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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun. 11, 2007
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    Default Pull-On Bell Boots

    Exactly how do you get these on?

    I needed new bells for Gus, as his current pair has bit the dust. Unfortunately the tack shop I stopped by today only had the pull-on ones.

    Is it really as easy as turning it inside out and putting the hoof through the big "bell" first and then wedging the hoof through the narrow opening, then flipping the bell back out? Or, am I missing something?

    Thanks!
    Proud owner of Gus & Gringo.
    See G2's blog
    Photos



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug. 9, 2002
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    USA
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    Default

    It really is as easy as you described. Some pull-ons are easier to get on than others; I find the Alprima bell boots that Beval's sells the best in terms of ease of application and longevity. My guy lives in them 24/7 and a pair usually lasts him about 6 months.

    If you find them difficult to stretch on, put them in some hot water for a few minutes. Helps them stretch easily



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar. 28, 2002
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    Default

    Pretty much that easy but you may find a short soak in very warm water will help as it softens the boot a bit and the water provides lubrication.
    Founder of the Dyslexic Clique. Dyslexics of the world - UNTIE!!

    Member: Incredible Invisbles



  4. #4
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    Jan. 16, 2002
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    Default

    Well, it's "that easy" if the boots are nice and pliable and not too small. I hate putting on bell boots, but if you have the right size and good quality ones, it's not TOO hateful.
    Click here before you buy.



  5. #5
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    Jun. 11, 2007
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    Minnesota
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    Default

    Thanks guys. I wouldn't have thought about soaking/wetting with hot water. Definitely makes sense.

    Now, how hard are they to remove? Or what do your farriers do with them when they are hot-setting shoes?
    Proud owner of Gus & Gringo.
    See G2's blog
    Photos



  6. #6
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    Aug. 9, 2002
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    USA
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    Default

    They're not hard to remove; just pull them off with the foot in the air (you don't have to turn them inside out like you did when you put them on). I usually brace the foot on my leg to reduce torque on the leg.

    Or you could flip the boot up and pull it up over the fetlock for shoeing. I cheat and do this when my BF shoes my horse - it doesn't get in the way of burning the shoe on



  7. #7
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    Jun. 11, 2007
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    Minnesota
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by tarynls View Post
    They're not hard to remove; just pull them off with the foot in the air (you don't have to turn them inside out like you did when you put them on). I usually brace the foot on my leg to reduce torque on the leg.

    Or you could flip the boot up and pull it up over the fetlock for shoeing. I cheat and do this when my BF shoes my horse - it doesn't get in the way of burning the shoe on
    Thanks!
    Proud owner of Gus & Gringo.
    See G2's blog
    Photos



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug. 6, 2010
    Location
    Chicago Suburbs
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    81

    Default

    To help pull them on, I usually brace my horse's knee against my knee (so if it was his right leg, it would be against my right knee, and my torso would be facing towards him - if that makes sense) so I have something to hold his leg steady while I pull.

    I also brace his hoof against my knee while I pull them off.

    Once you get the hang of it, it's pretty easy.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun. 25, 2007
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    2,254

    Default

    I turn mine inside out, and put Vaseline on the "inside" part that I just "made"....the part that will be rubbing against my horse's hoof and shoe to get on.....rest his leg on mine and pull. The vaseline has always helped. Once you get the hang of it, it will get easier. Good luck!



  10. #10
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    May. 17, 2000
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    Default

    and really, stay away from non "gum" rubber types. There's something about that red rubber that is a lot easier than the black or white ones (except for alprimas).
    Definition of "Horse": a 4 legged mammal looking for an inconvenient place and expensive way to die. Any day they choose not to execute the Master Plan is just more time to perfect it. Be Very Afraid.



  11. #11
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    Mar. 9, 2006
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    South-Central PA
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    Default

    so if your horse normally wears a size med in a velcro bell boot, would you order the same size in a gum pull-on? My guy just got new shoes on Thursday, and he's hard on bell boots. If I can get more life out of pull-ons, I"m inclined to learn to work with them, but it seems the key is getting the right size...
    Cindy



  12. #12
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    at least with the dover brand boots I just bought, the sizes were identical.
    Definition of "Horse": a 4 legged mammal looking for an inconvenient place and expensive way to die. Any day they choose not to execute the Master Plan is just more time to perfect it. Be Very Afraid.



  13. #13
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    Aug. 16, 2009
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    Default

    Make sure they're big enough - #1

    And #2 - buy the better brand. KL Select and Beval both make great pull ons. If you buy the cheap ones, you'll be struggling.

    I prefer pull ons to anything. Just this last week a horse got gashed like you wouldn't believe from the velcro on his bell boots. Poor kid. Couldn't figure out why he was head bobbing but not lame at first until I went to take his boots off...

