The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 46
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec. 7, 2001
    Location
    Cullowhere?, NC
    Posts
    8,652

    Default Dogs and Ivermectin--Great outcome! post 41

    I have a friend who's dear Aussie picked up just a few dropped grains on a worming day and ended up spending the weekend in the emergency clinic. She's hanging in so far, sedated and on seizure meds. Anyone have any good-outcome stories to share? We're all really worried. This is one of the most tightly run barns I know of, a total accident, but s%&t happens ...
    Last edited by monstrpony; Aug. 23, 2010 at 11:15 AM.
    "One person's cowboy is another person's blooming idiot" -- katarine

    Spay and neuter. Please.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec. 19, 2009
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    1,287

    Default

    wow, jingles for the poor pup! Was it just ivermectin though? She must have gotten quite a bit because ivermectin is used in dogs, I know it was the main ingredient in Heartguard which I used to give to mine. Some dogs will eat just about anything... hope she recuperates!



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar. 6, 2009
    Posts
    8,883

    Default

    Search this ~ there was an incident/ accident of this nature last spring I believe ~ the dog did pull through but it was an emeregncy case ~ Jingles for this dog ~ Jingle Jingle Jingle & AO ~ Always Optimistic ~
    Zu Zu Bailey " IT"S A WONDERFUL LIFE !"



  4. #4
    Join Date
    May. 9, 2008
    Posts
    2,887

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by monstrpony View Post
    I have a friend who's dear Aussie picked up just a few dropped grains on a worming day and ended up spending the weekend in the emergency clinic. She's hanging in so far, sedated and on seizure meds. Anyone have any good-outcome stories to share? We're all really worried. This is one of the most tightly run barns I know of, a total accident, but s%&t happens ...

    My Beardie mix reacts to most every wormer, vaccine and flea/tick preventative. He got very, very sick once after rubbing up against our Golden after he was treated with Frontline. It was a nightmare...but he pulled through fine!

    I am SO, SO, SO careful with the horses at worming time but s$%#t does happen. I hope the dear Aussie pulls through and comes home soon!
    I Loff My Quarter Horse & I love Fenway Bartholomule cliques

    Just somebody with a positive outlook on life...go ahead...hate me for that.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    May. 9, 2008
    Posts
    2,887

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by oldpony66 View Post
    wow, jingles for the poor pup! Was it just ivermectin though? She must have gotten quite a bit because ivermectin is used in dogs, I know it was the main ingredient in Heartguard which I used to give to mine. Some dogs will eat just about anything... hope she recuperates!
    Some dogs, collie breeds especially, can become very ill when exposed to Ivermectin.
    I Loff My Quarter Horse & I love Fenway Bartholomule cliques

    Just somebody with a positive outlook on life...go ahead...hate me for that.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr. 14, 2007
    Location
    Pen Argyl PA
    Posts
    4,030

    Default

    my friend's JRT got into a tube of paste ivermectin a few years ago, she had a rough time, could have gone blind, but she recovered. I can't remember if it was paralysis and temporary eyesight loss, or what happened.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun. 6, 2010
    Location
    Ontario Canada
    Posts
    82

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by equineartworks View Post
    Some dogs, collie breeds especially, can become very ill when exposed to Ivermectin.
    It's dogs effected by the MDR1 mutation. You can test for it these days so you know if ivermectin will potentially kill your dog or not. Without the mutation it is perfectly safe. Many people with Aussies and Collies just stay clear of anything containing ivermectin as a precaution though- even though they are not the only breeds effected by the mutation they are the two people most commonly know about.

    Washington State University study on the frequency of the mutation in breeds
    http://www.vetmed.wsu.edu/depts-VCPL/breeds.aspx



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug. 9, 2002
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    1,925

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by oldpony66 View Post
    She must have gotten quite a bit because ivermectin is used in dogs, I know it was the main ingredient in Heartguard which I used to give to mine.
    Not so. A very small amount can harm a dog that is sensitive (see gene mutation above).

    The amount of ivermectin in Heartgard (for dogs 51-100 lb. in size) is 272 micrograms. A tiny, tiny amount.

