The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Results 1 to 16 of 16
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul. 23, 2004
    Posts
    181

    Default Dismount help for painful feet?

    Does anyone have any suggestions for possible dismounting methods for one with extremely painful feet?

    After battling lyme's for the last three years, I am SO happy to be back in the saddle again with my dear boy, (AND able to read CoTH without sobbing and wondering when, if ever, I'd be able to join you all and ride again) but find I'm left with some residual issues that I am hoping can be mitigated, if not completely resolved.

    The biggest problem at the moment is that my feet are extremely painful to even walk on, and I am afraid that the concussive force of my dismount of yore (both feet out of stirrups, swing leg over, vault to ground) will only serve to make matters worse. I am sure that the extra weight I've put on while sick and immobile is certainly not helping any.

    I caught a glimpse of myself while riding in the indoor mirrors today and I was shocked - can anyone say giant Puffalump on a Breyer pony?

    Anyway, any and all suggestions for a more gentle dismount greatly appreciated.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct. 8, 2009
    Location
    Arroyo Grande,CA
    Posts
    116

    Default

    What about dismounting to a mounting block, that way it isn't as far to the ground, also slide down the horse don't jump.

    Diane



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug. 13, 2009
    Posts
    158

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by cadriver View Post
    What about dismounting to a mounting block, that way it isn't as far to the ground, also slide down the horse don't jump.

    Diane
    I see many riders using the mounting block to dismount at my barn. It's easier on the joints, especially the knees.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul. 15, 2003
    Posts
    763

    Default

    I have nerve damage in my right arm which precludes hanging on to the cantle when dismounting. So I use a panic strap and hang onto that with my left hand and slide to the ground. The worst thing I've done is some minor but visible scuff marks on my saddle from zippers.

    My b/o has always said it is not a good idea to dismount to a block. If you have someone around they can help you by supporting you as you slide off. This is how we dismount many of the riders in the therapy program.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb. 6, 2003
    Location
    Deep South
    Posts
    14,469

    Default

    Gel Insoles ?? http://www.drscholls.com/drscholls/massaginggel.jsp
    and sort of slither down the side like us old folks! ( I take both feet out and as I swing right leg over I get belly on the saddle and sort of slither to the ground gently). Being over 60 has some rewards, but getting off a horse with style ain't one of them!

    On the other hand you coul slide off in to a nice soft patch of gooey mud !
    ... _. ._ .._. .._



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb. 23, 2005
    Location
    Spotsylvania, VA
    Posts
    12,711

    Default

    There are a few things I do, depending on situation.

    I rode at one place that had a wonderful mounting platform, it was maybe 2 feet off the ground but about 3 by 6 feet long that I dismounted onto. I wouldn't want to try to land on one of the plastic stools. Without that I either park Sophie in a ditch, or at least downhill of my landing zone or slide down carefully
    I wasn't always a Smurf
    Penmerryl's Sophie RIDSH
    "I ain't as good as I once was but I'm as good once as I ever was"
    The ignore list is my friend. It takes 2 to argue.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr. 12, 2007
    Location
    Farmington, MN
    Posts
    113

    Default

    The easiest way for me to dismount and avoid the electric shock of landing on my feet hard is to wrap both arms around the horse's neck and keep hold while I swing down. Seems to work pretty good as long as I'm not in a western saddle. Otherwise perhaps a neck strap to hold onto?



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul. 23, 2004
    Posts
    181

    Default

    Thanks so much for the responses! Being of the mature and ah, "curvy" persuasion, I can only imagine my no longer svelte nor remotely graceful self attempting to find a plastic mounting block! One or the other of my overendowed curves would surely launch me quite aways away from the wanted landing spot

    Quote Originally Posted by carolprudm View Post
    There are a few things I do, depending on situation.

    I rode at one place that had a wonderful mounting platform, it was maybe 2 feet off the ground but about 3 by 6 feet long that I dismounted onto. I wouldn't want to try to land on one of the plastic stools.
    What a luxury! I, too, had one at a barn I used to ride at -- alas, not this one... And what to do in the indoor as well? Like the ditch/hill for outside though!

    Quote Originally Posted by Equibrit View Post
    Gel Insoles ?? http://www.drscholls.com/drscholls/massaginggel.jsp
    and sort of slither down the side like us old folks! ( I take both feet out and as I swing right leg over I get belly on the saddle and sort of slither to the ground gently). Being over 60 has some rewards, but getting off a horse with style ain't one of them!

    On the other hand you coul slide off in to a nice soft patch of gooey mud !
    My friend, I am not much behind you in age a'tall. And you slither? I'm so jealous As for the mud - BTDT, but never of my choice

    Quote Originally Posted by dougx3 View Post
    The easiest way for me to dismount and avoid the electric shock of landing on my feet hard is to wrap both arms around the horse's neck and keep hold while I swing down. Seems to work pretty good as long as I'm not in a western saddle. Otherwise perhaps a neck strap to hold onto?
    Dougx3, please come with me to my barn - I promise, me attempting your method would be the funniest thing you have witnessed in several years! We shall have a very, very good laugh at my attempt in the very least. And I am sure my horsie will give us both that wide open, white showing, left eye look that says "Woman, you have GOT to be kidding me!"

    But thank you all, for the great suggestions... I shall try them all!



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug. 3, 2004
    Location
    San Francisco
    Posts
    3,823

    Default

    I mount and dismount on a very tall mounting block. It is good for both of us.

