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  1. #21
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    What snoopy said.

    Especially the part about people from the north.



  2. #22
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    I personally rarely venture north of watford, but before I get dumped on:
    I have a great fondness for The North...after all half of my earnings go there to support teenage mothers and benefit cheats.



  3. #23
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    Psssch, better to be from the North than a Southern Fairy
    Back on topic, what an awful thing to happen! Poor horse I hope all that dashing of Olympic dreams rubbish is journalistic license, surely the rider must be distraught.
    The horse has a British Dressage record aswell, but was competing at Elementary so not really on track for London, but they love to include "2012 hopeful" or "friend of Zara" in a story



  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by nomeolvides View Post
    Psssch, better to be from the North than a Southern Fairy
    Back on topic, what an awful thing to happen! Poor horse I hope all that dashing of Olympic dreams rubbish is journalistic license, surely the rider must be distraught.
    The horse has a British Dressage record aswell, but was competing at Elementary so not really on track for London, but they love to include "2012 hopeful" or "friend of Zara" in a story


    I love you for seeing the pisstake.
    Southern Fairy indeed....



  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by snoopy View Post
    I personally rarely venture north of watford, but before I get dumped on:
    I have a great fondness for The North...after all half of my earnings go there to support teenage mothers and benefit cheats.
    Hold the phone. . . I have to go get my wine
    RIP Kelly 1977-2007 "Wither thou goest, so shall I"

    "To tilt when you should withdraw is Knightly too."



  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by snoopy View Post
    No, very serious! Having lived in both countries I can assure you of that. I am talking about horse related incidents. I never had to lock my tack, trailer, mark my rugs, my horse, worry about rugs being nicked from their backs, christ people are even stealing hay now. I can whole heartedly say, that if you stand still long enough in the UK someone would steal the fillings from your teeth. You are from the North, so you should be used to that.


    As far as rented fields and people not living on site...it is far more common in the UK then in the US. I hardly see horses left unattended in fields on the side of motorways and A roads in the US. It is quite common to have yards that have no living accomodations.

    So there...
    What nonsense! So there....



  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas_1 View Post
    What nonsense! So there....
    You keep saying what nonsense etc yet you cannot back up what you say with facts? *sorry if I am reading this wrong and you are joking/being sarcastic*.

    Personally, I have to agree with snoopy on this one. Having lived in both countries, I think it is far more common in the UK for people to rent fields and leave the horses unsupervised most of the day. In the US, DIY is uncommon in general & most boarding stables have someone on the premises at least in my experience. When I spent a summer in Yorkshire I knew a number of people who kept their horses in rented fields. Not saying there is anything wrong with this as long as the horses are cared for/checked up on regularly, just that it's a different way of doing things, and as JER says you can see why it would be more likely to lead to crime.
    "Choose to chance the rapids, and dare to dance the tides" - Garth Brooks
    "With your permission, dear, I'll take my fences one at a time" - Maggie Smith, Downton Abbey



  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Event4Life View Post
    You keep saying what nonsense etc yet you cannot back up what you say with facts? *sorry if I am reading this wrong and you are joking/being sarcastic*.

    Personally, I have to agree with snoopy on this one. Having lived in both countries, I think it is far more common in the UK for people to rent fields and leave the horses unsupervised most of the day. In the US, DIY is uncommon in general & most boarding stables have someone on the premises at least in my experience. When I spent a summer in Yorkshire I knew a number of people who kept their horses in rented fields. Not saying there is anything wrong with this as long as the horses are cared for/checked up on regularly, just that it's a different way of doing things, and as JER says you can see why it would be more likely to lead to crime.


    agreed!!!! It is just a different cuture and anything left unsupervised for great lengths of time is at risk.

    That is not to say that some pissing smart yards with all the security measures in place are not targeted, quite the contrary as if someone is going to chance their luck (tack and equipment) then that is the place to do it.

    You read over and over of thoudands of pounds of tack was knicked from a secured, locked, alarmed tack room, trailers being stolen, etc.
    I have yet to see a wheel lock or ball lock on a trailer in the US.

    I am not saying that this is purely a UK thing but in my experience it is definitely more common.



  9. #29
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    [QUOTE=snoopy;5105070]No, very serious! Having lived in both countries I can assure you of that. I am talking about horse related incidents. I never had to lock my tack, trailer, mark my rugs, my horse, worry about rugs being nicked from their backs, christ people are even stealing hay now. I can whole heartedly say, that if you stand still long enough in the UK someone would steal the fillings from your teeth. You are from the North, so you should be used to that.


    in answer- thieves nick general law biding horse and ponies owners dont


    As far as rented fields and people not living on site...it is far more common in the UK then in the US. I hardly see horses left unattended in fields on the side of motorways and A roads in the US. It is quite common to have yards that have no living accomodations.

