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  1. #1
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    Default New EVA Restrictions

    Utah recently joined Montana, Washington and Idaho in implementing restrictions with regards to the entry of EVA positive stallions or EVA positive semen. Montana is the most restrictive of all states and does not allow the entry of ANY EVA positive stallion or semen. Veterinarians in that state can lose their license if they do not follow the restrictions/requirements of the state, so they're pretty serious about it in Montana. The other states are considerably more reasonable and realistic, but if you're a mare or stallion owner, be aware that if you are shipping semen into any of these states, there "are" requirements that must be in place prior to shipping. Hope the following information helps!

    New update on our news page - Equine-Reproduction.com News

    Utah (USA) Implements New EVA Regulations

    The State of Utah has initiated a new set of regulations pertaining to Equine Viral Arteritis and possible positive (shedding) stallions and infective semen. As of September 1st 2010, any stallion entering the State for breeding purposes must be tested within the 30 days prior to entry for Equine Arteritis Virus (EAV) presence. Stallions that test positive are only admitted upon issuance of a permit by the Utah Department of Agriculture and must immediately upon entry travel to and be located at a facility approved for the housing of EAV-positive stallions (an "approved facility"). They may only be subsequently moved to a different approved facility within the State upon receiving permission from the State Veterinarian.

    There are no restrictions or regulations at this time involving stallions that test negative on the pre-entry testing. Stallions that have proof of a negative EAV-antibody presence test prior to initial vaccination, along with proof of annual boosters, are exempt from the pre-entry testing requirements. This regulation applies to any "equine" or "equid" - they being defined as any animal in the family Equidae, including, but not limited to horses, *****, mules, ponies, and zebras

    Equine semen from EAV-positive ("shedding") stallions shipped into Utah must be accompanied by a shipped semen permit, applications for which can be obtained from the Utah Department of Agriculture. This semen must also be shipped solely and directly to an approved facility and remain there until inseminated or disposed of, or until it is shipped to another in-State approved facility. "Approved facilities" have been issued a permit as having met the following requirements as required by the Utah Department of Agriculture:

    * All equids, including but not limited to stallions, mares and geldings, on approved facilities shall be vaccinated for EVA no less than 21 days before the start of breeding season or no less than 21 days before arriving at an approved facility. * Mares being bred to a carrier stallion, or inseminated with semen from a carrier stallion, shall remain on the approved facility for a minimum of 21 days after the initial breeding date. * Adequate biosecurity precautions shall be in place during the breeding season. The adequacy of biosecurity may be monitored periodically by the Utah Department of Agriculture.

    Applications for approval of a facility for housing of positive stallions or
    semen from them can be obtained from the Utah Department of Agriculture web site at this location:
    http://ag.utah.gov/divisions/animal/...questF\orm.pdf Import permits may be obtained by calling the Utah Department of Agriculture at (801) 538-7164 during business hours (Monday-Thursday 7 AM - 6 PM, Mountain Time), or after hours and weekends by calling one of the current telephone numbers listed on-line at: http://ag.utah.gov/divisions/animal/health/index.html.

    Horses upon entry into Utah (as is common in most States) may be subject to physical inspection and approval of associated paperwork at the Port of Entry or way-stations. In addition to the routinely-required Certificate of Veterinary Inspection (Health Certificate), negative EIA (Coggin's) test (taken within 12 months of time of entry) and proof of ownership or brand inspection certificate, stallions should now be accompanied by proof of negative EVA status or vaccination with annual boosters, or if a positive "shedding" stallion, a copy of the permit obtained from the Utah Department of Agriculture.

    The entire Administrative Code - entitled "Rule R58-23. Equine Viral Arteritis
    (EVA)" - can be viewed on the Utah government website at this location:
    http://www.rules.utah.gov/publicat/c...8/r058-023.htm
    __________________
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  2. #2
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    Kathy, Thanks for the up date.
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  3. #3
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    Thanks Kathy! Always good to be informed!
    Quote Originally Posted by The Centaurian View Post
    As far as I am concerned, leadline is a legitimate reason to have children.



  4. #4

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    Can semen be shipped to these states from stallions that have not been tested?



  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by 092556 View Post
    Can semen be shipped to these states from stallions that have not been tested?
    No. Which is the reason for the heads up. Washington, Idaho and Utah will allow EVA positive semen into the state, but everyone has to be aware of it and import permits signed, sealed and delivered in advance. Easy enough to do if you're aware of it prior to breeding season, but trying to get a test done and the results back on short notice just isn't going to happen. Montana, the most restrictive of them all (will not allow EVA positive semen or an EVA positive stallion entry) was actually very easy to work with and I could fax the test results over to them and they would fax back the permit the same day. But, I wouldn't rely on that kind of turn around. Planning ahead makes thinks sooo much less stressful - especially in the height of breeding season !
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  6. #6
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    Kathy, do these new regulations strike you as rather neanderthal? I mean, I have mares that are protected against EVA. If I want to breed them to Florencio, why on earth should the state prevent that?



  7. #7

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    Does the "state" really check entry of each shipping container? If I ship semen from California to Georgia via FedEx, are you saying there's a state vet/?"hired checker"? checking each shipment? How would they ever know?



