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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun. 25, 2001
    Posts
    2,545

    Default Learning how to fall

    I'd love access to one of these machines and someone to teach me correct falling form:

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sport/rac...t-falling.html

    The event world needs a few of these.
    "If you can't feed 'em, don't breed 'em."



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr. 13, 2007
    Location
    San Antonio, Texas
    Posts
    182

    Default

    that is surprisingly interesting. obviously it wouldn't ever protect from all eventualities, however even some help and eduction could be helpful. at the least it might help save some collarbones...



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep. 14, 1999
    Posts
    829

    Default

    There's a simpler way. I did aikido when I was a teenager. You spend tons of time on mats getting thrown and learning how to land properly falling. I've fallen lots of times in my riding career, but I usually just tuck and roll.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr. 2, 2010
    Location
    on COTH right now, duh!
    Posts
    512

    Default

    One instructor I had as a kid taught us how to tuck and roll. She took us out in to the woods, made us swear to not tell anyone, and she taught us how to push off our horses and roll (not sure that's the right word I want to use) off, how to tuck and roll once we hit the ground and it was probably the best lesson I ever had because later that show season i had a horse flip over after a jump and even though I do not remember it, I tucked and rolled coming off onto the ground. They said that I had the saddle seat across my thighs and everyone thought I was going to get hurt but I walked away, shaken but ok.

    Where I ride now, the instructors teach the kids how to do a flying dismount just incase, parents watching and all. They need to know how to fall and how to assess a situation where you must dismount so I think it's a good thing to teach.

    I think this machine is great- no substitute for the real thing but I will say that anything that helps you to learn properly can help. I only wish that we had those nice blue mats that day we learned in the woods!



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar. 3, 2010
    Location
    Georgia
    Posts
    1,523

    Default

    Second vote for martial arts. I took jujutsu. It's good to know how to tuck, flip and breakfall.
    "Rock n' roll's not through, yeah, I'm sewing wings on this thing." --Destroyer
    http://dressagescriblog.wordpress.com/



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb. 6, 2003
    Location
    Deep South
    Posts
    14,641

    Default

    You can learn it from a gymnast too.
    ... _. ._ .._. .._



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug. 22, 2007
    Location
    St. Louis
    Posts
    205

    Default

    We had to learn to fall in Pony Club, first from a halt and then walk....

    Super safely taught, and while I've still broken exciting bones in my body as a result from unplanned falls, when I do fall, 99% of the time I use my unconscious PC tuck and roll education. The other 1% of the time gravity/ground hardness wins.

    Not that I fall *that* much!



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov. 23, 2009
    Location
    Lyman, ME
    Posts
    401

    Default

    Pondskating. Fall on your elbow or any other bony part on ice and you will only do it once. You will learn to tuck and roll. :-)



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct. 10, 2009
    Location
    Buffalo, NY
    Posts
    256

    Default

    For some reason I tend to land on my feet, it's happened at all gaits, walk trot canter gallop and when I get a nasty refusal. I almost think I'd be more comfortable actually falling as the twisting involved with landing on your feet can do a number on your core/back.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep. 6, 1999
    Location
    Phoenix, AZ
    Posts
    5,246

    Default

    So, my first foray into really riding was getting dumped off at a stable by my mom. I was to be a slave to them and be a trail guide. Might I add that I was 8!
    Anyway, so it was a western stable with a rent string. Actually it was quite disgusting but what did we know?
    My first lesson was with the owner's kid who was my age. And you know what she first taught me? To fall off. It's a safety thing.
    I wound up learning to somersault off the back and landing on my feet.
    And let me tell you, I need to do it again but learning how to do that and riding shitty ponies bareback has saved my bacon on more than one occasion.
    Try vaulting. Learn how to get on and off that horse.
    My instructor in high school built a barrel on a stand. She affixed a vaulting surcingle on it somehow. And the summer kids learned to vault. I could everything but get on it from the ground. I have no jump!
    And didn't Jimmy used to do lunge lessons with his full time students and they would have to vault on and off?
    This needs to come back. No one knows how to fall off anymore.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun. 25, 2001
    Posts
    2,545

    Default

    When I was young, I was taught the "emergency dismount" where you land on your feet. I won the best emergency dismount in my class.

    Then, when I was 30 or so, my horse was acting up. I was on our property, but we had about 85 acres, and I was alone at the very back. I figured it'd be safe to do an emergency dismount so that I didn't get dumped.

    I performed the perfect dismount, landed on slightly bumpy ground, and both bones in my lower right leg snapped in half! Ugh. Thank goodness I had my cell phone and was living with an ER physician -- he actually saved my leg.

    (Tests showed I have very strong bones -- just an off landing.)

    My new motto is "STAY ON THE HORSE" no matter what. However, if I come off, the last thing I'm going to do is try to land on my feet.

    I'd love to learn to tuck and roll, but no time for martial arts lessons, and I'm too old (and wise) to tuck and roll off my horse onto the hard ground just for the fun of learning. Maybe I'll go to the YMCA and practice on their mats
    "If you can't feed 'em, don't breed 'em."