    And to get them off - I just put the horse's hoof on my thigh, grab the top of the bell boot and just pull it off. Pretty soon the horses get the game and try to "help" you by pulling against your pressure. Sometimes they're helpful...sometimes, not so much.



  14. #14
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    Jun. 11, 2007
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    Well, I got them on... but boy were they a pain in the rear! The hot water trick helped, a bit. Glad I at least knew about that.

    Next time I need to get new boots though, I'll be spending a few extra $$ and getting the nicer bells.
    Proud owner of Gus & Gringo.
    See G2's blog
    Photos



  15. #15
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    Oct. 29, 2000
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    Southern Pines, N.C.
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    Default

    I get them on pretty easily by facing backwards and positioning the horse's leg between my 2 legs with his knee in my crotch and my legs together at about a 45* angle.

    That way, when I am pulling, I am pulling his foot/leg into my crotch and it is wedged in there so I have leverage.

    As soon as the bell boot has cleared the shoe all the way around I let the foot drop and finish pulling the boot up with the foot in the ground. Then I turn them right side in and Bob's your Uncle!

    When I take them off I face forward and put the hoof [on a towel] on my thigh. Then with 2 fingers on either side of the bulbs of the heel I get one side over the bulb, then the other. The bell boot slides right off.

    If my horse still loses shoes or over reaches even with bell boots, I use 2 on each foot. The top bell boot holds the bottom one down so it can't lift up with each stride.

    Once on, the horses live in their bell boots. If their legs get wet, I pull the boots up over their ankles and turn them inside out until the pasterns dry off. I also do this after I give the horses a bath or any other time the foot gets wet.

    I buy the cheapest gum rubber bell boots and have always been happy with them.
    "I used to have money, now I have horses."



  16. #16
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    Jun. 26, 2000
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    I live in Chantilly, VA but I ride in Anytown, USA
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    You want the ones that say they are made of Italian gum. Or made in Italy. Those are the ones that Beval carries. And, oddly, I have bought two pair of the Beval ones from Dover. They have Beval's ubiquitious "LTD" symbol on them. Clearly, the people that make them for Beval are also selling to Dover but think the LTD is innoquous enough to turn a blind eye. I guess?

    Dover's
    Beval's

    "If you have the time, spend it. If you have a hand, lend it. If you have the money, give it. If you have a heart, share it." by me



  17. #17
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    I have found that the gum colored version of Dover boots (cheap cheap) as easy to pull on as the Al primas (not as cheap). The advantage of al primas is the Dover sizing runs small IMO (so small that my 3 year old in the 0 shoe wears a large - but then so does my older horse w/the size 2) and they only go to XL. So if you have a horse with a size 4 (I can speak with some experience here), you have to get the al primas because even the XL dover ain't cutting it. Also if you want to use a color other than gum, I would suggest al primas as well. Something about those non-natural color dovers that I do not find as stretchy...
    Definition of "Horse": a 4 legged mammal looking for an inconvenient place and expensive way to die. Any day they choose not to execute the Master Plan is just more time to perfect it. Be Very Afraid.



  18. #18
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    Mar. 9, 2006
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Anyplace Farm View Post
    You want the ones that say they are made of Italian gum. Or made in Italy. Those are the ones that Beval carries. And, oddly, I have bought two pair of the Beval ones from Dover. They have Beval's ubiquitious "LTD" symbol on them. Clearly, the people that make them for Beval are also selling to Dover but think the LTD is innoquous enough to turn a blind eye. I guess?

    Dover's
    Beval's
    I just ordered the KL Select ones from Smartpak - $29.99 and they list that they are made in Italy. I'll keep my fingers crossed that these are decent quality.
    Cindy



  19. #19
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    Aug. 19, 2010
    Location
    Harvard MA
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    274

    Default

    I used to buy the Italian Jumper ones from Dover, that were $24.90, then $26.90, now $29.90, while the length of time they lasted seemed to be decreasing year by year... so then decided to try the $9.90 version from Dover that also said "stretchy", these are really great, easy to get on, and seem to last just as long as the expensive Italian jumper ones. So would recommend trying those.
    http://www.doversaddlery.com/easy-st...1-0410/cn/120/
    these other $9.90 ones are good too
    http://www.doversaddlery.com/equi-st...1-0406/cn/120/



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Mar. 26, 2001
    Location
    Los Angeles, California
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    Default

    I agree with those who say to buy the more expensive brand. I like the Beval or the Italian Jumper ones from Dover.

    One tip that I didn't see anyone else mention is to put hoof oil/conditioner on your horse's feet before pulling on the boots. I do this first, then flip the boots over and they slide pretty easily over the hoof. I also leave them on all the time. My farrier just pulls them up over the fetlock for shoeing.



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