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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov. 25, 2008
    Location
    Stuttgart, Germany
    Posts
    558

    Default Words of Encouragement RE: Saving for a Dressage Prospect!

    I moved to Germany 6 months ago and it seems my dressage horse in the States is never going to sell (He would not like it here so that is the reason for selling...)! So... I've started saving as much money as I can every month so I can buy a horse here. I'm about 1/3 of the way to my goal to *begin* the horse hunt! I need words of encouragement... Saving money is REALLY, REALLY hard!



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb. 26, 2008
    Posts
    754

    Default

    You can do it!!!! Just think this xxx will pay for the pretty little ears, this little xxx will go towards nice big hooves, this xxxx will get me a horsie with a biggest sweetest heart, and this xxxxx will go towards that canter I always dreamed of...

    Stick with it, you know horses are a must in life



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep. 21, 2007
    Location
    SF Bay Area
    Posts
    1,089

    Default

    Do you have a 401k?
    "Reite dein Pferd vorwärts und richte es gerade.” Gustav Steinbrecht



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan. 30, 2010
    Location
    Alberta
    Posts
    3,523

    Default

    Can the bank just suck a portion of your pay cheque out into a savings account each month? It will be like you never had the money in the first place. Perhaps the same amount as you would be paying in horsey expenses once you have the horse.

    It will add up faster than you know it!



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct. 3, 2002
    Location
    it's not the edge of the earth, but you can see it from here
    Posts
    12,079

    Default

    Stick to your current plan.

    Do NOT use credit or a loan to buy a LIVE creature that can a) die, b) go lame or c) fail import requiremnts...

    Seriously. I know it is hard. *I* KNOW it is HARD. I need a saddle. Desperately. I have a 3yo and a just-turned-4yo who need starting, but do not have a saddle to fit them. HOWEVER, I will NOT go into debt over horses. I adore them. I could sooner stop breathing than stop being around them. BUT, I am *so much better off* in this crap economy than those with unreasonable debt.

    I speak from experience. I had to decide whether to drop out of school with a mere ONE semester to go to get my BA, or use credit. I chose to use credit. I learned my lesson.

    Now, I save. If I cannot make private payment arrangements (lease-to-own), I save. And pay cash when I have saved *enough.*

    It sucks.

    And sometimes, the thing I thought I desperatelywantedneededNOW... ends up not being as right a fit for me as the thing that is there when I have the resources.

    But... I don't have TV, I have the cheapest internet I could find because internet IS my one vice. I don't eat out. I don't got out (what do you have to show for it the next morning?) I shop discount and surplus and used... etc. I make CHOICES.

    And I am just as poor as I was when the recession hit. No more, no less. Well, WEG isn't helping uhoh: )

    You can do it. Keep saving. Every once in a blue moon, be kind to yourself and spend just a *wee* bit on something special. But, TRULY look at what you want and what you NEED, and make do.

    You will be FAR better off in the long run.
    InnisFailte Pinto Sporthorses & Coloured Cobs
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    Bits are like cats, what's one more? (Petstorejunkie)



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov. 25, 2008
    Location
    Stuttgart, Germany
    Posts
    558

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by InsideLeg2OutsideRein View Post
    Do you have a 401k?
    Hahaha um yes and no I'm still young, 26, so haven't had one for long and when I had to quit my job to move to Germany Fidelity sent me a message that I had to either roll over my $$ contributed or do something with it. Well my new job isn't anything I plan on keeping (I work with 40 screaming school age children!!!!!!!) so I didn't really want to roll it over (and I don't remember all of their fine print on my money...) so I took it out All whopping $1300 of it. Hahaha

    Anyway; I'm 1/3 of the way to my goal to *begin* shopping for a horse. I'm saving about 85% of my income because my husband is making enough right now so I'm only responsible for insurance. We have a deal that if I save now for a horse so that I can have time to educate the horse before we move back home that when my horse in the States sells then I will use some of that money to help pay off my husband's sports car that he bought. (And use the rest for shipping of my new horsie ). So, if the trend continues I'll be able to start shopping in February or so. That's not too far.... right???

    Oh, and to soothe the horse addiction in the interim I test rode a horse for part lease and will test ride one more time before committing. He's a big ole Westphalian that is trained to Intermediare and is at a barn where I have a friend/grand prix rider that I can take lessons from. Yay!



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun. 7, 2006
    Posts
    8,560

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by n2dressage View Post
    Hahaha um yes and no I'm still young, 26, so haven't had one for long and when I had to quit my job to move to Germany Fidelity sent me a message that I had to either roll over my $$ contributed or do something with it. Well my new job isn't anything I plan on keeping (I work with 40 screaming school age children!!!!!!!) so I didn't really want to roll it over (and I don't remember all of their fine print on my money...) so I took it out All whopping $1300 of it. Hahaha

    Anyway; I'm 1/3 of the way to my goal to *begin* shopping for a horse. I'm saving about 85% of my income because my husband is making enough right now so I'm only responsible for insurance. We have a deal that if I save now for a horse so that I can have time to educate the horse before we move back home that when my horse in the States sells then I will use some of that money to help pay off my husband's sports car that he bought. (And use the rest for shipping of my new horsie ). So, if the trend continues I'll be able to start shopping in February or so. That's not too far.... right???

    Oh, and to soothe the horse addiction in the interim I test rode a horse for part lease and will test ride one more time before committing. He's a big ole Westphalian that is trained to Intermediare and is at a barn where I have a friend/grand prix rider that I can take lessons from. Yay!
    No matter what you are doing or saving for, a wise plan is to set aside at least 25% of your money for retirement and emergency savings. Independent of rent, other expenses, or "fun." The normal ratio is 25% each, but since your husband is paying for most of it you have a little more room.

    I would not save for a horse at the expense of saving for yourself.

    Having lived in Germany I can tell you it is SO EASY to find quality lessons on quality school horses for 20 euros a ride.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr. 15, 2008
    Posts
    1,391

    Default

    Keep saving and don't settle. It can take a long time to find the "right" horse. Because I didn't settle in my quest, but kept saving I had the money when Mr. Right came along and it was almost twice my original target price.

    The only horse I bought "on credit", it was actually a home equity loan, went lame after 2 years and I'm still feeding him.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug. 11, 2008
    Location
    Central Texas
    Posts
    375

    Default

    It IS hard to save ... I am working on saving money just so I can go to shows when I am ready. For now, most of that money is going in to lessons, though.
    There's an expression I love: "Save pennies, spend dollars." Even if you can save $5 (or euros) in one place and set it aside for the dream dressage horse, it will add up.

    I had credit card debt once and do not recommend it. There's no substitute for having even a small pile of money in the bank.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan. 21, 2003
    Location
    Charles Town, WV
    Posts
    6,637

    Default

    You would be much better off leasing a horse there and taking lessons, than buying and trying to ship it. Anything can happen. Learn how to ride well and buy a horse when you get back and you won't have to worry if you have the money to ship it when you return or whether you can sell it if you don't have the money to ship it.

    Lessons and lesson horses are great over there. You can usually take lessons on a much better horse than you can afford to buy and learn lots more.
    Tranquility Farm - Proud breeder of Born in the USA Sport Horses, and Cob-sized Warmbloods
    Now apparently completely invisible!



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug. 26, 2010
    Location
    in the woodwork....
    Posts
    1,650

    Default

    Just keep saving! In the meantime, enjoy the time you have now to be horse free, do some of the things you wanted to do but couldn't because you had a horse.

    Remember, the more you save, the more horse you will be able to buy, and you will be able to outfit him better. The cheapest thing about buying a horse, is the horse!



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Nov. 25, 2008
    Location
    Stuttgart, Germany
    Posts
    558

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tiki View Post
    You would be much better off leasing a horse there and taking lessons, than buying and trying to ship it. Anything can happen. Learn how to ride well and buy a horse when you get back and you won't have to worry if you have the money to ship it when you return or whether you can sell it if you don't have the money to ship it.

    Lessons and lesson horses are great over there. You can usually take lessons on a much better horse than you can afford to buy and learn lots more.
    Unfortunately, in my area the school horses are the epitome of the idea of "school horse". They are all ridden with side reins or neck stretchers and don't know above leg yield and are accustomed to beginner riders that are learning posting trot. I've looked at several barns so far but that is all to be found. Southern Germany is very different from Northern Germany in that respect from what I hear.
    I am schooling 4th/PSG level dressage and am looking to part lease an Intermediare level horse for the winter. I just got lucky finding him because I am friends with a Grand Prix rider that lives an hour from me and the horse belongs to a gal that boards with her. I'll have to drive an hour just to get to the barn to ride to do this but will get to ride a super horse and take regular lessons so it will be worth it. My goal is to buy a european bred young dressage horse and get a good start on him before returning to the States. After I save for the purchase price then I will save for the shipping price. (If my horse in the States sells that will be shipping and then paying off my husband's car but I need a plan B just in case!). Yes, anything can happen, and that's why I'm going to take my time finding a horse and when I find the right one will have insurance .



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Mar. 24, 2010
    Location
    Tucson
    Posts
    5,786

    Default

    I ended up getting my guy nearly 4 years after I originally intended to get a horse. The money I had saved instead went into bailing relatives out of financial trouble.

    By saving and waiting until I had the money for him, I ended up with a horse who exceeded my original expectations for a horse, who was far more talented and suited for me than I thought I would find. This seems to always happen - our expectations rise in the time we wait, and we end up with a horse who is well beyond the horse we would have otherwise purchased in talent and suitability.

    In your case, it sounds like you have a fantastic opportunity to learn and grow, too! I would struggle with not having my own horse to be growing toward the future with in your situation, but think of it as you're learning the things which will help make your future horse have an even better future with you.
    My horse is a dressage diva so I don't have to be.

    Quote Originally Posted by katarine
    If you have a fat gay horse that likes Parelli, you're really screwed



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