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jun. 11, 2003
    Posts
    433

    Default

    My first pony, when I was 10, taught me all about falling off. She was smarter than I was, and after about 100 falls courtesy of the smart pony and other stupid things we did 20 plus years ago as kids on ponies, I got lots of practice falling off.
    I truly credit those years for the fairly impressive stickability I now enjoy, and the fact that I am not seriously injured on the rare time I do get unseated. After what should have been a particularly hard landing a year ago, I was told that I rolled very well but it was pure instinct - I didn't have time to think.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Nov. 9, 2005
    Location
    uk
    Posts
    15,268

    Default

    i always teach my students how to fall off in the very 1st few lessons its part of my unauthordox way of riding as i like my pupils to play with the horse and have so some lessons are done via vaulting on and off the ponies, simple exercises frog leaping on rump and on and off sides, then summersaulting from sides and off ot one side so that they instintly go into a rolly polly and tuck ther hands and head in and roll away from the pony, as holding on to the riens is not often an option when you fall off , also by doing this it give you more confidence and trust in the ponies your riding and gives you more confidence in handling yourself in a likely fall



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jan. 10, 2007
    Location
    too far from the barn
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    5,592

    Default

    Judo, gymnastics and a naughty pony as a kid. I had lots and lots of falling experience
    OTTBs rule, but spots are good too!



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jun. 4, 2009
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    673

    Default

    I found that really funny. When I was in high school I declared myself a professional faller because I was slipping and sommmersalting off my (then) new horse a lot trying to jump him. I agree that there is definitely a knack to falling off.

    My favored technique for when you're falling forward, say after an ungraceful fence, or a buck, is to try to wrap my arms around the horse's neck or grab mane and swing to the ground. It keeps me going feet first and sometimes I manage to keep ahold of the horse the entire time. Usually I end up landing on my butt. XD

    I never took any self defense classes, and only beginner level gymnastics as a kid. I never felt like it taught me anything related to falling, tbh. Falling a lot taught me how to fall because I realized it was something that was bound to happen and that I had to be thinking about it as it happened in order to prevent injuries.
    Tru : April 14, 1996 - March 14, 2011
    Thank you for everything boy.


    Better View.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Mar. 7, 2004
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    1,157

    Default

    I think that learning to fall is something that we "older" riders learnt through many activities in our childhood.
    When I was a kid, monkey bars, or those thing with horizontal ladders that you hang from and "walk" across, were high. I remember climbing the ladder and then having to shimmy up the pole to reach the monkey bar. They were also over hard dirt or concrete. I'd get half way across and think that my hands hurt too much to go any further. So I'd look down. The ground was a long way away and it was hard. "Okay, I think that I can go a little way further". And so I'd learn that when I thought I was done, I wasn't yet - there was still more in reserve. I also learnt to fall - off monkey bars and climbing frames and out of trees etc. I learnt to tuck and roll - because otherwise it HURT.
    Now all climbing frames are really close to the ground and have rubber matting around them.
    When kids start riding they can't see the point in trying to stay on - "cos it doesn't hurt when you fall off, there's rubber matting there. OWWW, that hurt. I've got a sore patch. I've never had a sore bit, the ground has never hurt me before."
    30 years ago (shows my age) kids of 6 or 7 who had never had any riding or training in other sports knew how to tuck and roll, bend knees and HANG ON. Now I see kids of 11 & 12 hitting the ground like a full body slam.

    To the OP, ride lots of different horses. Play Pony Club games, practice jumping off as you walk, then trot, then canter. Ride bareback. Falling off does hurt, even if you tuck and roll. Sometimes you will hit a fence or you horse will tuck and roll too. A neuropsych told me once that you need to do someting 10 000 times for it to become unconscious. Wanna fall off 10 000 times?



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Oct. 30, 2004
    Location
    Pine Top side of Atlanta, GA
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    4,961

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bacchus View Post

    (Tests showed I have very strong bones -- just an off landing.)

    My new motto is "STAY ON THE HORSE" no matter what. However, if I come off, the last thing I'm going to do is try to land on my feet.

    hmmmm...I'd also add not landing on your head to the list. If you "stick the landing" you may well break your neck.

    mine too
    ~ it no longer matters what level I do, as long as I am doing it..~ with many thanks, to Elizabeth Callahan



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Apr. 13, 2006
    Posts
    921

    Default

    IMO more realistic than the front end collapsing model.

    Also he is LATERAL tuck and rolling, NOT straight over the top (which is what a gymnast would do.

    My only concern with some styles of martial arts is the slapping of the floor....It increases the forearm load, increasing the risk of forearm fracture.

    Keeps his hands up.....

    Good technique...good tool.

    Regards,
    Medical Mike



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Apr. 11, 2001
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    6,535

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bacchus View Post
    My new motto is "STAY ON THE HORSE" no matter what.
    For the last couple of days I've seen the title of this thread and chuckled. Hell, I've spent 40 years trying to learn how to stay on a horse and now I'm hearing I was suppose to learn how to fall off!? :wink:


    1 members found this post helpful.

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Oct. 30, 2004
    Location
    Pine Top side of Atlanta, GA
    Posts
    4,961

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by subk View Post
    For the last couple of days I've seen the title of this thread and chuckled. Hell, I've spent 40 years trying to learn how to stay on a horse and now I'm hearing I was suppose to learn how to fall off!? :wink:
    Are you making the trip to Chatt Hills to see what's in your future? Do hope so!!! sorry to momentarily detour the thread...most sorry
    ~ it no longer matters what level I do, as long as I am doing it..~ with many thanks, to Elizabeth Callahan



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