    The correct dose of ivermectin for the horse is 91 micrograms per pound. So your average tube of wormer that treats a 1250 lb. horse contains 113,750 micrograms of ivermectin..

    A very, very small amount of horse dewormer can make your dog sick.

    OP, accidents happen. Hope your friend's dog is OK.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct. 18, 2000
    Posts
    22,455

    Default

    My dog almost died from Ivermectin toxicosis last summer.

    I did not realize he had ingested it. He woke me in the middle of the night; staggering around blind.

    I got him to the ER (hour drive) and soon after he started to convulse.

    It was touch and go for a few days; and his vision did not return for a long time (I still don't think it's 100%)

    But he's here and lying at my feet - my good old friend.

    I hope your friend's dog recovers.

    For the record - any dog can die from ivermectin toxicosis. As others have posted some breeds have problems with it - but ANY dog can die from an overdose.

    Homer is about 70lbs; and thought I don't know how much he ingested - I had just wormed a horse weighing approx. 1800lbs. God only know how much he ate. I'm usually very very careful with dewormers and have never had any problems until that one time - I never knew he'd eaten it.

    If the dog starts convulsing, or goes into a coma, recovery becomes less likely. Homer had started to convulse and was given valium - but he never went into a coma.

    Here's the old thread on Homer's close call. http://www.chronofhorse.com/forum/sh...ighlight=Homer
    Last edited by JSwan; Aug. 16, 2010 at 10:43 AM. Reason: to add link



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr. 3, 2003
    Location
    Up the creek from bar.ka
    Posts
    10,041

    Default

    I had this happen this spring. Little dog picked up some in the barn that horses must have spit out.

    Dewormed the horses at 7pm (IIRC) and then next morning my little dog woke up blind.

    She was still walking around and ate and drank and didn't have any troubles other than being completely blind. As each hour went by she improved. By 3 days she was completely back to normal like nothing ever happened.

    Now I am VERY careful with the dewormers. I deworm the horses out in their pastures where the dogs never go so that I'm sure they wont pick some up.



    I sure hope your dog recovers. Jingles from all of us here at Stoneybrook.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Dec. 7, 2001
    Location
    Cullowhere?, NC
    Posts
    8,652

    Default

    Dog was released from emergency clinic this morning, but friend took her to her local clinic for more therapy, still ataxic and having tremors. Thanks for your stories & experiences & jingles!!
    "One person's cowboy is another person's blooming idiot" -- katarine

    Spay and neuter. Please.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Dec. 19, 2009
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    1,287

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MafiaPrincess View Post
    It's dogs effected by the MDR1 mutation. You can test for it these days so you know if ivermectin will potentially kill your dog or not. Without the mutation it is perfectly safe. Many people with Aussies and Collies just stay clear of anything containing ivermectin as a precaution though- even though they are not the only breeds effected by the mutation they are the two people most commonly know about.

    Washington State University study on the frequency of the mutation in breeds
    http://www.vetmed.wsu.edu/depts-VCPL/breeds.aspx
    wow, I learn something new every day! Thanks for that info, I had never heard that before.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Feb. 25, 2004
    Location
    DFW
    Posts
    334

    Default

    Wow! I had no idea about this either. Glad I read this thread!



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Feb. 27, 1999
    Location
    Virginia and North Carolina, Parrothead Clique!
    Posts
    4,939

    Default

    An IV lipid infusion is being used in some ER clinics to treat ivermectin toxicosis. Not all ERs will have it or be familiar with this. It's called Liposyn, and you can sometimes get it from a human hospital. It will be discussed at the upcoming IVECCS meeting in San Antonio.

    Sadly this happens also when well meaning owners try to deworm the dog by giving a "smidge" of the horse paste.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jun. 6, 2010
    Location
    Ontario Canada
    Posts
    82

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Anne View Post
    Sadly this happens also when well meaning owners try to deworm the dog by giving a "smidge" of the horse paste.
    If you know what you are deworming with and what the dosage for a dog is.. you can calculate the horse wormer out for the appropriate dog size. Many of the wormers on the market are the same drugs used on both animals.

    I've used ivomec which is ivermectin for years on my cockers. I've used Quest on tape worm issues before but I know the dosage for my dogs size vs how much is in a tube.