    What would be the downside?
    A man must love a thing very much if he not only practices it without any hope of fame or money, but even practices it without any hope of doing it well.--G. K. Chesterton



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec. 25, 2006
    Location
    Overland, MO
    Posts
    1,254

    Default

    Mounting block, aka dismounting block. :-) I used to step off onto picnic tables, benches, anything that was tall and sturdy.

    Another thing you can do which helps is if you have to get off onto the ground, kick your feet out of the stirrups and roll your ankles around in both directions a few times, point your toes up and down, roll your ankles again --- this gets the circulation going and takes away a lot of the "sting" your feet can get, especially in cold weather, when you get off your horse.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan. 16, 2003
    Posts
    2,255

    Default

    just swing right leg over & put right foot down on the ground, then left. Make sure knees are bent. It's gonna hurt a little, just do it as quickly as possible and ride short horses/ponies.

    Be nice and kind to yourself. self-talking like Puffalump is not good! You ride because you want to and because you CAN, so rejoice



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb. 5, 2002
    Posts
    1,970

    Default

    I get the impression your horse is a pretty sturdy, accepting kinda guy? Try a crest dismount (caveat: you'll need some upper body strength). Take both feet out of the stirrups (or keep your left foot in but don't tell anyone I said so). Keeping your belly button pointed forward, bring your right leg over your horse's crest and sit sidesaddle - seat bones in their normal places (don't sit sideways with your belly button pointed left). Make sure that left foot is out of the stirrup now. Put your two hands on your horse's withers (not neck, in case he lowers his head). Roll onto your belly and use your arms to lower yourself slowly to the ground. The reason you roll onto your belly, instead of sliding off the horse facing away from the horse, is because your chance of falling onto your hands and knees (or doing a face plant!) is much less, and you can use your arms to control your descent.

    If you're not sure your horse will "get it," find a teenager to do it a few times to practice with him. My horse actually likes it better when we get off that way - go figure - I think it has something to do with the saddle and his withers.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Dec. 27, 2008
    Posts
    273

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by betsyk View Post
    I get the impression your horse is a pretty sturdy, accepting kinda guy? Try a crest dismount (caveat: you'll need some upper body strength). Take both feet out of the stirrups (or keep your left foot in but don't tell anyone I said so). Keeping your belly button pointed forward, bring your right leg over your horse's crest and sit sidesaddle - seat bones in their normal places (don't sit sideways with your belly button pointed left). Make sure that left foot is out of the stirrup now. Put your two hands on your horse's withers (not neck, in case he lowers his head). Roll onto your belly and use your arms to lower yourself slowly to the ground. The reason you roll onto your belly, instead of sliding off the horse facing away from the horse, is because your chance of falling onto your hands and knees (or doing a face plant!) is much less, and you can use your arms to control your descent.
    .
    This is how I have to do it too. My left ankle is "shot" and after ending up on my butt because my leg can't take the "boom".. the only thing that I do differently AND will change now, is getting my left foot out sooner. I also upgraded my paddock boots for the every day foot pain... Ariat Cobalts... as long as I wear them I don't have a limp... wierdest thing. I wear sneakers or flip flops I limp.. Cobalts... I can walk a mile with no pain.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    May. 2, 2002
    Posts
    1,312

    Default

    I have a lot of nerve damage in my feet and legs. Generally, by the time I have finished a ride, I cannot feel my feet and my legs collapse when they bear any weight. I slither down my very patient mounts and land on the mounting block. My legs quiver and collapse, so I hold on to the stirrup and my butt hits the mounting block. My horse and I hang out until I have a little more feeling and I can hobble out of the arena!
    Beth



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jan. 17, 2008
    Location
    Trails and woods
    Posts
    1,585

    Default

    I use a mounting block to get on and off the horse. Mare is well versed in mounting block etiquette. She has offered me no issues in doing so. I change the location I dismount so that she doesn't sour to the idea....Go directly to the mounting block and mommy will get off, NO...don't think so.....

    I can't get off safely unless I step down, IE western style. I swing right leg over saddle and step down onto ground with right foot. Then, I pull left foot out of stirrup.

    For the life of me, I can't get off her any other way. My right ankle will sublux, ie, partially dislocate, and I can't walk. Yes, I know it isn't quite safe, but I can't do it any other way......I have tried and tried again....but ankles won't cooperate.

    I always make sure that just the tip of my left toes/boot is in the stirrup. It is the only way I can do it....

    I wonder if others are the same.....and why not!
    Life is too short to argue with a mare! Just don't engage! It is much easier that way!

    Have fun, be safe, and let the mare think it is her idea!



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Nov. 12, 2002
    Location
    north carolina
    Posts
    296

    Default

    I have a friend help me down, guiding me down till I touch the ground.
    "Pride goeth before the Fall"



Similar Threads

  1. A New Way to Dismount
    By Mike Matson in forum Off Course
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: Nov. 21, 2011, 02:31 PM
  2. How do you dismount?
    By Ridinwyoming in forum Off Course
    Replies: 70
    Last Post: Nov. 3, 2011, 11:53 AM
  3. emergency dismount?
    By katherineyyyy in forum Hunter/Jumper
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: May. 15, 2011, 09:10 AM
  4. Unplanned dismount
    By Laurierace in forum Off Course
    Replies: 37
    Last Post: Dec. 9, 2010, 09:11 AM
  5. Replies: 43
    Last Post: Oct. 27, 2010, 02:36 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
randomness