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  1. #1
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    Default MODERATOR PLEASE DELETE THIS THREAD, Thank you

    Thanks again!
    Last edited by BunithGrace; Sep. 10, 2010 at 12:22 PM.



  2. #2
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    Jul. 17, 2009
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    Hoof supplements are working?
    "My biggest fear is that when I die my husband is going to try to sell all my horses and tack for what I told him they cost."



  3. #3
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    Dec. 13, 1999
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    Greensboro, NC
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    Picture?

    "Round" is generally not good in the context of a hoof profile.
    Has it by chance been wet where the horse lives?
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



  4. #4
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    Default

    Thanks!
    Last edited by BunithGrace; Sep. 10, 2010 at 12:22 PM.



  5. #5
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    Default

    Deleted.
    Last edited by BunithGrace; Sep. 10, 2010 at 12:12 PM.



  6. #6
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    Default

    Thanks!
    Last edited by BunithGrace; Sep. 10, 2010 at 12:22 PM.



  7. #7
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    Apr. 7, 2007
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    Looks like the new hoof growth is coming in at a better angle than the old hoof growth. If you added a hoof supplement 2 months ago, that would be about right for that amount of growth. The new growth coming in at a better angle is making the old growth look bulged out.



  8. #8
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    Default

    Thanks!
    Last edited by BunithGrace; Sep. 10, 2010 at 12:23 PM.



  9. #9
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    Ok, this is what I was hoping to see Well, not really, but much better than a "bubble" at the top LOL

    The 2nd picture shows a TERRIBLY hoof form, caused by long-term poor, poor trimming. This isn't about shod or not, not even about the hoof supplement, this is about someone finally doing something to correct the breakover of the toes (and more, but that's the easiest to see).

    However, hmmm, now that I'm thinking about this - is this the same farrier who has been doing this pony all this time? This MAY be about shoes vs not, but not in the way you might be thinking. If barefoot allowed the feet to have toes worn where they *should* be, instead of where the trim and shoes were forcing them to be, that could account for the new, more correct growth.

    The old growth here, if allowed/caused by the current farrier, IMNSHO means the farrier needs to go. Those are long toes, left long for at least a full growth cycle, so 9+ months. Not good.
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



  10. #10
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    Default

    Thanks!
    Last edited by BunithGrace; Sep. 10, 2010 at 12:23 PM.



  11. #11
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    Aug. 8, 2001
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    Not JB, but I've been in your shoes. IMHO, I'd be unhappy with both the trim and the shoeing, the latter more because he's shoeing to fit that godawful trim.

    JB, we've got some rather underrun heels here too, haven't we? Those heels shouldn't be a third of the way under her foot. They need to be brought back a lot, but that will take time.

    OP, unfortunately, you'll want to start learning what a decent trim should look like, and what a good shoeing job (on top of a good trim) looks like. When you feel like you can talk fairly intelligently with your farrier about the issues you're seeing with your pony's trim, you'll want to do that politely. You'll also want to start looking at other farriers' work and having a few new farriers in mind in case that talk doesn't go well.

    I've been where you are now--two years ago, my mare's feet looked bad too. Her toes were ridiculously long, her sole had stretched forward with them, and her heels were way under her foot. She had gone lame, and that was the impetus for me to start learning about feet. I talked with her former farrier and we ended up agreeing to disagree about mare's trim.

    Long story short, I found a new trimmer, got the mare on a diet that met her nutritional needs, and gave her a lot of time off. She came sound and ended up being a much nicer mover than I would have thought.
    Full-time bargain hunter.



  12. #12
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    Dec. 13, 1999
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    Quote Originally Posted by BunithGrace View Post
    Hi JB,

    Thanks for your reply. I read your post about three times and you'll have to forgive me, I'm not very good knowing about feet.
    No forgiveness needed, everyone has to start somewhere

    When we pulled the shoes, her farrier (who has been doing her feet for years now) didn't do anything except a little toe rolling because he didn't want her to be sore.
    That is often the best thing to do. But, it doesn't mean "and then I'll be back in 6-8 weeks for a real trim". It usually means coming back in to weeks or so to assess things and determine what, if anything, can and should be trimmed further

    She went way longer than normally between rounds (she is on a 5 week schedule), and then he put the shoes back on her fronts as I found it was too difficult to keep her boots on and my husband and i really like to ride trails.
    Forgive me if I missed it, but how long since the last trim in the pictures?

    So, you believe the trimming is the problem? Or the shoeing? Or both?
    The trimming at the least. If the shoes were set on as correctly as they could be on an incorrect trim, they will just look bad by the time weeks have gone by and a long foot is even longer, pulling the shoe forward with it.

