The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 59
  1. #1
    Join Date
    May. 21, 2008
    Location
    Sonoma County, California
    Posts
    2,523

    Default Fixed rear tack in trailer: love it or hate it?

    I just bought a used trailer that was a great deal and had just about everything I wanted. The only thing I did NOT want is the permanent rear tack compartment.

    I can have the fixed tack removed completely at a cost of about $400.

    This trailer also has a side unload ramp. I don't like how the solid rear tackroom closes down the back of the trailer. I can't really turn horses around inside and they have to back out this long tunnel to the ramp.

    I'd like to hear from the wise folks of COTH about rear tacks. Love them or hate them? Should I live with this and see how I like or or rip it out?



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov. 4, 2003
    Location
    Dallas, Georgia
    Posts
    16,747

    Default

    Hate 'em
    <>< Sorrow Looks Back. Worry Looks Around. Faith Looks Up! -- Being negative only makes a difficult journey more difficult. You may be given a cactus, but you don't have to sit on it.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb. 18, 2005
    Posts
    935

    Default

    Rip it out!



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul. 31, 2007
    Posts
    15,409

    Default

    Hate all rear tacks. Sliding walls with shavings getting underneath.

    But that's just a rant.

    Where else where you put your tack in this trailer? Anywhere has got to be better than the back of your SUV or dressing a good pickup like a sissy with a going-to-leak camper top.

    Oops, another rant.

    My point is that I'd use it for a while and see how much you really like or hate it in practice before I changed the trailer.

    PS Did you find an acid wash place?
    The armchair saddler
    Politically Pro-Cat



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug. 8, 2001
    Location
    up the hill from the little river (that floods alarmingly often)
    Posts
    3,612

    Default

    Hate it, and exactly for the reasons you mentioned.

    Love the design that Double D offers on its trailers, where the rear tack compartment swings out. That was a really good feature.
    Full-time bargain hunter.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug. 18, 2003
    Location
    Brenham, TX
    Posts
    4,885

    Default

    Hate 'em and wouldn't have a trailer with one. My personal opinion is that they are just an accident waiting to happen. I would pay the $400 to have it removed. I had my 4 Star custom built without one and I LOVE it. Only downside it no butt bar in the back stall so I have to be sure to untie the horse in the back stall before opening the door. Luckily I don't have any horses that are bad about this but I wouldn't want a horse that will explode backwards as soon as the door starts to open back there.
    Triple J Ranch Sporthorses
    www.triplejsporthorse.com
    Member - OMGiH I LOFF my mare(s) clique



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr. 28, 2008
    Posts
    7,400

    Default

    I would give it a try and see how it works for you. A lot of the disadvantages of a rear tack would be minimized by the front unload.

    I personally like them in a slant load with experienced loaders, as then you can haul the horses untied in the slants and put the hay on the ground, which I consider much safer and healthier for the horses. I had a lot of success hauling in my old 4H slant with even young horses untied. It had a side unload for my poor backer, everything else went out backwards fine.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul. 5, 2007
    Location
    Beside Myself ~ Western NY
    Posts
    7,022

    Default

    Hate them. Traded the trailer.

    Fixed tack compartments in a slant load require the last horse to load and turn immediately. If you have a hesitant loader, it may look in, see that divider 3 feet from his nose, and conclude there is no room in there for a whole horse. Unloading, it not only requires the last horse to make a turn while backing out, but also decreases visibility for all horses unloading.
    The more perfect our happiness,
    the more nagging and wretched
    do our unsolved problems seem.
    ~ Gordon Grand



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar. 26, 2005
    Location
    Back to Normal.. or as close as I'll ever get
    Posts
    9,593

    Default

    Hate mine & I have yet to even use it!

    I got the truck/trailer combo in March and all together the deal was too good to pass up.
    To date I haven't even used the trailer.
    But the thought of having 17H+ of Sam trying to load his Wide Self on slantwise with the 1/2 ramp makes me uneasy.

    $400 to undo it?
    Seems reasonable.
    I keep meaning to call the guys who did the conversion to ask the same thing.
    But I also have a lead on a possible trade-in for a straightload w/no ramp or rear tack that would make me even happier.
    *friend of bar.ka*RIP all my lovely boys, gone too soon:
    Steppin' Out 1988-2004
    Hey Vern! 1982-2009
    Cash's Bay Threat 1994-2009



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep. 14, 2004
    Location
    Eastern Kansas
    Posts
    1,127

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SmartAlex View Post
    Fixed tack compartments in a slant load require the last horse to load and turn immediately. If you have a hesitant loader, it may look in, see that divider 3 feet from his nose, and conclude there is no room in there for a whole horse. Unloading, it not only requires the last horse to make a turn while backing out, but also decreases visibility for all horses unloading.
    Not sure what type of trailer you're describing, because it isn't anything like mine. The rear fixed tack compartment of my 3H slant isn't so wide a horse has to 'turn' to any degree...just slants, like the other two stalls. Neither, does the compartment decrease visibility upon backing from any of the stalls. .

    Anyway, a fixed rear tack compartment doesn't bother me at all.
    Is it me or do 99.9% of cowboys just look better with their hats on?
    <><



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Apr. 17, 2002
    Location
    between the barn and the pond
    Posts
    14,495

    Default

    I am happy with mine and reluctant loaders just get loaded first. Big yawn.

    I've never collapsed the rear tack in order to unload a horse. It's just not that big of a deal.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb. 9, 2005
    Location
    Upper Midwest
    Posts
    5,833

    Default

    Why do you need to turn them around and go out the rear? You have a side ramp, right? I think it would be ok in this case, because you DO have a side ramp for unloading.

