1,804

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BetterOffRed View Post
    If I were boarded anywhere near you and you brought your horse with ringworm into the barn, I would be really upset.

    At one barn that I was at, a boarder that went to a lot of shows and clinics came back with ringworm. All the horses around him in the barn had to be treated to also be treated. Not fun!
    This was my barn so only my horses at risk.......I would never bring a horse into some one elses barn with out disclosing and with out taking extra precautions such as having the horse as isolated from the other horses as possible plus adopting proper hygeine protocols.........my point was that with proper precautions it does not have to spread through an entire barn.

    Dalemma

    PS It was an electric fence so no chance of touching.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    May. 17, 2003
    Posts
    5,561

    Default

    I got ringworm from an auction horse two weeks before my wedding... A bit of a pain, but no, not the bubonic plague.

    And a perfectly healthy horse I owned got it from a borrowed girth, so it doesn't mean the horse in question is in poor shape. We were very careful she didn't pass it around any further, though. And I can understand the seller being cautious from that point of view. They probably don't want to damage relationships locally by taking a potentially infectious horse onto someone else's property.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Sep. 13, 2002
    Location
    Pacific Northwest
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    Default

    If it really is just a case of ringworm and they are being cautious about spreading it, I don't have a problem with this. Couldn't you just reschedule for after the quarantine? Now, I'm suspicious by nature and esp when it comes to horse selling, so I'd also be thinking, hmmm...is he lame or something and they don't want to tell me? But if they are willing to let you come look, just not take him off the property, I guess that isn't the case.

    Ringworm is a pain to deal with and young horses do seem to be more susceptible. My now-5 yr old got it just before a show when he was 3 -- I could have taken him to the show as it was in a place that wasn't too evident, but didn't want to risk exposure to others (including the handler) so I scratched. Kept him isolated at the barn and scrubbed everything he was exposed. Two weeks does seem to be the usual time frame.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Dec. 15, 2005
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    3,270

    Default

    If your tickets are nonrefundable, I would go and see the horse. Even if you can only ride him in his turnout area, you will get a good idea of whether or not you are interested in him. If you like him, you can come back in a few weeks. If the real story is that he is lame, the seller may be forced to tell you the truth.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    May. 7, 2004
    Location
    Linden, CA
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    844

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by deltawave View Post
    Good lord, it's not the bubonic plague. Yes, it's contagious, but nothing more than a nuisance in most instances.
    Quote Originally Posted by sar2008 View Post
    Really, affected horses should be isolated to prevent spreading ringworm to other horses and people. This is a zoonotic disease that can be easily spread to people in contact with the horse or items the horse has contaminated.
    In horses it may be just a nuisance, but in other species (I'm thinking cats) it can become endemic and really difficult to eradicate in a home situation (as MelantheLLC describes). I'm with sar on this one; yes, it's not life-threatening, but it's better not to spread it around.
    Quote Originally Posted by HuntrJumpr
    No matter what level of showing you're doing, you are required to have pants on.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Sep. 13, 2002
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    Azle, Teh-has
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    Default

    good choice by them.

    ring worm sucks. I'm fighting it right now.

    though I have no issues letting MY pets mingle I would not take my nappy fungus pores to someone else's play pen. : )

    I figured out my cat came with ring worm when I ended up covered in it. Only 1 month of anti fungals for me but I've been treating my cat for 4-5 months.

    15K worth of precautions is a bit dramatic but it is a royal PITA.
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  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jan. 25, 2000
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    Ohio
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AKB View Post
    If your tickets are nonrefundable, I would go and see the horse. Even if you can only ride him in his turnout area, you will get a good idea of whether or not you are interested in him. If you like him, you can come back in a few weeks. If the real story is that he is lame, the seller may be forced to tell you the truth.
    I agree w/ the above.

    I give them credit that they are doing the right thing by keeping the horse at home and telling prospective buyers before they come out.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jun. 15, 2002
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    5,926

    Default

    Wow. I had ringworm for a month and none of the horses I handles daily or my cats or SO or anyone else caught it. I just kept creme on it and sprayed it constantly!

    Lotrim ultra works great. The creme and the spray!



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Aug. 12, 2009
    Posts
    1,805

    Default

    When I first got my TB she came with a spot that looked like a blanket rub, vet said put lotrimin on it, went away in a less than two weeks. (this was over two years ago) I didn't get it, my dog didn't no other horses did, etc.

    About two weeks ago got a weird spot on my arm, fungus light at doctor was positive, said lotrimin. Did not spready anywhere else. My hubby thinks he had it first, he has one little spot. Nearly gone after several days of lotrimin. I can't imagine how you spend $15,000 on it? I guess its more aggressive in some people, animals? (didn't know such an issue for cats)

    Can't blame them for being cautious though.



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Jan. 16, 2007
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    Default

    Well, the 15k was probably an exaggeration. But not entirely in my sister's case. Her dogs got it from the new cat, and lost all the hair around their muzzles. She has 3 cats, two older, and in the end trying to get them all medicated was so stressful that she sent all the animals to the vet for however many weeks it took for the treatment until they tested clear. The drugs were relatively expensive and the board was astronomical for that long. The lotramin was used at first, but they weren't testing clear so they ended up using some sort of pill that cost a fair amount and took a long time. I think it had to be given over the life cycle of the fungus. So that was a big part of the expense. She did have to have every floor in the house cleaned professionally.

    She took it very very hard, though. It's like lice, there's a psychological component to it, where you feel like if you touch anyone or go anywhere you are spreading it. Maybe she got that feeling off the vets, I dunno, but they took it very seriously.

    So yeah, I wouldn't blame the barn for quarantining the horse. I think it was straight of them to actually tell you about it.

    It's not bubonic plague, but neither are bedbugs, and nobody wants them either.



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Aug. 12, 2009
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    Default

    ewww now bedbugs gross me out sounds like cats really get it bad! good to know! glad I don't have one or I would be super cautious and concerned



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jan. 16, 2002
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    West Coast of Michigan
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    Default

    It's like lice, there's a psychological component to it, where you feel like if you touch anyone or go anywhere you are spreading it.
    Maybe for some, but that's not a normal sort of reaction.
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