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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr. 28, 2009
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    Default How long to withhold hay/grain after sedation?

    Just curious what your vets recommend. I seem to get different answers/opinions every time I have a different vet. I had my old guy's teeth floated today and he ended up using Dormosedan, Xylazine, and Torbuterol (sp?). He was practically falling over and STILL fighting them. Regardless, he was pretty conked afterward and the vet just recommended keeping him inside off the grass until he came around in about an hour. He said normal hay and grain tonight but grazing wouldn't matter. My previous vet would say to keep him off grazing for the rest of the day. Just curious...



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun. 12, 2007
    Location
    Westchester County, NY
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    My vet says take away grain and hay (not water) until they appear normal. Then we take them for a nice hand walk to get things flowing again. If they seem to walk normally and act normally, they get their hay back. This could be anywhere from 30 minutes to a few hours depending on what was used and how much. We typically bran mash them at their next meal (just for safety re: water intake).



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep. 26, 2008
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    Default

    I always heard atleast an hour or until they look aleret



  4. #4
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    Apr. 7, 2007
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    Tennessee
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    I just leave mine alone. They get teeth done, stand in their pastures until it wears off, and then go back to grazing. I do wait around and make sure they don't go drown themselves in their water troughs by forgetting what they're doing if they need a drink. Other than that, they can graze as soon as they have their wits about them and want to. Heck, that's my sign the dope is wearing off when they go back out to graze. I always have teeth done after their breakfast and they only get fed once a day so that's really a non issue. And mine are on pasture, no hay. I'd wait at least a couple of hours until they were completely normal before I gave them any hay or grain if I had to. I would be concerned with choke more than anything.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan. 21, 2010
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    Default

    I've always had different answers, and would be overly cautious, then a vet gave me a really good test-

    If a horse can rip the hay (or grass) out of your hand, they're probably ok to eat. If they're too drunk, they'll just mouth it and try to chew without actually ripping it first (like when they're grazing).



  6. #6
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    Apr. 28, 2009
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    Default

    Lol, he was so out of it I was worried about drowning too. He has his head drooping over his dutch door and sounded like he was choking himself. I went to peek at him and he's totally alert but is still covered from head to foot in sweat. Can't remember which drug it was but they said it was caused by one of them.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec. 21, 2009
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    740

    Default

    3 hours for grain, since sedatives lower gut motility.
    Hay or grass they can have when they wake up-- 30 minutes usually.
    Water should be emptied if the horse is really sedated, or horse should be watched. My vet had a horse that literally drowned itself in the water bucket after sedation.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec. 31, 2007
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    AreaII
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    1,348

    Default

    I always always pull their water buckets as well. No grain, hay, water for at least an hour or they are "obviously" alert. Nothing like finding one buried in the bucket and have to lift a head and a full bucket up to unlatch it. (ok - that only happened once and it had just happened -but I never gave it a chance to happen again!).

    Be sure they aren't just awake- but alert.

    It won't hurt them to go without for 2 hours. I watch their heads on the dutch doors (and feed doors) also- as I've had a few rest there and really scare me into thinking they were cutting off their own air supply.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov. 4, 2003
    Location
    Dallas, Georgia
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    Since mine are drafties that show the draftie tendency to get totally slap-happy, about-to-go-boom drunk with 1/2 the dose a "light" horse would get, I give 'em a full hour or more to be in a hay-free stall... just water.
    <>< Sorrow Looks Back. Worry Looks Around. Faith Looks Up! -- Being negative only makes a difficult journey more difficult. You may be given a cactus, but you don't have to sit on it.



  10. #10
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    Apr. 28, 2009
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ChocoMare View Post
    Since mine are drafties that show the draftie tendency to get totally slap-happy, about-to-go-boom drunk with 1/2 the dose a "light" horse would get, I give 'em a full hour or more to be in a hay-free stall... just water.
    I love drafties. My little paint horse on the other hand... the vet told me with his age he physically could not give him any more sedatives. He's so embarrassing when he acts like that.



  11. #11
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    Nov. 4, 2003
    Location
    Dallas, Georgia
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by dmalbone View Post
    I love drafties. My little paint horse on the other hand... the vet told me with his age he physically could not give him any more sedatives. He's so embarrassing when he acts like that.


