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  1. #1
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    Oct. 6, 2010
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    Exclamation Big Break / Sponsorship?

    I'm new to the chronicle of the horse and I was just asking some advice from all you out there.

    I'm a serious rider and do alot of training my own horses and riding other peoples horses because my family does not have the money to buy me a trained competition horse, and I'm not complaining. But I have such a drive to compete. Equitation is all I ever want to do and I think out of all it's the most expensive horse sport.

    I've been thinking alot about how to get my name out there. I would love maybe some day to get sponsored for my riding to help with the financial problems, but to do that I would need to get my name out there..

    So can anyone give me an idea to get my name out there. I don't have the money or the horse (yet, i have youngster prospects) to go to a big competition, and I don't know that many influential people in the equitation world. So how could I get my name out there? How can I get realised? or discovered? How can I get the chance to prove to people that I do belong with the best?

    I know it's the same question everyone is asking, but all I've ever done, since my first little pony at four, was ride. I don't do anything else. I'm so busy with the horses, I am in high school and i don't even try to have a huge social life. So please any ideas??
    Every horse is ART
    And every rider is an ARTIST



  2. #2
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    Mar. 22, 2005
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  3. #3
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    that sounds interesting? never heard of it.
    Every horse is ART
    And every rider is an ARTIST



  4. #4
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    First of all, are you a junior? You realize that "equitation" classes are virtually non-existant for adults, especially professionals.



  5. #5
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    Aug. 11, 2008
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    Start with a local trainer that has a good reputation and offer your services as a working student. You have to be the first one at the barn in the morning, the last one to leave at night, and you have to be willing to give excellent care to the horses and clients, and ride everyting from the beginner school ponies to the greenies that come in for sale. If you really can ride, there's pleny of adult amatuers who are desperate for some talent to show off the nicer horses that they can now afford to buy, but don't have time to develop.

    But you have to be a good rider, grateful for any opportunity offered to you, hard working, reliable, and savvy enough to make friends with the right people who are willing to help you get as far as you can with the resources they have.

    You start the move up the ladder one horse at a time, and you have to ride every one of them like they're a 6 figure horse.
    Lowly Farm Hand with Delusions of Barn Biddieom.
    Witherun Farm
    http://witherun-farm.blogspot.com/



  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tha Ridge View Post
    First of all, are you a junior? You realize that "equitation" classes are virtually non-existant for adults, especially professionals.
    She said she's in high school.



  7. #7
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    Oct. 25, 2009
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    good advice trevelyan96...i have been wanting/wondering the same thing as xemilyx805

    i have been trying to get my name out there by going to the bigger shows i wanna work towards and having word of mouththere,or i am emailing and talking to the show stables that more likely train rider to that calibar etc.
    im sure there will be lots of advice coming your(and my way)on this topic.



  8. #8
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    even though i am not a junior anymore



  9. #9
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    No offense OP, but you sound like every other junior out there - short on funds and experience, but not on ambition. Everybody works hard. Everybody rides all day. Everybody wants to be the best. The truth is, it's a tough road. Even more so for juniors wanting to do the eq because there's a ticking clock involved. It can be done of course, but it involves hard work and a whole lot of luck. As was already suggested, look into becoming a working student at a more local barn. Earn a reputation as the hardest working junior around. And be grateful for every opportunity because there is always someone out there working just as hard as you but with fewer resources.
    "Are you yawning? You don't ride well enough to yawn. I can yawn, because I ride better than you. Meredith Michael Beerbaum can yawn. But you? Not so much..."
    -George Morris



  10. #10
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    Aug. 11, 2008
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    Its no different than fulilling the dream of owning your first GP horse. You have to start with the lower level, not so fancy horses and show that you can make them look better! You make yourself indespnsible to a trainer and offer to catch ride anything available at the C shows. You learn to groom like a pro, earn a reputation for being great with other people's horses both on the ground and in the saddle, and eventually, people will start recommending you to their friends and the better horses come.

    There are several ways to make it to the top. The easiest is to be a talented rider who's family can afford the best horses and lessons for them.

    The 2nd easiest is to come from a family of professional riders.

