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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb. 24, 2005
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    2,268

    Default erosion plan around new construction - ideas needed

    We just completed an addition to our barn. We have to prevent erosion and prevent weeds from growing. The addtion is on a pretty tall pad that is made of "structural fill" - I'm not sure what else it is called. It's like a very heavy, dense sand or rock chip or something. It erodes badly when it rains. Some parts of it will be driveway type area. Some parts will be entry way to the barn and loafing area for horses, and some part will just be a pahtway.

    Any suggestions on what to do to stablelize this area? Thanks for any suggestions.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb. 14, 2003
    Location
    Windward Farm, Washougal, WA- our work in progress, our money pit, our home!
    Posts
    6,840

    Default

    I see two options:

    1. Put down geotextile cloth and pour heavier gravel on top.

    2. Pour heavier gravel over it.

    Is it all sloped? You might not be able to completely prevent the erosion. I know my barn was built up on a pad as well, and it is pretty well eroded away.

    You could go ahead and grade in the paths, etc, and gravel is your friend!
    Proud member of the "Don't rush to kill wildlife" clique!



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb. 24, 2005
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    2,268

    Default

    Most of it is sloped pretty steeply. Some isn't, but I'm not too concerned about the level part.
    hmmm. I don't want to have to redo it a lot.

    Part of this area is where the horses will enter the barn on a regular basis. Does that geotextile help control the mud? Do you just put the gravel on top of the geotextile?

    I appreciate your help



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug. 13, 2003
    Location
    California USA
    Posts
    740

    Default

    Where there is going to be alot of traffic either by horses or vehicles you might want to pave it with those intelocking paving stone blocks. Before you faint, I know they are not cheap but in the long run they will cut down on having to redo everything next spring. You might be able to do some slight terracing also. I have seen the round pressure treated 8Ft poles set in the dirt with stakes at the ends to stabilize them. It made long terraced steps. They were about 4 feet deep and about 10 to 12 inches high by the 8 feet.wide. There was crushed gravel put in behind the poles and it got pounded down into the dirt during the winter.
    Sounds like drainage will not be a problem. Just trying to keep the dirt on the ground around the barn. Heavy rains will erode the dirt away if you do not have something to slow down the run off.
    Hopefully there willbe more replies to your post with better idea.
    JMHO sadlmakr



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb. 24, 2005
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    2,268

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    Hi Sadlmakr, thanks for the ideas. Actually, they are *really* helpful ideas. We'll look at it tomorrow but that really sounds like it is something we could do. It didn't even occur to me to think about using the interlocking paving stones. They are often available on Craigslist anyway.

    We'll look at the terracing idea, too. That really could work I think.

    Thanks!



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar. 24, 2007
    Posts
    1,806

    Default

    Could you post some pictures so we could get a better idea of what you are up against?

    Dalemma



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb. 24, 2005
    Posts
    2,268

    Default

    I'll see what I can do about getting some pictures. Thanks!



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan. 9, 2006
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    375

    Default

    Ditto what CC said about geotextile.

    For the steep slopes without traffic, put down geotextile and then large stones that won't move with heavy rain. The geotextile in this instance will offer a bit of permeability, but will keep the soil from eroding under the stones. The large stones will break the impact of the rain drops and help prevent erosion.

    For the areas that will be getting traffic, put the geotextile down first, then put a layer of gravel suitable for vehicles or horses. The geotextile will keep the stones from going into the soil when travelled upon.
    Alison Howard
    Homestead Farms, Maryland www.freshorganicvegetables.com



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb. 24, 2005
    Posts
    2,268

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Benson View Post
    Ditto what CC said about geotextile.

    For the steep slopes without traffic, put down geotextile and then large stones that won't move with heavy rain. The geotextile in this instance will offer a bit of permeability, but will keep the soil from eroding under the stones. The large stones will break the impact of the rain drops and help prevent erosion.

    For the areas that will be getting traffic, put the geotextile down first, then put a layer of gravel suitable for vehicles or horses. The geotextile will keep the stones from going into the soil when travelled upon.
    Well, duh, you mean take those rocks that are piled up behind my loafing shed when I cleared the hay field and use them?! lol What a great idea! I don't know why I didn't think of these great ideas you three have had. My problem with the gravel was that it would wash away. The terracing and the interlocking blocks are great ideas and then the addition of the larger rocks is really helpful, too.


    I may be close to formulating a plan - I do look funny standing out starting at my problem area visualizing these ideas though!

    I really appreciate the help of this problem!



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