    Yeah, during one teeth-float visit, new/interning vet drew up the Dormosedan for my vet... my vet looks and says "Oh no, push 1/2 that back." New vet says "Um, but this mare weighs 2,000 pounds?" My vet replies "Yes, but 2,000 pounds o'Percheron will fall down dead with that much."
    <>< Sorrow Looks Back. Worry Looks Around. Faith Looks Up! -- Being negative only makes a difficult journey more difficult. You may be given a cactus, but you don't have to sit on it.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    May. 17, 2003
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    5,618

    Default

    Interesting how the "chunkier" horses seem to be such lightweights.

    My very solid appy is a half-doser, too. Vet and I learned that the hard way when we got him stuck in the stocks after giving him a standard dose once. he was sort of slumped down like a drunk at a bar, with his neck over the rail at the front, and there was no way that just the vet and I were going to be able to do anything about it--"hold his head up!" the vet says... uh, right, it's about 100lbs of dead weight...

    That's when I learned about sedation reversal drugs. Hard on the system but better than asphyxiating.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Sep. 8, 2007
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    My vet always says to wait until the horse looks completely alert and back to normal. For my horse it's usually one hour.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Mar. 26, 2005
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    Back to Normal.. or as close as I'll ever get
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    Default

    What morganpony said

    My sweet Vern used to fight the tranq and require a booster halfway through the procedure.
    Vet used a mix of xylazine & dormosedan.
    When it finally kicked in, TG for the stocks or he would have gone horizontal for sure!

    Then it would take near 1/2 hour before it was safe to try loading him for the ride home.

    In the meantime he'd stand there looking for all the world like Lee Marvin's horse in Cat Ballou.

    We knew he was coming out of it when he'd take a mouthful of grass and not let it just dribble out his mouth.

    IIWM, I'd withhold all grain for the rest of the day and wet the hay if you had no pasture to let him recover in.
    *friend of bar.ka*RIP all my lovely boys, gone too soon:
    Steppin' Out 1988-2004
    Hey Vern! 1982-2009
    Cash's Bay Threat 1994-2009



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Feb. 15, 2004
    Location
    Ontario
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    Just came back from the barn where we had to sedate my mare for digital head xrays. She got Rompum (2 injections but not sure how much) and she was pretty out of it (she is a Clyde cross), ears horizontal and head low and she was still fighting it! Vet said to withhold hay/water and access to bedding for 1/2 hour to 45 minutes. We tied her up in the stall and stood by. She was totally alert and back "with us" in 20 minutes, but waited the full 45 minutes. She did untied herself which was a good indication that she was back to normal. She is staying in her stall for a few more hours, but will go back out later.

    Last week, she had some Dormosedan for the endoscopy, but she never showed signs of drowsiness!!



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jan. 14, 2005
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    Aiken SC / Fay NC
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    Default

    I would actually remove water buckets from the stalls also, or stay RIGHT THERE watching.

    Had a tranq'd horse post teeth floating in a stall (no hay). I walked away for about 20 seconds to get something, came back, and he had his face IN the water bucket.
    FREE TACK/APPAREL ADS: BITS AND BARTER BOARD: http://bitsandbarter.proboards.com/i...ay&thread=5450



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jan. 17, 2010
    Location
    Saline, Michigan
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    Default

    I worked/boarded at a co-op barn for a while and one of the owners there had some good advice - which was to withhold the water for longer. One of his horses had a habit of resting his muzzle in the bottom of his water bucket when he was doped up, which is obviously not good unless it's empty. Hay/grain - what others said - I think at least an hour or until they seem alert enough to eat properly.



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Jun. 7, 2005
    Location
    Rochester, NY
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    Default

    I usually just wait until they are alert again. Depending on what they've had...anywhere from 30 minutes to a few hours.
    <3 Vinnie <3
    1992-2010
    Jackie's Punt ("Bailey") My Finger Lakes Finest Thoroughbred



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Dec. 16, 2007
    Location
    Oklahoma
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    203

    Default

    I didn't realize draft horses were such lightweights! My little 800-900 pound Arabians always require more tranq than other horses. I teased my vet about crazy Ay-rabs, he just laughed and said it's something about their metabolism.

    Liz



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Feb. 28, 2006
    Location
    The rocky part of KY
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    Default

    Ours went out into the pasture as soon as they could walk straight and ate dinner at their normal time. They were sedated at roughly 10AM and dinner is around 7PM. Pasture at around noon thirty.
    Courageous Weenie Eventer Wannabe
    Incredible Invisible



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