    Again, I'm sorry but this is like a foreign language to me.
    don't be sorry! You're interested in and trying to learn - THAT is the good part

    Quote Originally Posted by onelanerode View Post
    JB, we've got some rather underrun heels here too, haven't we? Those heels shouldn't be a third of the way under her foot. They need to be brought back a lot, but that will take time.
    Absolutely.

    Heels really tend to follow toes. Toes getting long and forward pull the heels forward, and all that contracts the foot and often thins the sole.

    OP, unfortunately, you'll want to start learning what a decent trim should look like, and what a good shoeing job (on top of a good trim) looks like. When you feel like you can talk fairly intelligently with your farrier about the issues you're seeing with your pony's trim, you'll want to do that politely. You'll also want to start looking at other farriers' work and having a few new farriers in mind in case that talk doesn't go well.
    Yep, what you said

    www.barefoothorse.com is, IMHO, a great place to look at good and bad feet, some befores/afters, with some decent explanations as to what is wrong and what needs to be done to fix it (over time). The picture galleries are great. Don't get sucked into any "shoes are bad" information you read there, because shoes in and of themselves to not make for feet like these
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



  13. #13
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    Default

    Thanks!
    Last edited by BunithGrace; Sep. 10, 2010 at 12:23 PM.



  14. #14
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    Wait, are you saying it had only been a *week* between the trim/shoeing, and this picture?
    http://s826.photobucket.com/albums/z...t=IMG_5716.jpg

    You CAN (and should) start that conversation with your farrier, but IME, if he's allowed and caused this to this point, he most likely doesn't give a darn and can't or won't recognize poor hoof form. That his job, not yours, so if that's the case, talking to him *might* help for a trim or two, but again IME it's likely to be short-lived.

    It's still always a good idea to start a discussion though, so at least you know where he stands.
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



  15. #15
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    Default

    Deleted
    Last edited by BunithGrace; Sep. 10, 2010 at 12:13 PM.



  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by BunithGrace View Post
    JB, I just checked my calendar. It's been 2 weeks.
    My thoughts still stand - no reason for a foot to look like that after 2 weeks

    The farrier is the same since I've owned this pony. She's never been let get this long between trimmings as the last two, and I will take full credit for not having him back to trim her after pulling the shoes.
    Unfortunately, these feet don't look like this due to 1, or, or even 3 overdue trims. This isn't even a matter of looking like this due to being way, way overdue. These feet have been a work in progress for quite a while

    These were her feet last summer:

    http://i826.photobucket.com/albums/z...o/IMG_1003.jpg


    Same farrier.
    Better, but still not acceptable. The shoe is too short, and appears to be set at the end of an already long toe. It's only gotten worse since then.

    I do want to work with him, he would (I think) be open to working on her differently.
    Unfortunately, this isn't about doing something strange, or different, or off the wall, this is all/mostly about just doing it correctly. He has not seen, or cared, that the toes have gotten longer and longer over the last year.

    I just am not sure what my line of conversation should be. Should I begin with asking him if he thinks he would be able to slowly start bringing her toes back?
    I think a very valid starting point would be the difference in new hoof growth you're now seeing. Tell him you noticed that and are wondering why the older growth is so different in angle. His answer will tell you a lot about what he knows, or thinks he knows.

    Are underrun heels and long toes the majority of the issue here?
    Yep, at least from these pictures. There may also be side-to-side imbalances as well, but that's all part of properly trimming.
    Again, thank you sincerely for your help.
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



  17. #17
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    Dec. 28, 2009
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    VA
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    Maybe you could show him the before (last fall pictures) and the now pictures and see what he would suggest. The before picture is a better looking hoof.



  18. #18
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    Sounds like a plan. Thanks guys.



  19. #19
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    Agree with JB. Last summer's picture shows a more correct foot than what the recent pictures show, but it's still not a good trim.

    And I also agree with JB on the "if he knew/cared how to do it right, he'd have done it right from the start" bit. Farriers who know how to do their jobs don't have to be told by owners (who should know less about proper trimming/shoeing than the professionals they're paying), and if he truly doesn't know how to trim correctly, do you want him "practicing" on your pony's feet?

    There are really good farriers out there. Start looking at other horses' feet. When you find ones that look balanced, ask who does them. That will help you find someone. And it's generally better than just asking around, because different people have a different idea of what makes a good trim/shoeing job. (For some people it's how long that shoe stays on ... the longer the better!)

    Good luck.
    Full-time bargain hunter.



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