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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May. 8, 2004
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    PA
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    Default Knitters: Share it!

    I can't post photos, but I finished my first Baby Surprise Jacket this summer. I am so very chuffed.

    I tried knitting one a few months back and wasn't happy with it at all; ratty looking increases, too loose gauge, blah, blah. Typically knitterly woes.

    But I tried again to make one for a friend (who is having a surprise baby, so what more appropriate gift could I give her?? ) and it turned out grand! Here's a link to Rav if you are a member (and if you have knitted a BSJ or are planning to, check out the nifty "chain" increases - looks way nicer than the plain old increases ):

    Reynard Ridge's Surprise Baby Baby Surprise Jacket

    Oh, hail Elizabeth Zimmerman! The George Morris of the Knitting World.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov. 15, 2005
    Location
    Eastern Shore, MD
    Posts
    1,354

    Default

    Congrats! My LYS is doing a BSJ knit a long and it looks pretty cool - but I don't know of any babies to make one for!

    I have a major problem with/addiction to hand painted yarns, so I've pretty well become a dedicated sock knitter... though I don't generally get too fancy with the patterns - I like letting the yarn do all the work!

    I've also got a good sized afghan on the needles (but it's hibernating at the moment - it's just too hot to work on), and I really like making hats (but having only one head, there are only so many hats I can use...)

    One of these days, I'm going to get brave and try a sweater or shell or something - I've got a few patterns stashed that look doable.

    And I LOFF EZ as the GM of knitting - that's awesome! Totally going to Rav now to check out your BSJ! (I'm bdj over there, too)



  3. #3
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    May. 8, 2004
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    PA
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    Default

    If you can knit socks and hats, a sweater is easier than eating a chocolate chip muffin.

    I'd recommend finding a standard top down raglan (no seaming!!) and just start knitting. I get the hand painted yarn sock obsession, and they certainly take less time than a sweater, but I am all about making sure you have options, and finished up a nice hand knitted sweater is such a win!

    The BSJ was terribly fun, because who can resist the challenge of EZ, but I do think the child and adult versions are not really suitable for actual human wearing (), so think the BSJ should be limited to the wee ones. I'd *love* to knit one again, but I'll have to wait until someone else is ready to pop out a new baby.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep. 24, 2009
    Posts
    1,290

    Default

    I don't knit, but I crochet, does that count ? LOL.

    I SWEAR I get asked to baby showers because I always make a cute lil baby blanket... I love doing them, and they do go quickly !



  5. #5
    Join Date
    May. 8, 2004
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    PA
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Roxyllsk View Post
    I don't knit, but I crochet, does that count ? LOL.

    I SWEAR I get asked to baby showers because I always make a cute lil baby blanket... I love doing them, and they do go quickly !
    Sharing means photos! Are you a Ravelry member? Huge database of crochet patterns.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar. 9, 2001
    Posts
    1,330

    Default

    I told my friend (who is a big knitter) that she should make these for everybody for Christmas.


    http://evrd.net/post/5048/



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun. 9, 2009
    Location
    The Frozen Tundra
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    671

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Leather View Post
    I told my friend (who is a big knitter) that she should make these for everybody for Christmas.


    http://evrd.net/post/5048/


    I love them!

    In all seriousness, I can knit socks (they take me forever, but I can do it), and every time I have tried to knit a sweater, it turns into an epic fail. How do you do it?
    ~~Member of the TB's Rule Clique ~~



  8. #8
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    May. 8, 2004
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    PA
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Twigster View Post


    I love them!

    In all seriousness, I can knit socks (they take me forever, but I can do it), and every time I have tried to knit a sweater, it turns into an epic fail. How do you do it?
    Are you knitting a bunch of pieces and seaming them together? I have always found that a great way to make a crappy sweater. Of course, people do it all the time, but those are better people then me.

    To knit a sweater, I figure out how many inches the neck needs to be, knit a tension patch and work out the number of stitches for the neck.

    Let's say, 16 inch neck at 8 stitches per inch = 128 stitches. I cast on 128 stitches onto a circular needle.

    The you separate front, back and two sleeves. To do so: divide 128 by 6, which gives you 21. You need 21 stitches for each "sleeve" and twice 21 for the front and twice 21 for the back.

    So place a marker so you have 42 in front, 42 in back, and 22 on each side (six doesn't go into 128 evenly).

    Begin knitting in the round. Every OTHER row, do a knit through the front and back increase before and after each stitch marker. You are increasing front, back and sleeves at the same time.

    Try on periodically. When the back and front are the same size as your back and front, stop increasing. At the point where the sleeve wraps around the top of your arm and meets comfortably, you need to put the sleeves on new needles to hold, and join the body. Join the body, knit (until just before forever), trying on periodically to make sure it fits. Decrease as you wish for fitting around waist. Many sweaters don't, depends on your waist and how snug you want sweater to fit. When long enough, decide how you want to finish it. I like either ribbing for a few rows or I frequently use purl three rows for a nice easy, none curling finish.

    Go back to sleeves. Start knitting in the round. Try on periodically, and decrease as you move to elbow for fit (how often depends on row guage). Knit until sleeve fits, and finish, generally the same finish as the body.

    Repeat for second sleeve.

    Pick up stitches around neck and finish in similar way to sleeves; again I like ribbing OR the three purl rows.

    Voila. Finished sweater. No fuss, no muss.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep. 13, 2008
    Location
    Vermont
    Posts
    795

    Default

    My aunt taught me to knit when I was five. Of course I just made little squares for a while. But I can knit anything now days. I mostly make sweaters for the grandkids and socks for me. I have a lot of hunters who like to buy the big heavy socks too. Here is a couple things I made recently.
    http://i129.photobucket.com/albums/p...s/IMGP1325.jpg

    http://i129.photobucket.com/albums/p.../crafts001.jpg

    http://i129.photobucket.com/albums/p...s/july3023.jpg

    http://i129.photobucket.com/albums/p...erFeb08001.jpg



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep. 13, 2008
    Location
    Vermont
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    795

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Reynard Ridge View Post
    Are you knitting a bunch of pieces and seaming them together? I have always found that a great way to make a crappy sweater. Of course, people do it all the time, but those are better people then me.

    To knit a sweater, I figure out how many inches the neck needs to be, knit a tension patch and work out the number of stitches for the neck.

    Let's say, 16 inch neck at 8 stitches per inch = 128 stitches. I cast on 128 stitches onto a circular needle.

    The you separate front, back and two sleeves. To do so: divide 128 by 6, which gives you 21. You need 21 stitches for each "sleeve" and twice 21 for the front and twice 21 for the back.

    So place a marker so you have 42 in front, 42 in back, and 22 on each side (six doesn't go into 128 evenly).

    Begin knitting in the round. Every OTHER row, do a knit through the front and back increase before and after each stitch marker. You are increasing front, back and sleeves at the same time.

    Try on periodically. When the back and front are the same size as your back and front, stop increasing. At the point where the sleeve wraps around the top of your arm and meets comfortably, you need to put the sleeves on new needles to hold, and join the body. Join the body, knit (until just before forever), trying on periodically to make sure it fits. Decrease as you wish for fitting around waist. Many sweaters don't, depends on your waist and how snug you want sweater to fit. When long enough, decide how you want to finish it. I like either ribbing for a few rows or I frequently use purl three rows for a nice easy, none curling finish.

    Go back to sleeves. Start knitting in the round. Try on periodically, and decrease as you move to elbow for fit (how often depends on row guage). Knit until sleeve fits, and finish, generally the same finish as the body.

    Repeat for second sleeve.

    Pick up stitches around neck and finish in similar way to sleeves; again I like ribbing OR the three purl rows.

    Voila. Finished sweater. No fuss, no muss.
    Oh, my how I envy you. I used to be able to figure out that kind of thing and make patterns but after an accident in 98 I had to learn to knit over and that figuring out things part did not come back. I wish it would but I seem to have a block or something in that part of the brain now.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar. 9, 2006
    Location
    OHIO!
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    1,717

    Default

    Holy Cow!

    COTHers have mad skills!

    I can knit scarves. End of story.
    flogarty
    "It is difficult not to be unjust to what one loves" Oscar Wilde



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Aug. 12, 2001
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    Trailer Trash Ammy!
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    Default

    I'm not a regular knitter, but decades ago when I was in college, I fell in absolute LOFF with a sweater I saw on the cover of a French magazine at a newsstand. Upon closer inspection, it was a French KNITTING magazine.

