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  1. #21
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    It makes me mad that breeders will breed dogs with hip dysplasia because if breeders would stop breeding dogs with this problem, you would not have a dog with it.
    if buyers would refuse to buy dogs that don't come with piles of OFA certificates the breeders would stop breeding these dogs. Until then, what do they care? they offer a one-year health guarantee, and the dog doesn't show symptoms until age 5 or age 10, well, they got their money already.


    before even considering getting a dog, read all about it

    http://www.offa.org/

    some of the breeds have heart-breaking 50%, even 70% of individuals tested found to be affected with hip dysplasia.



  2. #22
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    Dec. 12, 2005
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    Myrtle Beach, SC
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    In our case, My Copper is a Pound Puppy and of unknown heritage. So there was no purchasing from a breeder here thusly no one to report.
    If i'm posting on Coth, it's either raining so I can't ride or it's night time and I can't sleep.



  3. #23
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    Oct. 21, 2008
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    The OFA certification is not as good, in my opinion (and also as published in the latest JAVMA) as a PennHIP radiograph.
    The PennHIP can be done as young as 16 weeks of age and has a better predictive value for dogs that have hip laxity, and therefore, that will develop osteoarthritis from hip dysplasia.



  4. #24
    Join Date
    Jan. 26, 2010
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    87

    Default Not always preventable

    And please remember that while all reputable breeders will have their dogs OFA or Penn Hip certified, it is completely possible to breed two dogs who OFA Excellent and come up with dogs who are Fair or Poor. When buying a puppy you should always see the certifications of the parents and ask to see if the breeder knows what the siblings of the parents hips certified as. It is shown that the siblings of the parents show a more rounded picture of what the puppies might turn out with.

    For example if I got a puppy from OFA Excellent mom and dad who both had OFA Fair siblings I have more of a chance of having a HD puppy than if I get a puppy from OFA Good mom and dad with OFA Excellent siblings.

    Bry



  5. #25
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    Jun. 20, 2001
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    Glenns, VA USA
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    Quote Originally Posted by scheherazadetbmare View Post
    there is bute which helps.
    Bute is not a good pain reliever in the dog and high risk for gastric ulcer. Other NSAIDs such as Rimadyl would be preferable (unless ur a lab, very low risk of liver toxicity, hx of liver enzyme elevation does NOT put pet at higher risk on rimadyl, and if liver values are unchg'd w/in 2 wks, do not need to be re-eval'd again), there are others such as deramaxx and previcox but again, know for great possibility for gastric ulcers/perfs. Metacam is another NSAID, and reasonable as long as no history of renal insufficiency and pet stays well hydrated!
    www.brydellefarm.com ....developing riders, NOT passengers!
    Member of LNHorsemanshipT & Proud of It Clique
    "What gets me up every morning is realizing how much more there is still to learn." -GHM



  6. #26
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    well, when you get a "pound puppy" or "rescue", kudos to you, but unfortunately the persons willing to buy dogs/puppies from dogs who aren't heavily proven to be as healthy as possible using all of the best most modern tests are reducing the chances that your dog of unknown origin will also be healthy. Contamination of the gene pools with bad genes.
    It is actually very unlikely that hip dysplasia will ever be completely eliminated from the dog, since its occurence seems to be a very complex interaction between genetics and environment- there was a study in lab puppies where simply not-over-feeding during development dramatically reduced the rate of hip dysplasia. So you could have a breeder trying to do everything right who raises her own dogs on proper diets and gets no hip dysplasia, but when her pup buyers overfeed/feed wrong the pups they get the problem. The "hip laxity" test of pennhip may be one way to address this particular problem.



  7. #27
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    Apr. 20, 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by scheherazadetbmare View Post

    ...and there is bute which helps.
    Bute is not usually a good thing for dogs - it can be toxic to their bone marrow cells. However, Pancakes listed a number of good options for pain control that are safe for dogs.

    I do agree with scheherazadetbmare that working with a good vet is definitely a good idea.



  8. #28
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    Dec. 31, 2000
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    El Paso, TX
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    Another vote for trying to do a surgical option on the dog, since being young, it would usually have a really good outcome.



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