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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr. 29, 2006
    Posts
    3,558

    Default Tips please.

    Ride and show 1.15m jumper.
    I open my body angle too early in the air and have had a few rails down down behind because of this. Any tips to keep my hands forward and down and not drop back too early?
    More info/pics needed?
    Any help would be appreciated!



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct. 14, 2007
    Location
    California
    Posts
    3,988

    Default

    I did that too.....

    Trainer is telling me to say down after the jump longer. I keep his voice in my head when jumping... but what has been working for me so far is - I tell myself

    "if I keep my lower leg at the girth I should be able to stay on"...

    And the reason for this is I am also a knee pincher. Which has created an entire string of issues for me and one of them is sitting up too soon, allowing my lower leg to slip back so I sit up because I feel I am going to fall over my horses neck. I have also ridden a lot of hot horses that take off after the jump..... so I sit up out of protection as to not get bucked off.

    Also, keep a short rein.. even if it feels strange.. that has helped me too.... oh and you can't have a short rein property unless your horse is really balanced.
    Train like you have never won and show like you have never lost!!!



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan. 31, 2010
    Location
    Alberta
    Posts
    4,026

    Default

    Is it possible your stirrups are a hole too long?



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug. 16, 2009
    Posts
    665

    Default

    Agree, try shorter stirrups (if your horse jumps hard and round, you're gonna need jockey stirrups). Keep your eyes up and heels down. Some horses sort of throw you back into the saddle on the landing side so it might just be your horse. Wait until your horse's hind end hits the ground before going to sit back down in the tack. Sometimes bounce exercises and poles a stride after the fence help to develop this sort of habit (stay out of the tack until after the pole, etc).

    Video would be helpful.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov. 8, 2006
    Posts
    2,463

    Default

    Try this exercise. I ride a horse in the low ao's that likes to give a "happy buck" after a big effort which made me ride to defensive on the back side of the fence. I needed to learn that I could finish the fence and still be ready for a little play on the back side.

    I worked on this over little fences at the start to get a feel of what I was doing, but where it really clicked is over a nice sized swedish oxer. Every once in a while I repeat the exercise to remember that feeling. It doesn't help that I am very long in the torso (at a correct stirrup length my upper body is longer than my lower body by a lot which makes for a pendulum that can be used for good or bad)

    Exercise:

    Start by putting a stirrup leather around your horses neck. This gives you something to physically feel (by grabbing and first and just feeling later) during the flight phase.

    Flip your reins over so they come into your hand over your index finger instead of coming into your hand over your pinkie. (Classic Anne Kurninski exercise for soft hands)

    Then utilizing an auto release (just while your getting the feeling of really following the horse in all aspects) quietly wrap your pinkie and ring finger around the stirrup leather about half way down the neck. This will give you something to physically and mentally focus on over the fence to remind you of your goal: staying down with the horse.

    Wait a full stride after the fence to let go of the strap while you continue to focus on follow the horse head motion.

    Then when you feel you don't really need the strap to remind you, just feel it with the backs of your fingers instead of grabbing it to check and make sure your position doesn't move.


    The goal isn't to actually use the position you created in the exercise as the one position you use, but rather to increase your awareness of where you are on the horse during all phases of the jump and allow you to make conscious decisions on how you want to adjust your position to influence your horse.


    And when you are doing the exercise, if you are still finding you are still struggling despite the strap, chances are you have your weight to far forward during the take off phase and physics is forcing you back (got to love physics ) before you want to. In that case try the exercise above with out stirrups and make sure you are allowing the horse to lift you out of the saddle by having your weight well distributed between your calf, thighs and seat and NOT on your knee.

    Best of luck; I sympathize with your problem

    Example of how not allowing the horse to lift my weight out of the saddle caused falling behind on the back side. If I had weighted another half a step the horse would have lifted my weight while I closed my hip angle. Instead by throwing my weight up my hip angle closes at the wrong time and momentum makes it very difficult to keep a proper balance past the mid point of the jump.

    Sorry its a hunter vertical at 3'6", its the only course I've had done in frames like that to see the phases of flight. I hope you can learn at my expense (or I think that was at my poor horses expense ) thankfully the problem has been overcome through the above exercise!

    http://community.webshots.com/album/578561450CuXVhS



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr. 29, 2006
    Posts
    3,558

    Default

    Lol! Looking at the pics again, my reins are definitely way too long and my stirrups probably could have been a hole shorter as well. So will do that today as a quick fix.