    Not one to let a mere language barrier and the fact I'd never successfully knitted ANYTHING stop me from having THAT VERY sweater, I decided to take the project on. Had to tear it apart about 3 times, but I finally made it. And ever since, when one wears out, I just make another one. There's an inch-wide band of tricky stitching around the yoke that I usually have to redo 3 or 4 times every time I knit it, but the rest is just knit-purl stuff and it's really pretty easy.

    It's the only knitting I do! And 40 years down the road I'm STILL not tired of the pattern, because it's so unique - never seen another one like it.
    "The standard you walk by is the standard you accept."--Lt. Gen. David Morrison, Austalian Army Chief



  13. #13
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    May. 8, 2004
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    Default

    WA, that's just odd.

    I'd like to see the pattern. Do you have the name, designer, etc? I can probably find it on Ravelry if you can give me a little info and a description.



  14. #14
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    Aug. 12, 2001
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    Default

    Haha yeah I know - it's b/c I don't really ENJOY knitting, I just regard it as a means to an end.

    Sweater is not on Ravelry. The closest thing on there is kind of like this, only that's a baby sweater - and mine has a turtleneck. So, if you can imagine the baby sweater, biggie-sized, with heavier yarn, a 1.5" decorative band at the bottom of the yoke, and a turtleneck, you're sort of there. The principle of knitting it is the same - the yoke is done on a round, but starts with bands that are 1" wide and get narrower as you go up.

    Oddly enough I can't even find the sweater at the moment to take a picture of... it's buried somewhere in the winter clothes in the spare room. Sorry.
    "The standard you walk by is the standard you accept."--Lt. Gen. David Morrison, Austalian Army Chief



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Dec. 6, 2000
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    SE Mass
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    4,450

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by War Admiral View Post
    I'm not a regular knitter, but decades ago when I was in college, I fell in absolute LOFF with a sweater I saw on the cover of a French magazine at a newsstand. Upon closer inspection, it was a French KNITTING magazine.

    Not one to let a mere language barrier and the fact I'd never successfully knitted ANYTHING stop me from having THAT VERY sweater, I decided to take the project on. Had to tear it apart about 3 times, but I finally made it. And ever since, when one wears out, I just make another one. There's an inch-wide band of tricky stitching around the yoke that I usually have to redo 3 or 4 times every time I knit it, but the rest is just knit-purl stuff and it's really pretty easy.

    It's the only knitting I do! And 40 years down the road I'm STILL not tired of the pattern, because it's so unique - never seen another one like it.
    Now that sweater I want to see a picture of.



  16. #16
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    Dec. 6, 2000
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    Default

    OK, so I have been working on the same sweater for nearly a decade. In the days when we had a TV, I knit a lot, but now, no TV, no knitting.

    I recently picked up the sweater again, and I am onto the sleeves. Unfortunately, they call for using double pointed needles on the end. Can anyone point me to directions on how the hell you use double pointed needles?



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jan. 24, 2008
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    1,619

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by IFG View Post
    OK, so I have been working on the same sweater for nearly a decade. In the days when we had a TV, I knit a lot, but now, no TV, no knitting.

    I recently picked up the sweater again, and I am onto the sleeves. Unfortunately, they call for using double pointed needles on the end. Can anyone point me to directions on how the hell you use double pointed needles?
    IFG-they usually come in sets of 5-divide your work evenly among 4 of the needles, and knit with the 5th. As you work from left to right, you will soon have a new empty needle. Use that needle and just keep going-you'll understand as you do it. Like lots of knitting, it's easier to do than to read the directions!



  18. #18
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    Dec. 6, 2000
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by lesson junkie View Post
    IFG-they usually come in sets of 5-divide your work evenly among 4 of the needles, and knit with the 5th. As you work from left to right, you will soon have a new empty needle. Use that needle and just keep going-you'll understand as you do it. Like lots of knitting, it's easier to do than to read the directions!
    OK, after an initial panic attack, I think that it makes sense. So it is like a round needle only for areas of smaller diameter?



  19. #19
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    Jan. 24, 2008
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by IFG View Post
    OK, after an initial panic attack, I think that it makes sense. So it is like a round needle only for areas of smaller diameter?
    Exactly.



  20. #20
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    Dec. 6, 2000
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by lesson junkie View Post
    Exactly.
    Thanks much!



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