    The hardest is to be the indespensible barn slave who can clean stalls, bandage legs, braid manes and tails, clean tack, and ride anything thats got 4 hooves and a tail and make it look like a packer even if its trying to kill you.
    Lowly Farm Hand with Delusions of Barn Biddieom.
    Witherun Farm
    http://witherun-farm.blogspot.com/



  11. #11
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    Oct. 4, 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trevelyan96 View Post
    The hardest is to be the indespensible barn slave who can clean stalls, bandage legs, braid manes and tails, clean tack, and ride anything thats got 4 hooves and a tail and make it look like a packer even if its trying to kill you.
    I love this! You've got to be a working student and hang in there. Or enjoy what you've got and let time tick on.



  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tha Ridge View Post
    First of all, are you a junior? You realize that "equitation" classes are virtually non-existant for adults, especially professionals.
    yes I am still a junior, I'm a sophmore in high school. But this is one of the reasons that i'm so nervous about not being able to compete, because i'm running out of time and equitation is really what i want to do. I don't know why but I don't get that crazy thrill out of eventing or show jumping and I just like the challange and perfection of equitation. So after I turn 18 my chance for a spot in the equitation world is over.
    Every horse is ART
    And every rider is an ARTIST



  13. #13
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    Feb. 18, 2001
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    Are you already comfortable jumping around a 3'6" course with and without stirrups? Can you do lateral work? Unfortunately, if you're not already performing at that level, then I would say your chances to be an equitation superstar are slim to none. Not being mean, but that's just the truth.



  14. #14
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    You can always do the adult medals later on. The horse world does not end at 18.
    ---
    They're small hearts.



  15. #15
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    Jun. 17, 2001
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    So, do you want to ride or do you just want to do the National Big Eq???

    See, some goals are attainable with enough hard work. Some are out of reach from where you are BUT sometimes taking small steps one at a time can get you alot closer and not leave you frustrated. Using an analogy, you got to go thru the AA/AAA level, divisions and league championships to get to the World Series-you don't just step out there in October.

    I mean, do you have any show mileage at the AA rateds that host the Big Eq? Have you any mileage at the 3'6"? At 15(?) you have very limited time left to learn the 3'6" and get good enough at the 3'6" to earn a ride on somebody else's horse and/or get them to pay the considerable expense of numerous AA shows to get qualified and then ante up for the trip to indoors-you are talking 1k minimum for each AA show and, maybe 5k+ for that trip to indoors depending on your shipping, transportation and lodging needs.

    Yeah, that's blunt. But it's blunt because you CAN put your emotion and energy into bettering yourself as a rider and getting your name better known by starting local and developing your reputation there. As opposed to fretting about what is a basically unrealistic goal. Dreams are good but must be tempered with reality or you get left hurt and frustrated.
    Last edited by findeight; Oct. 7, 2010 at 01:33 PM.
    When opportunity knocks it's wearing overalls and looks like work.

    The horse world. Two people. Three opinions.



  16. #16
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    Apr. 28, 2008
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    Well, maybe your spot to be an equitation superstar may not be likely but equitation is not something you check at the gate when you walk in the hunter or jumper ring. The purpose of equitation is to make you a better rider, and a better rider is an asset in any class. I still work constantly on my equitation though I have not been 18 in a very long time.

    The concept that opportunity shuts the door at 18 is too ridiculous for words. If you really love equitation you can always carry on in college (IHSA is equitation-focused) and beyond (the Ariat Adult Medal is equitation, and many local circuits also have Adult Medals).



  17. #17
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    Hate to be a killjoy, but OP, you're no different than so many young people- you want to be a star (super model, star QB, reality tv star, blah, blah, blah). You want to be a STAR. If you really were after "the challenge," then you would be attracted to the jumper ring for the same reasons. If you were after "the perfection," then you would be attracted to Dressage. And those opportunities are available to you for your entire life.

    At this point, you aren't going to be really attractive to owners wanting good exposure for their made show horses. Equitation is about the rider, not the horse. You aren't going to be really attractive to sponsors unless you have a huge record and will bring attention to whatever they're selling.