    If I'm picturing this right...
    Siouxland Sporthorses: http://slsfarm.blogspot.com/

    DIY Journey of Remodeling the Farmette: http://weownblackacre.blogspot.com/



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jul. 14, 2000
    Location
    NM
    Posts
    1,529

    Default

    We have a removable rear tack that we leave in all the time. Ours works just fine. Horses get used to it. Horses learn to back out of the stall - we just toss the lead rope over the back of the horse, turn thier head a little to the right and they figure out they need to slightly bend as they back out.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    May. 21, 2008
    Location
    Sonoma County, California
    Posts
    2,523

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by TrotTrotPumpkn View Post
    Why do you need to turn them around and go out the rear? You have a side ramp, right? I think it would be ok in this case, because you DO have a side ramp for unloading.

    If I'm picturing this right...
    Thank you SO much for your input on the fixed rear tack! Very interesting ---- and very helpful. I am transitioning from a straight load (my preference) to this slant load, and it's a big adjustment for me and the horses (I am wishing for a 2+1 honestly). I am soooo ready to rip this tack room out, but I think I will try it out for a bit.

    In answer to trot trot pumpkin's question, that side ramp you THINK would be a way to unload all three horses, but think about how those slant dividers work. You unload #1 down the ramp, and #2 is next to him, but there is no way to back him up and open the divider all the way to walk him forward if you have a #3 on the trailer. If you hauled without dividers, you could use the ramp easily. Hope that makes sense.

    Thank you again!



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Nov. 17, 2009
    Location
    Kinston, NC
    Posts
    41

    Default

    Here is the patented SafeTack design, exclusively on Double D's, swing out rear tack with safety rear divider, seems to solve a lot of problems.

    http://www.doubledtrailers.com/safet..._Gooseneck.htm

    click on the images and read about SafeTack rear tack design

    http://www.doubledtrailers.com/safet...eck.htm#images


    Bartley Heath
    bartley@DoubleDTrailers.com
    Buy Factory Direct and $ave at DoubleDTrailers.com



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Sep. 25, 2005
    Location
    The Land of the Frozen
    Posts
    13,787

    Default

    Absolutely HATE, no DESPISE it. Stupidest design ever. I have a 2-horse Jackson with tack in the back, and dressing room in front.

    I have to be so careful hauling horses for other people. If we have the tiniest bit of doubt whether they will back out the skinny hole in the back, then they have to be put into the first stall, so they "can" turn around if necessary. And any horse above about 15 hands and 1,200 lbs ain't turning around inside there, no matter what. I've gotten more than one horse stuck in that rear stall that refused to back out.

    Also, once the back horse is in place, a human can't fit in there with the horse. There is no side door. So you have to send the horse in, shut the back door, and hope they don't put their head down and under the divider, while you go around the side, reach in the window, and tie their head up.

    And the other totally stupid thing is that when I'm standing on the ground outside the tack room, I cannot reach the bridle hooks without standing on a ladder. They are at the way top of the door (it's a 7 foot trailer) so the bridle hook is literally like 6'6" up in the air. I'm 5'7" so not short, but I still have to stand on something, or jump to get my bridles off the hook. And the top rack of the 3-tier saddle stand is also useless because it's above your head. Totally stupid design. I intend to rip mine out as soon as possible.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jul. 13, 2006
    Posts
    2,455

    Default

    I have always had slant loads, 2 with a removable rear tack (never actually removed it though) and my current one with a solid rear tack. Never had an issue. Instead of spending the $400 on removing the rear tack why don't you just spend the $100 and have your dividers modified so you can use it as a true walk thru. All they have to do it make it so they open in the front and back, basically just a pin and hole situation. My trainers trailer has that, but honestly only had 1 horse that wouldn't back out of a trailer and always put him in the front spot.



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Feb. 11, 2010
    Location
    S. Calif.
    Posts
    754

    Default

    We have a three horse slant load with removable rear tack. The only time we've removed it is to go pick up hay.

    All our horses are taught to self load and back out to unload when you touch their tail.

    Happy Trails~
    Joyce



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Apr. 17, 2002
    Location
    between the barn and the pond
    Posts
    14,495

    Default

    ermm....


    http://thestepstool.co.cc/price_Coll...003C1FCTS.html


    and lots of ways and options for brush boxes, bridle racks, accessory storage, on the inside of that door to the rear tack.

    http://www.horsetraileraccessorystor...0Rope%20Repair



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jul. 14, 2000
    Location
    NM
    Posts
    1,529

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Auventera Two View Post
    Also, once the back horse is in place, a human can't fit in there with the horse. There is no side door. So you have to send the horse in, shut the back door, and hope they don't put their head down and under the divider, while you go around the side, reach in the window, and tie their head up.
    If you are worried about this happening - run a lunge line through the window, attach it to horse, pick up the extra as they go in keeping a hold of it so that they bring their head through the window, shut door and then tie up horse. I've never had a horse put their head under the divider 1st thing. They always want to stick it out the window.

    To avoid pee or shavings in the back tack area - cut a floor mat the size of your tack area. Place on top of the floor mat that is already there. Helps block anything coming through the bottom crack. Some sawdust gets through but certainly not as much. Pee doesn't get on your stuff but flows along the edge of the new mat and toward the back door.



Similar Threads

  1. Boarders you just love to hate...
    By AnastasiaBeaverhousen in forum Off Course
    Replies: 232
    Last Post: May. 4, 2012, 02:55 PM
  2. Replies: 22
    Last Post: May. 1, 2012, 07:56 PM
  3. Replies: 3
    Last Post: Apr. 29, 2012, 02:06 AM
  4. Rear Tack in Slant Load
    By Black Points in forum Around The Farm
    Replies: 39
    Last Post: Feb. 19, 2012, 01:34 PM
  5. Replies: 0
    Last Post: Apr. 18, 2011, 09:59 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •