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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar. 20, 2001
    Posts
    522

    Default cheap mounting block?

    The older I get, the more rickety that step ladder that I use to mount my 17h horse looks. However, those nice, stable plastic ones from the tack shop cost a fortune! Anyone know of any cheap models?



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr. 22, 2005
    Posts
    450

    Default

    Totally understand the age thing. One of my horses is 17h and it is a long way up. So I made a mounting block out of broken fence boards (on a 2"x4" frame). Only thing I bought was the paint. Heavy as heck, but very sturdy!
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  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec. 1, 2007
    Location
    Gettysburg, PA
    Posts
    2,632

    Default

    My DH did the same thing and built one for me out of scrap wood. As stated, they do weigh more than the plastic versions, but I like cheap
    Epona Farm
    Irish Draughts and Irish Sport horses

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  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul. 25, 2003
    Location
    Boston Area
    Posts
    8,387

    Default

    I use a supplement bucket. It's sturdy, lasts forever and cheap. It doubles as a wash bucket too!
    Equine Ink - My soapbox for equestrian writings & reviews.
    EquestrianHow2 - Operating instructions for your horse.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct. 15, 2002
    Location
    MA
    Posts
    807

    Default

    Rubbermaid makes a very stable, but lightweight plastic step stool and it's cheap!

    http://www.restockit.com/two-step-fo...urce=CJproduct




  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr. 1, 2003
    Location
    hamburg, pa USA
    Posts
    475

    Default

    I use a bathtub transfer bench.

    http://www.medexsupply.com/personal-...pid-38108.html

    It was taking up room in the garage, so one day when I was complaining to SO about building a mounting block, he pulled this out. Work great, is very study, portable and the legs adjust to various heights.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb. 23, 2005
    Location
    Spotsylvania, VA
    Posts
    13,132

    Default

    Mr P made this for me out of scrap lumber. We call it my handicapped access. The platform is at stirrup height so I just have to swing my leg over my mare
    http://picasaweb.google.com/carolp32...37229065919394
    I wasn't always a Smurf
    Penmerryl's Sophie RIDSH
    "I ain't as good as I once was but I'm as good once as I ever was"
    The ignore list is my friend. It takes 2 to argue.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct. 6, 2004
    Location
    central New York State
    Posts
    2,847

    Default

    We have a few of the household Rubbermaid two step-step stools. They work like a charm, are light weight, hold 300 pounds, have a large step area, and really last. We have left our out all winter, brought them to shows etc.

    I think they are less than $20.00 and I could get on my 18.3 hand clydesdale from it and not have to drop my stirrups-I am 5.5".



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    40,915

    Default

    I would be leery to use something a horse may step around and stick a foot in there and get it hung on it's leg, with you not quite settled in the saddle yet.

    They have those same size stools with solid sides, that I think would be much safer around horses.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct. 11, 2002
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    4,650

    Default

    I get a full round tree section about 2' X 2' from a firewood dealer, and just leave it in the arena untill it gets gnawed (sp? is that a word?) way down by turnout horses, then get a new one.
    Comprehensive Equestrian Site Planning and Facility Design
    www.lynnlongplanninganddesign.com



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Apr. 25, 2004
    Location
    Lexington, KY
    Posts
    1,519

    Default

    Warning about cheap plastic ones....they can sometimes begin to collapse in the middle.

    My old college now has a 3 step one and heavy duty but more expensive plastic ones. These are great.

    They also have a cheaper rubber one, that has sunk down in the middle. Of course this is the one in the ring that I ride in It sinks down a few inches when I stand on it making it more difficult for me to get on a horse.

    If you go the plastic mounting block route....don't go cheap as it will cost you more hassles in the end. I like the things that others here posted they look nice
    "The horse you get off f is not the same horse you got on. It is your job as a rider to ensure that as often as possible, the change is for the better" - unknown author



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Sep. 13, 2002
    Location
    Pacific Northwest
    Posts
    4,998

    Default

    This is the Rubbermaid two-step that I've used at times http://www.rubbermaid.com/Category/P...od_ID=RP091079. It is cheap and available at places like Target, Walmart, etc. They don't stand up to being driven over by a horse trailer (trainer did it, not me), but otherwise pretty durable, yet lightweight. Might not be tall enough for some people. I like using it for braiding/mane pulling on young and dumb horses as I feel safer about their legs and the plastic vs. their legs in a metal stool.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Apr. 25, 2004
    Location
    Lexington, KY
    Posts
    1,519

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by horsepoor View Post
    This is the Rubbermaid two-step that I've used at times http://www.rubbermaid.com/Category/P...od_ID=RP091079. It is cheap and available at places like Target, Walmart, etc. They don't stand up to being driven over by a horse trailer (trainer did it, not me), but otherwise pretty durable, yet lightweight. Might not be tall enough for some people. I like using it for braiding/mane pulling on young and dumb horses as I feel safer about their legs and the plastic vs. their legs in a metal stool.
    Thats the one I used when I leased in the summer....I stole it from my mom's closet she didn't want it back after I told her it was brought to the barn
    "The horse you get off f is not the same horse you got on. It is your job as a rider to ensure that as often as possible, the change is for the better" - unknown author



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jan. 5, 2010
    Posts
    2,152

    Default

    I use a step ladder. Or a log jump. Or in my future plans, simply a large cut log round.

    Logs are plentiful and cheap. Cut one squarely, cut one to comfortable size, and place them liberally about the trails for adventures :=)



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Oct. 29, 1999
    Posts
    14,488

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Plumcreek View Post
    I get a full round tree section about 2' X 2' from a firewood dealer
    Good idea! A chunk of a tree stump would work great - especially if it is oak, so not tasty.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Feb. 3, 2005
    Location
    Southern Ontario
    Posts
    910

    Default

    I made my own out of plywood, just two steps, and a nice big top on it. We call it the 'old lady' mounting block. I designed it so the top is pretty much stirrup length height for me. It is a bit heavy, but I put rope handles on the sides so that I could drag it wherever I needed it.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Aug. 16, 2009
    Posts
    665

    Default

    My vet does chiropractic too. She said it's really best to mount from something high enough that you won't pull the saddle sideways trying to mount. The repeated action of pulling the saddle left while trying to get on tends to put the horse's withers out too.

    I use a step stool but it would scare me if my horses didn't stand stock still when I mounted. Luckily, I teach them to stand stock still but I wouldn't want just anyone mounting on those stools that have openings - that's an ugly picture if a horse steps in it...



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Dec. 27, 2006
    Posts
    2,058

    Default

    I weigh 200 # stripped and even though my horses are only 15 hands and a smidge, my weight, age, and general decripitude made it essentially impossible for me to mount from the ground when I began my latest stint of reriding at age 52 (I'm pushing 57 now) so I am ever so familar with the mounting block problem. My riding buddy has similar age and comformation and her horse is at least 16.2 on a short day. And we trail ride, so we cant take mounting blocks with us. Currently buddy (who despite riding this gigantic beast, swears she gets a nose bleed if she uses her THREE stop block, uses a two step Rubbermaid stool, which is quite a bit easier to sling into the trailer when she hauls out to ride at my place.)

    I started out using stacked concrete pavers. Advantage--height can be adjusted fairly easily (my thinking being that I would decrease the height of the stack as I got fitter. Yeah, right.) Only problem being, at that time, neither horse was at all interested in making it easy for me to mount, and became adept at inching away from the blocks, so that I would cuss, move the horse if I could, and the pavers (puff, puff, pant) if I couldnt. I graduated to a nice molded plastic two step block, and used it to train the nags, since I could chase them with it until they gave up. Currently it lives in the barn, on TOP of a pallet, so that its even higher. I can use it to mount up without any real pull on either horse or saddle. I got it from either jeffers or horse.com for under 40 bucks. Here's the Jeffers one: http://www.jeffersequine.com/ssc/pro...NWF9JELH293EAC

    Note price has gone up.

    That takes us to the problem of what to do when, as we often must, we dismount on the trail. Usually there is a stump or a log or a drywall compound bucket or something close by. When there isnt, we get creative, using dirt banks, ditches, creekbanks and so on. After several years of this my two horses and her guy have become The Best at standing like statues next to anything and everything. Just yesterday I managed to not spot a barbed wire fence before my gelding put his foot through it. He's very good at staying calm to be extricated, and I got him out unscathed in a few seconds, but I had to dismount and stand on the bottom strand of wire to give him room to back out of it. We were no where close to a convenient stump. I found a little hump of dirt, put him downhill from it, and psyched myself up and got up with no real problem. It was that or walk half a mile to a better spot, which proved to be sufficient motivation.

    I was by myself, but if buddy had been with me she couldve parked her horse next to mine, put a foot in my offside stirrup, leaned across my saddle, and given me a hand up--we've pulled this stunt before. She says that back when she was a girl and riding bareback with a friend one would give the other a leg up, then the girl now mounted would reach across the other horse and haul the girl on the ground up. That's teamwork!



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    40,915

    Default

    You can get this mounting aid, carry it along with you.

    First, you need to be sure the cinch is tight, then you can use that, if you don't make a habit of it.
    It is hard on the horse's back to climb slowly as you will have to:

    http://www.chicksaddlery.com/page/CDS/PROD/1087/MS40

    They have one for English saddle stirrups, that hangs directly from the stirrup, but I can't find a link right now.



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Dec. 19, 2009
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    1,287

    Default

    Yes, about the rubbermaid step stool... we have one and use it but with extreme caution!!!! A couple years ago my daughter was getting on a new horse (not green, but new) and even with me on the ground ready to help out, the horse took one step sideways and somehow tipped the stool AND put her leg through it. The good news is that the stool breaks very easily and then actually goes back together again. The bad news is that it can really freak a horse out to have a stool fold up on their leg and become attached to them.



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