    Your "big break" is going to be of your own making. Unless a fairy godmother pops up out of the woodwork for you, you may not be the next Equitation star. My advice to you is to broaden your dreams a little.



  18. #18
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    Jun. 7, 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jsalem View Post
    Hate to be a killjoy, but OP, you're no different than so many young people- you want to be a star (super model, star QB, reality tv star, blah, blah, blah). You want to be a STAR. If you really were after "the challenge," then you would be attracted to the jumper ring for the same reasons. If you were after "the perfection," then you would be attracted to Dressage. And those opportunities are available to you for your entire life.
    I kind of agree with this.
    If you just want to be a STAR, sure, life ends at 18.

    If you want to have a lifelong relationship with horses and learn how to ride the hair off of them and develop your own string of six figure horses fron babydom onwards with your own hard work...
    well, then life starts at 18.



  19. #19
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    Feb. 4, 2010
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    I agree with most people here saying that these oppurtunities are not just handed out on a silver platter to those less fortunate, they require hard work and dedication to the sport, and PROVING yourself. You litterally have to be willing to give up your life to find an oppurtunity like this.

    My best friend was fortunate enough to get an oppurtunity like this, but it did not come easy. She worked her butt off on green horses, riding whatever came her way, doing boarder-line slave labour in the barn, braiding etc. Her parents were very supportive of her to the best of their ability, paying for leases on mediocre horses who would show her the ropes, paying for a limited number of shows etc. She made most of her name on the green horse she bought who turned into a high jr/am horse who was on his way to becoming a grand prix prospect, however injuries de-railed that. So she went back to leasing. While leasing one of these "mediocre" horses she was approached by an owner with several horses that simply needed a rider. She is now in second year university and her time is spent between the barn and studying, her social life is non-existent. I only see her at the shows and that is when she is running around getting all the horses organized and ready to show or she is back at the stalls on a tack box studying. She has been approached by several people to ride their horses in classes now and has had to turn some people down because of scheduling conflicts and that she simply does not have the time to ride so many horses.

    What I am trying to say is that you really need to prove yourself to people. These catch rides are handed to people who are showing every weekend at the shows because the owners/coaches etc. see their abilities. And those are the riders who proved themselves. My friend worked her butt off, however she never was too "poor" to afford to show, she just was never able to afford the big name horses, or do the big name shows on a weekly basis. She proved her self in the ring, when judges would come up to her and compliment her riding, coaches would comment on the improvement of horses from show to show.

    And as a rider looking for these opportunities you have to be well versed in the discipline before you offer up your abilities. What I mean by that is you cannot be a 2'6 hunter rider who is claiming they will be successful in the big eq ring at 3'6-3'9... You need some sort of miles, or you need to be willing to work through all the intermediate steps to get there. My friend above had shown in almost every class, so setting foot in the High Jr/Am ring was not a new feat for her, and the owners were not paying to see if the rider was capable at that height.

    So I am sorry but unless you can find a way to prove to these big name trainers who you are, finding an opportunity like that will be very hard. Look at ZaZou she won the scholarship to go become a working student. So call the BNTs, see if they need a working student, but be prepared to work your butt off. Everything comes second, including education, is that something you are willing to risk?

    AND MOST IMPORTANTLY

    Be grateful for any opportunity you get, no matter what the quality of horse you ride. Appreciate every moment, because there is a line up of other girls with dreams right behind you waiting to snatch up an opportunity like that. So if you have a bad ride on a horse or a disagreement with an owner do not come post it on here, "venting" and "bashing" the horse/owner. Because you would not believe how small of a world this is, and how quickly word travels... I know many people who have been kicked off horses because after they are done riding it they go with their "friends" and say how bad of a horse it is, and guess what it gets back to the owner.

    So basically:
    1) Work your butt off
    2) Prove yourself to these BNT or owners who have the horses of this caliber
    3) Give up all other aspects of your life
    4) Be grateful for any ride you get



  20. #20
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    Jan. 25, 2009
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    Not that it helps with 100% of your goals, and not right now, but maybe work toward a spot on a college team?
    A proud friend of bar.ka.



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