  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Home Again Farm View Post
    Kathy, do these new regulations strike you as rather neanderthal? I mean, I have mares that are protected against EVA. If I want to breed them to Florencio, why on earth should the state prevent that?
    Definitely not at all. You are an informed breeder that understands the risks and ramifications. Unfortunately, many (most?) breeders have absolutely no clue or understanding of the disease. And, it's not just about warmbloods. With the outbreak in 2006 within the quarter Horse industry, it has done much to bring the disease out of the closet, but there is still a plethora of misinformation about it out there and a huge amount of misunderstanding. Simply trying to keep track of what is coming in and going out is a reasonable expectation and realistic management. Some breeders are rather cavalier about the disease and that's where problems will arise. So, I do see the regulations as a means of insuring that everyone is educated and understands the risks and protocols are in place to mitigate any problems or risks. Truly, it is scary how many people don't understand or even know about the disease at all!

    The new restrictions for Utah are realistic and not particularly restrictive. They just want to insure that the disease is kept under control and managed and handled properly. The only state that would restrict you from breeding to Florencio (to my knowledge), is Montana. All the other states just want to be sure that everyone is on the same page. In talking with the state vet in Utah, he was extremely realistic on his expectations and what their goal is.

    Does the "state" really check entry of each shipping container? If I ship semen from California to Georgia via FedEx, are you saying there's a state vet/?"hired checker"? checking each shipment? How would they ever know?
    Currently the only states that require a permit - that we are aware of at this time - re Washington, Idaho, Montana and Utah. If you are shipping semen into any of those states, you are obligated to make sure that you have all the paperwork in place. If you're shipping from Georgia to California, neither state has any requirements in place at this time that I'm aware of.

    You are correct, they may never know, but the onus is put on the veterinarian in most of the states. In Montana, if a veterinarian accepts semen without the proper permits in place runs the risk of losing his license! Not a risk that most vets would be willing to take, so that's how they are enforcing the shipping in. But truthfully, why would you want to try to avoid the process? The test, if the stallion isn't vaccinated, should be run every year anyway! And, the permit is free - just simply complete the application and fax it back to most of the states. The premise behind the import permit is to attempt to eradicate the disease and to be absolutely sure that everyone is aware of teh status of an EVA positive stallion in order to make sure the proper protocols are followed. That's very realistic, I think. And, they're not attempting to restrict the breeding of or with an EVA positive stallion (well...with the exception of Montana, but we do think their restrictions and regulations are unrealistic).

    Hope that helps!
    Last edited by Equine Reproduction; Oct. 9, 2010 at 12:52 AM.
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  9. #9
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    Thanks for explaining, Kathy. As always you are a wealth of knowledge.



  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Home Again Farm View Post
    Thanks for explaining, Kathy. As always you are a wealth of knowledge.
    <smile>..nah...just tired and cranky <lol>. But glad it helps. I know for someone like you, it's a no brainer. But, holy smokes...there are just so many breeders who don't understand about the disease.
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  11. #11

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    . But truthfully, why would you want to try to avoid the process?
    nobody said anything about wanting to avoid the process. With my recent foreign importation 101 learning experience where a USDA vet has to be called to inspect each shipment of biologicals, I was envisioning the same due dilligence and wondering how many people / time \ coordination it was going to take for a state to state shipment. If it's nothing more than a free permit the local vet has to sign off on then it's really no biggie. Just extra restrictions on something none of us horse owners want an outbreak of. Probably a good thing. Unless you're in that state wanting to breed to florencio or contango, etc...



  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Home Again Farm View Post
    Thanks for explaining, Kathy. As always you are a wealth of knowledge.
    <smile>..nah...just tired and cranky <lol>. But glad it helps. I know for someone like you, it's a no brainer. But, holy smokes...there are just so many breeders who don't understand about the disease.
    Equine-Reproduction.com Now offering one on one customized training!
    Leg-Up Equestrian Assistance Program, Inc. A 501(c)(3) non-profit charity



  13. #13
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    For my education what are the risks of breeding to a EVA positive stallion? Risks alone without mares being vaccinated and the risks if the mare is vaccinated (if there are any)? I am not currently interested in breeding but am interested in always learning. Thanks
    Diane



  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by back in the saddle View Post
    If it's nothing more than a free permit the local vet has to sign off on then it's really no biggie. Just extra restrictions on something none of us horse owners want an outbreak of. Probably a good thing. Unless you're in that state wanting to breed to florencio or contango, etc...
    It's even easier than that. Once you get the copy of the EVA lab report, you simply complete the import permit application, attach the lab report and forward it to the appropriate department. No need for the vet other than the initial EVA test ! How simple is that?
    Equine-Reproduction.com Now offering one on one customized training!
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  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by PonyLady29 View Post
    For my education what are the risks of breeding to a EVA positive stallion? Risks alone without mares being vaccinated and the risks if the mare is vaccinated (if there are any)? I am not currently interested in breeding but am interested in always learning. Thanks
    Diane
    Go here for all the information:

    http://www.equine-reproduction.com/articles/EVA.shtml

    http://www.equine-reproduction.com/a...VA-facts.shtml

    It should answer all your questions. Knowingly breeding an unvaccinated mare to a positive stallion is strongly to be discouraged and is considered irresponsible due to the inherent risk of exposing other animals to the disease and thereby possibly creating an abortion storm.

    Hope the above helps!
    Equine-Reproduction.com Now offering one on one customized training!
    Leg-Up Equestrian Assistance Program, Inc. A 501(c)(3) non-profit charity



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