    I don't usually have this problem at home, so also wonder if it may have been because a LOT of people were having stops at the show and I was cowboying around a bit too much.

    Thanks for the suggestions too, flyracing, definitely some things to work on when I get home! You hit the nail on the head with the pic series!



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb. 22, 2000
    Location
    Keswick, VA
    Posts
    7,871

    Default

    Grab mane. Practice at home grabbing the mane with both hands and staying down while looking up, then practice opening each hand in the air for inside turns while grabbing mane with the other hand. You can train your body to stay over. And plus, you have a jumper. No braids. You can grab mane in the show ring all day long.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr. 29, 2006
    Posts
    3,558

    Default

    Thanks for the tips!

    The first picture is from Saturday where I am opening up way too early.

    http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?pi...7&id=705386256

    The next picture is from a triple combination on Sunday and I am much more "with' my horse.

    http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?pi...7&id=705386256

    The last picture is from the last oxer on course. I was pooped after 17 jumps! My reins got long through the last line but I am still happier with this than my position on Saturday.

    http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?pi...3&id=705386256

    lol! I have no shame grabbing mane.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun. 26, 2000
    Location
    I live in Chantilly, VA but I ride in Anytown, USA
    Posts
    7,563

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by flyracing View Post
    Try this exercise. I ride a horse in the low ao's that likes to give a "happy buck" after a big effort which made me ride to defensive on the back side of the fence. I needed to learn that I could finish the fence and still be ready for a little play on the back side.

    I worked on this over little fences at the start to get a feel of what I was doing, but where it really clicked is over a nice sized swedish oxer. Every once in a while I repeat the exercise to remember that feeling. It doesn't help that I am very long in the torso (at a correct stirrup length my upper body is longer than my lower body by a lot which makes for a pendulum that can be used for good or bad)

    Exercise:

    Start by putting a stirrup leather around your horses neck. This gives you something to physically feel (by grabbing and first and just feeling later) during the flight phase.

    Flip your reins over so they come into your hand over your index finger instead of coming into your hand over your pinkie. (Classic Anne Kurninski exercise for soft hands)

    Then utilizing an auto release (just while your getting the feeling of really following the horse in all aspects) quietly wrap your pinkie and ring finger around the stirrup leather about half way down the neck. This will give you something to physically and mentally focus on over the fence to remind you of your goal: staying down with the horse.

    Wait a full stride after the fence to let go of the strap while you continue to focus on follow the horse head motion.

    Then when you feel you don't really need the strap to remind you, just feel it with the backs of your fingers instead of grabbing it to check and make sure your position doesn't move.


    The goal isn't to actually use the position you created in the exercise as the one position you use, but rather to increase your awareness of where you are on the horse during all phases of the jump and allow you to make conscious decisions on how you want to adjust your position to influence your horse.


    And when you are doing the exercise, if you are still finding you are still struggling despite the strap, chances are you have your weight to far forward during the take off phase and physics is forcing you back (got to love physics ) before you want to. In that case try the exercise above with out stirrups and make sure you are allowing the horse to lift you out of the saddle by having your weight well distributed between your calf, thighs and seat and NOT on your knee.

    Best of luck; I sympathize with your problem

    Example of how not allowing the horse to lift my weight out of the saddle caused falling behind on the back side. If I had weighted another half a step the horse would have lifted my weight while I closed my hip angle. Instead by throwing my weight up my hip angle closes at the wrong time and momentum makes it very difficult to keep a proper balance past the mid point of the jump.

    Sorry its a hunter vertical at 3'6", its the only course I've had done in frames like that to see the phases of flight. I hope you can learn at my expense (or I think that was at my poor horses expense ) thankfully the problem has been overcome through the above exercise!

    http://community.webshots.com/album/578561450CuXVhS
    I like this. I actually have an annoying habit of letting my hands hover over the horse's mane or on the sides of his neck instead of actually resting my hands on his neck. Sounds great if I could properly do an auto-release but I'm not doing that. So, I'm going to try this suggestion. Have pondered trying this before but wasn't sure if my idea would work or not - this makes me think yes!

    "If you have the time, spend it. If you have a hand, lend it. If you have the money, give it. If you have a heart, share it." by me



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