    So there..


    as iam one of many of the horse owner crowd that does rent field doesnt mean to say the horses and poniesare not looked at on daily basis becuase rest assured they are looked more times than you think

    horses and pony owner that have grass kept horses often have an arrangement with fellow field mates to do neds alturnately this in lcudes hay rotas for winter etc or rotating fields have grown up in diffrent envrioments of both field kept, and lvieries yards to include full and assited plus
    the majority of horse /pony owners redn from stable yards that offer box and grazzing as well as grass kept -

    under each one there are rules to adherd to many livery yards are in fact bhs registered so follow the protocol of the bhs riding centres rules and regulartions etc those that dont often use the bhs rules a guide to which they run the yard to

    those are the majority of joe bloggs horse owners

    the others are one that have full livery, assisted livery, part livery and working lviery
    are associated with private yards, riding schools and show centres etc
    we are very fortunate to have a vary degree of livery types and those types of which equal to our pocket costs of comfort


    in answer to the neddies on the road sides

    that isnt every day joe bloggs horse or pony owner

    more likely to be that of a gypsie. piky, traveller or rouge
    or
    thief



  10. #30
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    [QUOTE=goeslikestink;5105886]
    Quote Originally Posted by snoopy View Post
    No, very serious! Having lived in both countries I can assure you of that. I am talking about horse related incidents. I never had to lock my tack, trailer, mark my rugs, my horse, worry about rugs being nicked from their backs, christ people are even stealing hay now. I can whole heartedly say, that if you stand still long enough in the UK someone would steal the fillings from your teeth. You are from the North, so you should be used to that.


    in answer- thieves nick general law biding horse and ponies owners dont


    As far as rented fields and people not living on site...it is far more common in the UK then in the US. I hardly see horses left unattended in fields on the side of motorways and A roads in the US. It is quite common to have yards that have no living accomodations.

    So there..


    as iam one of many of the horse owner crowd that does rent field doesnt mean to say the horses and poniesare not looked at on daily basis becuase rest assured they are looked more times than you think

    horses and pony owner that have grass kept horses often have an arrangement with fellow field mates to do neds alturnately this in lcudes hay rotas for winter etc or rotating fields have grown up in diffrent envrioments of both field kept, and lvieries yards to include full and assited plus
    the majority of horse /pony owners redn from stable yards that offer box and grazzing as well as grass kept -

    under each one there are rules to adherd to many livery yards are in fact bhs registered so follow the protocol of the bhs riding centres rules and regulartions etc those that dont often use the bhs rules a guide to which they run the yard to

    those are the majority of joe bloggs horse owners

    the others are one that have full livery, assisted livery, part livery and working lviery
    are associated with private yards, riding schools and show centres etc
    we are very fortunate to have a vary degree of livery types and those types of which equal to our pocket costs of comfort


    in answer to the neddies on the road sides

    that isnt every day joe bloggs horse or pony owner

    more likely to be that of a gypsie. piky, traveller or rouge
    or
    thief

    Nobody is debating the merits of field kept horses or grass livery and I am well aware of the arrangements many have when horses are kept in this manner or on a DIY basis.

    But what I am saying is that it is eaiser for those folk who dabble in horse related theft to target those types of operations for rugs and such.

    I know many kept in this manner and often these horses look better then my own!!!



  11. #31
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    GLS - reread my post, I actually specifically said just because horses are kept in rented fields does not mean they are lacking in care...just that they are more likely to be targets for thieves as thieves will know there is not someone there 24/7, and probably no security system barring the obvious locked gates that you see a lot in the UK.

    Not saying it doesn't happen in the US too... but it also helps that in general everything is more spread out in the US. Makes it harder to get places especially if they are down miles of backroads, which 3 of the 4 stables I have boarded at in the states have been. Whereas in the UK horses are more likely to be boarded next to motorways, closer to cities (read: more crime) etc.
    "Choose to chance the rapids, and dare to dance the tides" - Garth Brooks
    "With your permission, dear, I'll take my fences one at a time" - Maggie Smith, Downton Abbey



  12. #32
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    I always thought the US was the crime-riddled gathering place of misfits, miscreants and naughty minxes. You know, "the floor sweepings of Europe" etc. (or is that Australia?) Frankly, in a lot of places in the US I would be terrified to break into a rural barn, I am completely ill equipped to outrun a bullet. A tragic and heartbreaking story nonetheless.



  13. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by riderboy View Post
    Frankly, in a lot of places in the US I would be terrified to break into a rural barn, I am completely ill equipped to outrun a bullet.
    Also not as big a worry in the UK.



