The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 24
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr. 2, 2010
    Location
    Wellington/Ft.Lauderdale, FL
    Posts
    392

    Default How is a Stallion Approved?

    So I am new into the world of Warmbloods, and I am not quite sure how a stallion is actually approved for breeding.
    So just for example, I had my colt approved GOV last month, and although he was not named a stallion prospect because his dam was a inch too short(he did get foal of distiction!), we were told that if she produced another foal just as nice as him, she would be moved up into the main mare book, and my colt would therefore be able to participate in stallion approval(if I choose, which I highly doubt).
    So say I did choose to keep him as a stallion,(which I most likely wont!) what do I do?
    I know there is the inital stallion inspection, and once he gets through that then you can either send him off to the 70 day test(which I know is super exspensive) or he gets high enough scores throughout his performance career?
    I see so many approved stallions, have they all gone to the stallion testing? Or are they just initially approved and never go on to the 70 day test? Or are the performance records enough to get them in the books?
    Thanks for reading and replying!!



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar. 17, 2003
    Location
    North Texas, US
    Posts
    2,156

    Default

    Each registry is a bit different, but in general:

    For young stallions-
    Initial inspection at 3 or older. If approved, then some will give a limited license good for x number of breedings or for y number of years until other requirements are met.

    Some require the 30 day test for all stallions and then either the 70 day (either 6 mos or 1 yr later, depending on the time of year of the 30 day) OR the "performance route."

    If the stallion successfully completes the 30 and 70 with scores that meet that registry's requirements, then he receives his permanent license. However, some registry's reserve the right to revoke the license if they don't like what he produces over a certain number of years.

    If you don't go the 70 day route, then each registry has their own performance requirements for each discipline which can be found on that registry's website. Generally, with a young stallion, you have 2-3 yrs to fulfill the requirements or they lose their license.

    Yes, every stallion currently approved by one of the major registries (not AWS, AWR) either has already or is in the process of fulfilling those requirements.

    Yes, the 30 day/70 day option is expensive. Depending on where you live (and thus the traveling expenses involved), probably in the neighborhood of 20k. However, the performance route is not an easy one. There are training, showing expenses and if, God forbid, your boy sustains a career-ending injury, then you're out of luck and now you don't even have an approved stallion.

    Another consideration is that standing a stallion in North America is not for the faint of heart. It is very difficult and many of those stallions you see on the stallion rosters get NO MARES. I think the average number of mares is under 5 and you have to take into account that there are a few getting over 100, so that skews things a bit. There are also a lot of liability issues.

    I adore my boy and enjoy standing him, but had I known in 2002 when he was given to my husband and I as a wedding present what I know NOW, not sure I would have done it. I'm very lucky because he is very special and a blast to be around.
    www.debracysporthorses.com
    Home of Sea Accounts xx
    AHS/HV, ATA, GOV, RPSI, JC, AQHA, APHA, APtHA
    "LIKE" www.facebook.com/SeaAccounts



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan. 21, 2003
    Location
    Charles Town, WV
    Posts
    6,637

    Default

    So just for example, I had my colt approved GOV last month
    Sam, if this is a colt, i.e. still with his dam, then he was registered with your registry. He cannot be approved for breeding until he is at least 3 years old, and first he has to be registered, which is what you just did.
    Tranquility Farm - Proud breeder of Born in the USA Sport Horses, and Cob-sized Warmbloods
    Now apparently completely invisible!



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar. 20, 2010
    Location
    Bucks County, PA
    Posts
    1,696

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tiki View Post
    Sam, if this is a colt, i.e. still with his dam, then he was registered with your registry. He cannot be approved for breeding until he is at least 3 years old, and first he has to be registered, which is what you just did.
    I agree that this was a foal inspection, not a stallion approval. I just wanted to clarify that you can present a 2 year old colt to both ISR/Old NA and GOV for stallion approval, as Hilltop just did (with Old NA) with Qredit.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr. 2, 2010
    Location
    Wellington/Ft.Lauderdale, FL
    Posts
    392

    Default

    cyriz's mom- Thank you so much for that information! So the resulting foals from a stallion that has a limited license would be eligable to be registered then?
    Just wondering if I wanted to keep my colt intact for a few years and then geld him to get a couple foals for my own personal use

    Tiki- Thanks for the clarification!!

    Callaway- Thanks for that info!!



  6. #6
    Join Date
    May. 4, 2010
    Posts
    626

    Default

    Depends on the registry you use, but yes, with most provisional liscenses, the foals are eligible for registration and such, same as using a "fully approved/liscensed" stallion. But, the liscense could be taken away and no future foals then are eligible.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun. 16, 2006
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    128

    Default PRE Approval

    Quote Originally Posted by Callaway View Post
    I agree that this was a foal inspection, not a stallion approval. I just wanted to clarify that you can present a 2 year old colt to both ISR/Old NA and GOV for stallion approval, as Hilltop just did (with Old NA) with Qredit.
    I havent followed the inspections this year, but what I am reading here is that this colt was presented for an 'unofficial' inspection as a 2 year old. ISR/OLD offers that to stallion owners to get a view of what lies ahead...to geld ot not to geld...
    The official inspections dp not take place until the stallion is at least three...
    We are in the process of doing just that with our two year old colt by Scimitar, out of a Pointmaker mare. It will give us some direction with him for his next year. Wish us luck! We are aware of the financial issues and ready to get on with it!



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug. 28, 2004
    Location
    British Columbia
    Posts
    847

    Default Foals from Stallion

    I am not familiar with all registries, but, the one my horses are registered with is CWHBA. My stallion is registered and not approved or licensed, however, his offspring CAN be registered in an auxiliary book and for a higher fee than a foal being registered by a licensed stallion.

    If you want a few foals by your colt/future stallion, as you say, you can do that and have papers for them in this way, if the registry of your choice has similar rules. Papers are papers, everyone wants a registered horse, but not everyone wants to breed them; buyers want an athletic horse suited to their discipline and sometimes they need to be registered to be eligible for upper level competition. Buyers have no clue which "book" per se their horse is registered in. All they care about is that they are registered. In this way you can have registered foals by your unlicensed stallion. It also benefits the registry by bringing in registration fees to the registry, even though your stallion is unlicensed.

    CWHBA will inspect a two year old colt, but I would not pay the inspection fee for a horse that young.
    Dark Horse Farm



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug. 7, 2010
    Location
    Alberta Canada
    Posts
    133

    Default

    Springlake1 is correct, (at least with OLD)
    you can present your 2 y/o and get their opinion on him as a 'potential' breeding stallion.. it doesn't mean he is approved.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar. 20, 2010
    Location
    Bucks County, PA
    Posts
    1,696

    Default

    I'm quite positive that a 2 year old can be presented for approval with the Oldenburg registries, as Qredit just received his certified breeding license with Old NA. He is a 2 year old.

    http://www.facebook.com/#!/profile.php?id=695632346

    Springlake and Ssporthorses that is the case with AHS--they will not approve a stallion until they are 3. They only do preliminary evaluations for 2 year old colts. This is not however the case with Oldenburg.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Nov. 18, 2009
    Location
    Columbia, SC
    Posts
    315

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Springlake1 View Post
    I havent followed the inspections this year, but what I am reading here is that this colt was presented for an 'unofficial' inspection as a 2 year old. ISR/OLD offers that to stallion owners to get a view of what lies ahead...to geld ot not to geld...
    The official inspections dp not take place until the stallion is at least three...
    We are in the process of doing just that with our two year old colt by Scimitar, out of a Pointmaker mare. It will give us some direction with him for his next year. Wish us luck! We are aware of the financial issues and ready to get on with it!
    Qredit is "APPROVED" ISR/Old. This is what I got from Natalie:

    "We did end up presenting Qredit at yesterday’s ISR/Oldenburg inspection and I am thrilled to say that he now has a Certified Breeding License through them and will be able to breed 20 mares next year! He was the high-scoring stallion of the day as well with 225 points overall; including 8.5 on both his walk and trot."

    He of course still needs to do his testing or accomplish the performance requirements for his lifetime approval. He's very mature looking for a two year old and I can tell you I'm super excited to breed to him in the coming years. He was going to be presented to the German Oldenburg this year but was in a growth spurt and they decided against it. So yes, 2 year olds are allowed to be presented for approval for their Breeding License and not just to get opinion for potential approvals.
    Grassfield Sport Horses, LLC

    Follow us on facebook!!!



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Nov. 5, 2000
    Posts
    9,449

    Default

    OP - is this your UB40/Arabian colt?

    I am sure this comment will cause an uproar with the Arabian fans, but you will find that some registries are reluctant to approve a stallion with so much Arabian blood, esp. if the Arabian sires in the pedigree do not have a sport horse performance record, and doubly so if the Arabian bloodlines are not sport horse performance type (i.e., they are Egyptian Arabians, park horse types, etc.). This is because that blood can breed so true the registries are afraid the non-sport horse qualities will be strongly passed on. Some of what they are concerned about are level croups, straight-ish hindquarters, narrow fronts, lack of elasticity through the topline, tendency to go inverted and avoid coming "through", tendency to travel with their hocks out behind them or be too "up and down" with the hindleg, lack of ability to "sit", and lack of general sport horse type athleticism, particularly in jumping ability.

    Yes, there are certainly some Arabians out there with good sport horse qualities, but in general, Arabians have not been bred for SH traits, so their genes are loaded with "non sport horse" traits.

    Just something to think about as you contemplate keeping your colt intact with an eye to future licensing.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Mar. 20, 2010
    Location
    Bucks County, PA
    Posts
    1,696

    Default

    There was a super cute 3 year old colt at Hilltop's ISR/Old NA inspection who just received a certified breeding license. Saint Sandro is by Stendinger out of an Arab mare. This was the first Arab/WB stallion that I have seen get approved. I thought he was so cool!