    You can kill almost any animal with an overdose, that is why its called an OVERdose. You can kill horses with horse dewormer too... (actually you can die from water ingestion if you overdose too)



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jan. 31, 2007
    Location
    where its cold
    Posts
    850

    Default

    You know - not even all vets are familiar w/ this - let alone would know the proper treatment.

    I was talking w/ my local vet and I asked him about ivermectin and dogs and he looked at me like I had grown 2 heads. Seriously, so I didn't press him and I thought maybe I had gotten it wrong...

    I really like my (horse, cow) vet. I know he keeps up w/ the horse and cow literature. Please tell me that dog vets are more aware of this...



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Mar. 6, 2009
    Posts
    8,883

    Default

    Jingles continue for this dog ~ Jingles & AO ~ Always Optimistic ~
    Zu Zu Bailey " IT"S A WONDERFUL LIFE !"



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Oct. 18, 2000
    Posts
    22,455

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Anne View Post
    An IV lipid infusion is being used in some ER clinics to treat ivermectin toxicosis.
    That may have been what they were going to use on my dog had he not responded to their initial efforts.

    It's possible for an animal to ingest something they're not supposed to, even when the owner/handler goes to great lengths to ensure the animal is kept safe.

    Accidents happen.



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Aug. 4, 2005
    Location
    Oakland CA
    Posts
    224

    Default

    Several years ago, one of my dogs was given Ivermectin to treat mange.

    It took about three days for symptoms to appear. She was confused, falling down, peeing on her bed - once I came home and found her w/her head behind a chair. She was trying to push the chair away, rather than go around it.

    It went on for a long time - about 3-4 weeks. I considered putting her down as there was no real treatment for it. The vet recommended IV drips, but that didn't work - ivermectin is excreted through the bowel, not the kidneys.

    I really didn't have much information on it, and the symptoms were very distressing. Luckily, I hung in there, I just couldn't bring myself to put her down.

    My mother got in touch with her veterinarian who, it turned out, had done a considerable amount of research on ivermectin. She was very reassuring, advised me to discontinue the IV drips and just wait it out, and assured me that there would be no permanent damage.

    If I remember right, death occurs if the nerve synapses fail to maintain the heartbeat - the message doesn't get through and heart failure occurs. She advised against exercise until the dog was completely asymptomatic.

    This vet referred me to a researcher at Merck. He gave me the same advice. Merck has a colony of dogs that react to Ivermectin.

    Ivermectin has this effect mainly on collie-type dogs. I know it's often used to treat mange on other breeds. I've known a lot of pitbulls that have been treated this way without any ill effects.

    My dog made a full recovery. DNA testing showed that she was a sheltie/GSD mix.

    She was about 4 when this occurred, and died in October 2008 at the age of 16.5.



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Feb. 6, 2003
    Location
    NorthEast
    Posts
    24,668

    Default

    Best wishes for the Aussie!

    I know it's normal to have dogs in barns...but this is one of the many reasons I keep dogs and barns totally separate at home. Probably just my over-cautious "the sky is falling" attitude but over the years I've seen way too many avoidable dog injuries and deaths caused by dogs in barns. And with my luck...I'd lose a dog the first 5 minutes ir was in the barn.

    let us know how the dog is doing?
    You jump in the saddle,
    Hold onto the bridle!
    Jump in the line!
    ...Belefonte



Similar Threads

  1. Dogs and Ivermectin or Quest
    By LauraKY in forum Around The Farm
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: Feb. 1, 2011, 10:12 AM
  2. GREAT PYRENEES DOGS
    By Mamare in forum Around The Farm
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: Jun. 10, 2009, 03:19 PM
  3. Vets-Ivermectin sensitivity in Collie dogs?
    By Jersey Fresh in forum Around The Farm
    Replies: 18
    Last Post: May. 8, 2009, 08:14 PM
  4. Replies: 4
    Last Post: Apr. 1, 2009, 10:09 AM
  5. Dogs that are great around horses
    By Nikki17 in forum Off Course
    Replies: 57
    Last Post: Nov. 7, 2008, 03:55 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
randomness