  14. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by JER View Post
    Also not as big a worry in the UK.
    you have a much larger country than ours

    so in comparison we are tiny , but have loads of neddies lol

    thivies nearly always attack in the winter months as it dark and cant be seen so easily likewise in summer its early hours

    generally when one yards been hit - then the locals of that area past it on via mouth most are watchful as its deemed here, where i am so many horses and loads of yards within easy reach of each other, over three thousands acres of farmlands
    so one word wil hit the other yards then people within that yard set up more suvalaince not that some yards dont have enough as if a thief want to get in it will regardless of whatever

    but there are tactic one can apply when horses are on there own for whatever reason
    post code your rugs with waterproof paint dont have too do your door no just the post code
    same like wise have all tack identiy marked not only for yards but also at shows
    and dont leave your tack up the if you dont have to

    dont have names on stables doors gives the thief an oppotunity tocall your horse over and nick it

    dont have univited guest on to the yard and dont have all your stuff on display

    most yards have cctv or padlocks or some means of security system some also have watch you horsse at night from home

    some have other ways to prevent the thief but some dont
    not freeze branding or micro chipping or no passport makes easy targets
    not attending you yard on a daily basis at least twice makes an easy target

    feed treats to horses makes an easy target
    bet you didnt think of that one did you----- but it does all one has to do if offer a treat and then they have your horse

    hence why mine dont get treats its not for the genral rule of sweet tip of making horse kick and fight or lunging over the door or nipping the hand or encouraging bad behaviours and rewarding them as such

    its about making it harder for the theif to nick your horse

    as horses that are not fed tip bits over the fenceline or in the feild or at the gate are less likely to be your chummy mate when you go in there as horses tend to revert back to herd instincts which if you know horses are herd animals then this can work to your advantage

    of oik dont know you so not being cuaght turns on his heels and bolts off

    and youre horse and rugs are saved


    everywhere has a % of horse thives and tack robbers and a country that your size and says it doesnt - doubt that very much but like i said you properties are vast and open so morely can see the thief on exit and entry or on the run

    i have been hit twice in 34years and it wasnt my stuuf they was after but the stuff in the lorry park above my fields my yard was a decoy and thing was sotloen just messy as i dont keep anything other than indoor and our door rugs and halters up the yard obviously feed and what nots there
    as for hay straw never been touched

    but ther hardly likely to nick a round bale haha

    and its know that what time of the year thives are more likely to attack
    so ayrds a re more aware a nd often the thhives are cuaght as some manage to get the guys no or vechile detials
    and auctions now have plenty of secuirty and regulations so getting harder for the theif to seel his wares
    but if one mirc o chips and id there stuff then its deterrant so lesslikely to go for it as for trialer and horse boxes and the big stuff
    again mark it on the roof and then on areas with the box at places that are less likely to belooked at with a colored paint or metal id taps which goes in to the metal via letters and no and cannot be removed

    most horseowner know who the theives are within there area but proving it is harder so you make it harder for them not to take your stuff



  15. #35
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    From the description of the wound, my money is still on an accident, even though they didn't find any bloodied branch, etc.

    Reminds me of a necropsy I was involved in where the owner was certain the "Mafia" had killed his dog as a warning. Turned out he was hit by a UPS truck...
    "It's like a Russian nesting doll of train wrecks."--CaitlinandTheBay

    ...just settin' on the Group W bench.



  16. #36
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    When I boarded my horses in Darkest Surrey, we got to the point where we painted their freezebrand #s in housepaint on their blankets in letters a foot high so that they would get stolen off the horses' backs in the field.

    We had locked tack rooms and a large doberman wandering the premises, and we still got hit by tack thieves.

    I think the problem is that it's so easy to load everything onto a boat and be on the European mainland and out of reach of the police in such a short space of time--especially in the Home Counties.

    And that's why all our horses were freezebranded--there was some chance they might not end up on a dinner table if they got stolen.



  17. #37
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    If you read various reports of the incident, they all say that there was no evidence that the horse had been attacked. It appears the heartbroken owner is using this incident to further her ambitions. It's hard to believe that somebody with this record can qualify for the 2012 Olympics.
    Don't forget the Telegraph crosswords.
    Last edited by Equibrit; Sep. 19, 2010 at 10:14 AM.
    ... _. ._ .._. .._



  18. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Equibrit View Post
    If you read various reports of the incident, they all say that there was no evidence that the horse had been attacked. It appears the heartbroken owner is using this incident to further her ambitions. It's hard to believe that somebody with this record can qualify for the 2012 Olympics.
    Don't forget the Telegraph crosswords.
    your so funny equibrit haha sounds like a way to hopefully get regonised haha
    i wonder if thats the crossword puzzle with the telegraph find the anigram haha



  19. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by Equibrit View Post
    It's hard to believe that somebody with this record can qualify for the 2012 Olympics.
    Wow.
    Proud member of the EDRF



  20. #40
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    She's probably going for sympathy sponsorship !
    Website is somewhat unrealistic; http://www.foldsfarmandstud.co.uk/portfolio
    /charlotte_springall_portfolio.pdf

    The horse does have a dressage record - but at elementary in 2010; http://www.britishdressage.co.uk/res...e_record/23567
    Last edited by Equibrit; Sep. 19, 2010 at 06:09 PM.
    ... _. ._ .._. .._



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