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Nov. 5, 2000
    Posts
    9,449

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Callaway View Post
    There was a super cute 3 year old colt at Hilltop's ISR/Old NA inspection who just received a certified breeding license. Saint Sandro is by Stendinger out of an Arab mare. This was the first Arab/WB stallion that I have seen get approved. I thought he was so cool!
    Yes, he is a cute little bugger! But - according to someone who was there - his performance in the jump chute illustrates the point I was making above.

    Some will say, "No matter, he is going to be a dressage horse", but based on what I was told, I would have concerns about him successfully passing the jumping portion of a SPT.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Mar. 20, 2010
    Location
    Bucks County, PA
    Posts
    1,696

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DownYonder View Post
    Yes, he is a cute little bugger! But - according to someone who was there - his performance in the jump chute illustrates the point I was making above.

    Some will say, "No matter, he is going to be a dressage horse", but based on what I was told, I would have concerns about him successfully passing the jumping portion of a SPT.
    Actually, he had high scores through the chute. I remember him getting at least an '8' for scope.

    I will agree with your above comments in general, though.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Apr. 2, 2010
    Location
    Wellington/Ft.Lauderdale, FL
    Posts
    392

    Default

    DownYonder- Yes...this is about my UB40/Arabian colt! Good memory! I know that arabians are frowned upon in the sport horse world(which is the whole reason I wanted to find the perfect Arabian mare to cross with a Warmblood since I live in Wellington and would love to show there one day, but would never take a purebred in front of those European judges, yet I still love the Arabian Show Circuit!) so I would not expect him to be approved for breeding, it is just a little fantasy of mine to get MAYBE one or two babies out of him for me and a friend of mine who is rather interested in the Arabian/Warmblood cross as well. So he would be for my private use only!!

    Fortunetly, the mare I picked is a fantasic sport horse type, and they absolutely loved her at the GOV inspection, as well as her purebred daughter! So I think my boy turned out even better then expected( but of course I am biased).

    But who knows, he is getting shipped down to me in Florida next month, and he may feel a little too much testosterone...so those bad boys might come off ASAP!

    Thank you so much for all the wonderful responses, this is the most informative place on the web for horse information, and I really appreciate everyone taking out time to reply!



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jun. 23, 2004
    Location
    Loudoun County, VA
    Posts
    10,423

    Default

    Well personally I would not put much stock in a registry that depends on the views of one person to determine what is and is not a stallion prospect. No matter how fabulous and expert that one person might be, ultimately it is only the view of one person.

    Also, even GOV must think there is some value in certain Arab lines or else they would not approve Arabians for breeding. My friend's arab mare was approved GOV and her foal by Rascalino was premium last year. How can that be if Arabians suck?



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Nov. 5, 2000
    Posts
    9,449

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Callaway View Post
    Actually, he had high scores through the chute. I remember him getting at least an '8' for scope.

    I will agree with your above comments in general, though.
    Really? The person I talked to has a jumper background, and she thought his scores were quite generous. I will have to hunt up the You Tube video.



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Nov. 5, 2000
    Posts
    9,449

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by YankeeLawyer View Post
    Also, even GOV must think there is some value in certain Arab lines or else they would not approve Arabians for breeding. My friend's arab mare was approved GOV and her foal by Rascalino was premium last year. How can that be if Arabians suck?
    Re-read my post.

    some registries are reluctant to approve a stallion with so much Arabian blood, esp. if the Arabian sires in the pedigree do not have a sport horse performance record, and doubly so if the Arabian bloodlines are not sport horse performance type (i.e., they are Egyptian Arabians, park horse types, etc.).
    Surely you understand the difference between approving a mare and approving a stallion.

    And I never said "Arabians suck". Heck, my own broodmare was a Han-Arab, and I still own and ride her daughter. I have a lot of appreciation for many of her Arabian traits.
    Last edited by DownYonder; Sep. 3, 2010 at 12:39 PM.



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Mar. 20, 2010
    Location
    Bucks County, PA
    Posts
    1,696

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DownYonder View Post
    Really? The person I talked to has a jumper background, and she thought his scores were quite generous. I will have to hunt up the You Tube video.
    I'm not sure if his scores were generous. I wasn't paying attention while he was jumping (I was chatting with a friend ), I just heard the scores.



Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 12
    Last Post: Aug. 23, 2012, 07:22 PM
  2. DeNiro and his approved stallion sons..
    By back in the saddle in forum Sport Horse Breeding
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: Dec. 12, 2011, 09:53 PM
  3. Recently Gelder-approved DHH stallion?
    By JB in forum Sport Horse Breeding
    Replies: 22
    Last Post: Jan. 29, 2011, 02:04 PM
  4. GOV approved stallion for this mare
    By Forte in forum Sport Horse Breeding
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: Nov. 6, 2010, 12:22 PM
  5. First stallion approved with the new BWP Hunter Label
    By sfstable in forum Sport Horse Breeding
    Replies: 18
    Last Post: Jul. 29, 2009, 06:11 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •