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  1. #1
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    Oct. 31, 2006
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    Default Corrective shoes changes gaits - HELP!!!

    Short background. Horse is 16, suffering from mild ringbone. Vet/farrier podiatrist from clinic put the Sigafoo shoes on him. He's always been a nice balance horse but very large. I have always had trouble sitting his trot and his canter was always very jumpy behind but I could stay with it just fine.

    Now with these shoes, his trot is easier to sit but his canter is like the derailing freight train. He's killing me. I feel as though he has lost all coordination and I'm almost afraid to canter him. I can do it in a half seat but of course that's no good for what we are doing. It's like a pile driver.

    My trainer thinks all of this is because he has been off a while during the time we were trying to come up with a management system for the ringbone, but I really feel it is the shoes. I've had times when I haven't been able to keep him in work and never had him feel like this.

    But very strangely the trot is a lot easier to sit. Am I just nuts or what?



  2. #2
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    Mar. 24, 2010
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    Sounds like reduced fitness to me - makes trots smaller and canters off-balance.
    My horse is a dressage diva so I don't have to be.

    Quote Originally Posted by katarine
    If you have a fat gay horse that likes Parelli, you're really screwed



  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by redhorse5 View Post
    I've had times when I haven't been able to keep him in work and never had him feel like this.
    If it's been a few years since those times, then it could be a reduced fitness exacerbated by increased age.

    However, I'd be more inclined to think you're gut feeling is more correct. Could be the placement of the shoes, could be the trim, could be a combination, which is causing problems with the ringbone, or just causing problems.

    Have you called the farrier to discuss this?

    What does the horse look like on the lunge?
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



  4. #4
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    Feb. 6, 2003
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    Hi. Maybe try posting this in Horsecare with a title of 'ringbone: new shoes change gaits', or something like that?

    1) What sort of shoes did your horse wear all around before - wide web, keg, eventers?

    2) Are the sigafoos only in front, and there are steel shoes behind? Are these the same type of steel shoes behind that the horse would normally wear, or a different type? The difference between lighter shoes in front, and the normal shoes behind could cause the gait change.

    3) Are these Sigafoos Series I? They have a slightly beveled edge, so this will increase the breakover and the horse can breakover where ever he wants - so this might be completely different than what the horse is used to. This, coupled with the fact that they might weigh less than the previous shoes, could account for changing the hang time of the legs wearing the Sigafoos (think: hunter people put aluminum to get a flatter, longer stride) vs those wearing the steel.

    4) Lastly, did you get xrays before shoe application? Did the vet recommend these shoes, or the farrier?



  5. #5
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    Mar. 24, 2008
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    Absolutely, the shoes can change gaits. Isn't that the point of them to a certain extent (of course, for the better would be desirable, not the reverse).

    The breakover could have been altered to the extent that the horse is having trouble coping. A smaller trot would mean he is mincing his steps for some reason. I don't think that's a sign of fitness - can you make him do the bigger trot?

    And not just breakover but his entire stride length seems altered to where he's having difficuly, maybe 'protecting' himself in the trot, and over reaching or trying not to, in the canter?

    Definitely a discussion with the farrier is in order.



  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by JB View Post
    However, I'd be more inclined to think you're gut feeling is more correct. Could be the placement of the shoes, could be the trim, could be a combination, which is causing problems with the ringbone, or just causing problems.
    This is a good point, too. Gut feelings are usually your body telling you something you know but haven't identified for sure, so there's probably more telling you it's a change due to the shoes and not fitness than you can clarify for us right now.

    I've repeatedly seen the changes you mention happen due to lack of fitness, but given the gut feeling, I think all the possibilities mentioned here are spot on and am rethinking my original post. The shoeing CAN cause changes, I just wouldn't have expected it to affect the canter so much... but it could be.
    My horse is a dressage diva so I don't have to be.

    Quote Originally Posted by katarine
    If you have a fat gay horse that likes Parelli, you're really screwed



  7. #7
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    Mar. 20, 2007
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    If he has been off a while.. why are you cantering already ?? why not strengthen his topline. Get some good ground work done to fit him up some and light walk trot hacks until his back and hind end are ready.

    also you may have to put up with some change in gait to accomodate keeping him comfortable.



  8. #8
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    Your post got me curious as to how other ringbone horses are shoed, so I posted something in Horsecare: http://www.chronofhorse.com/forum/sh...d.php?t=270165

    As for cantering, well, horses have been known canter on their own around their paddock. Often times arthritic horses choose to canter on their own during warm up - you start out troting and they decide they want to canter. People with arthric horses often know that cantering first during the warm up loosens the horse up better/quicker, than making them trot when they are stiff. Could be because the canter has more air time (easier on the joints) than a trot. Quicker break over on the arthric joints.



  9. #9
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    Apr. 27, 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fantastic View Post
    .....People with arthric horses often know that cantering first during the warm up loosens the horse up better/quicker, than making them trot when they are stiff. ....
    My old trakehner was like that - much better to warm up with some nice flowing canter work than start with trot.

    Unfortunately my 9 y.o. gelding has some arthritic changes in his hocks - and the canter work first helps him as well.



  10. #10
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    He is totally fit enough to canter. These shoes were installed by the equine podiatrist/vet and he is not lame at all in the shoes. He always warmed up at the canter. His trot is larger not smaller (we've been calling him the Saddlesteiner).

    I think the aluminum shoes being lighter must be part of it in the trot work but he seems to just not know what to do with his feet in the canter. He is throwing me way out of the back of the saddle at the canter and I just can't sit down. He's always had a jumpy canter but this is ridiculous. Even my husband who knows little about riding came out to the ring and said it looked dangerous.



  11. #11
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    Maybe your farrier can watch your horse trot and canter and see if the shoeing suits him or he needs something else.



  12. #12
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    Thanks for the replies. I'm going to have the vet/farrier stop by and have a look. I'm thrilled though that the shoes have helped.



  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by redhorse5 View Post
    He is totally fit enough to canter. These shoes were installed by the equine podiatrist/vet and he is not lame at all in the shoes. He always warmed up at the canter. His trot is larger not smaller (we've been calling him the Saddlesteiner).

    I think the aluminum shoes being lighter must be part of it in the trot work but he seems to just not know what to do with his feet in the canter. He is throwing me way out of the back of the saddle at the canter and I just can't sit down. He's always had a jumpy canter but this is ridiculous. Even my husband who knows little about riding came out to the ring and said it looked dangerous.
    So wait... his corrective shoes improved his gaits, so you're posting here to ask us to help figure out how to degrade them to where they were when he was hurting?
    My horse is a dressage diva so I don't have to be.

    Quote Originally Posted by katarine
    If you have a fat gay horse that likes Parelli, you're really screwed



  14. #14
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    "looking dangerous" doesn't sound like an improvement, so yes, what is the real deal - is this an improvement to the point that you can't ride it now, or is he so discombobulated that he's just not right?
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



  15. #15
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    Jun. 3, 2007
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    I used a corrective shoer for my horse earlier this year and it took him a couple of weeks to really get comfortable with his new feet. He went from standard steel shoes to aluminum Morrison shoes with rolled toes. Since the breakover happened much quicker than before, he was clumsy to start with.
    By the second shoeing, his gaits were huge and his back was super-swingy.

    He will get used to it--it just may take a little while. You'll get used to it, too. Just imagine you're riding a new horse with super gaits and you just have to learn to sit them.
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  16. #16
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    Oct. 13, 2006
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    With the kind of shoes a horse will need for ring bone, Ive seen most move kinda quick on the breakover.

    This can make the canter slower in back and faster in front, and of course then the horse is discombobulated.

    Unfortunately the ring bone and supportive shoeing is priority so its possible you will have to deal with a bit of quick movment.



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