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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb. 9, 2005
    Location
    Ocala, FL
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    Default Exercises for minor round ligament damage?

    Hi all,
    I had the vet out today to look at Gid's hocks. He has always had a slightly shorter step in right hind, and wants to carry it under his body on the inside and carry it out and away when it is outside. We thougth it was his hock or maybe stifle (since he will seem to trip over his right leg once in a while). It's all very subtle, and no pain or resistance.....
    ANyway, vet says it's not the hock, it's the round ligament. He probably had a bad crash in his former jumping career. SInce it involves the hip, it was not seen on the pre purchase pics. It's very minor.
    Right now, doing first level stuff, it is not a problem, and as he has become more fit over the past year, it has improved. Vet tells me it is not painful, just a biomechanical thing resulting in a slightly shortened step.
    Vet suggested long walks on straight lines, to strengthen the area, and Cosequin ASU.
    Can anyone recommend other exercises or stretches that might help? Or, stretches I should NOT do? (we do a variety of carrot stretches and leg stretches after we ride, including bringing the hind leg forward....)
    Thanks.
    (and I learned a thing or two today, about prepurchase exams and how horses hold their legs.......)
    L



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec. 13, 1999
    Location
    Greensboro, NC
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    37,345

    Default

    Your vet would be the one to ask about what mostly not to do, but assuming everything is fair game right now:
    - in addition to bringing the leg forward, grab the leg from the opposite side of the body and bring if forward and under, crossing his legs. Do as much as he'll allow, and set the foot down slowly and give him a chance to rest it in that position after you stretch

    - given that ligaments attach muscle to bone, it's worth having a massage therapist work on the area to see if there are knots, adhesions in the muscle and/or fascia, and whatnot, and work on the muscles themselves in a more direct manner.

    - As the fitness progresses, any work that involves a longer stride, forward and back, would work that area. This would include cavaletti and gallops.

    BTW - how did this horse stand/hold himself?
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec. 27, 2006
    Posts
    2,058

    Default

    Completely off-topic, but I almost spewed coffee on the keyboard when I read the title, thinking about the human round ligaments (which holds things up inside the female pelvis and upon exiting the pelvic cavity turn into the labia majora.) Wouldnt surprise me to see it discussed on COTH, of course. Apologies, hope your horse recovers with ligaments intact.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan. 18, 2009
    Location
    Pacific NW
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    1,922

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JB View Post
    Your vet would be the one to ask about what mostly not to do, but assuming everything is fair game right now:
    - in addition to bringing the leg forward, grab the leg from the opposite side of the body and bring if forward and under, crossing his legs. Do as much as he'll allow, and set the foot down slowly and give him a chance to rest it in that position after you stretch

    - given that ligaments attach muscle to bone, it's worth having a massage therapist work on the area to see if there are knots, adhesions in the muscle and/or fascia, and whatnot, and work on the muscles themselves in a more direct manner.

    - As the fitness progresses, any work that involves a longer stride, forward and back, would work that area. This would include cavaletti and gallops.

    BTW - how did this horse stand/hold himself?
    Ligament is bone to bone, tendon is muscle to bone. The round ligament holds the femur in the hip socket.

    Not that this horse wouldn't benefit from massage...

    OP, how was this diagnosed?
    Turn off the computer and go ride!



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec. 13, 1999
    Location
    Greensboro, NC
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    Default

    Crud, you're right, I know that, I totally lost my train of thought in that whole thing The whole point was there end up being muscles involved in the neighborhood, since those issues don't exist in a vacuum.
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb. 9, 2005
    Location
    Ocala, FL
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    Default

    (One of the reasons I have not found much on line is because of the human round ligament..... not having had children, I learned something there! And yes I did have equine or horse in my search criteria)

    Anyway, it was diagnosed not only by how he moves - which could be any old crookedness - but also by how he stands. He stands with his right hind slightly forward and slightly turned out (not a farrier issue, trust me). He is also is tight in the muscles behind his tail - deep in there - and his left shoulder is the stiff one. Additionally, this injury is caused by a hard fall and hyperextension - he was a jumper doing the 4' when I bought him.
    Since it involves the femur pelvis joint, it is not typically part of the PP X rays - it requires sedation and laying down to get.

    I learned something abut PP!

    Thanks for the suggestions. I'll add the forward and under stretch. We are actually already doing all of the rest. And yes, massage does help him. He has improved over the last year with regular strengthening, correct work, and stretches with the occasional massage thrown in.

    L



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb. 9, 2005
    Location
    Upper Midwest
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    Default

    This is so interesting, as I'm taking on a rehab today and he has similar symptoms. I still plan to get x-rays done, but on the off chance they are clean I will keep this in mind. Same leg as well.
    Siouxland Sporthorses: http://slsfarm.blogspot.com/

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  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan. 18, 2009
    Location
    Pacific NW
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JB View Post
    Crud, you're right, I know that, I totally lost my train of thought in that whole thing The whole point was there end up being muscles involved in the neighborhood, since those issues don't exist in a vacuum.
    I figured you knew the difference

    And your point was a good one
    Turn off the computer and go ride!



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan. 18, 2009
    Location
    Pacific NW
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by lorilu View Post
    (One of the reasons I have not found much on line is because of the human round ligament..... not having had children, I learned something there! And yes I did have equine or horse in my search criteria)

    Anyway, it was diagnosed not only by how he moves - which could be any old crookedness - but also by how he stands. He stands with his right hind slightly forward and slightly turned out (not a farrier issue, trust me). He is also is tight in the muscles behind his tail - deep in there - and his left shoulder is the stiff one. Additionally, this injury is caused by a hard fall and hyperextension - he was a jumper doing the 4' when I bought him.
    Since it involves the femur pelvis joint, it is not typically part of the PP X rays - it requires sedation and laying down to get.

    I learned something abut PP!

    Thanks for the suggestions. I'll add the forward and under stretch. We are actually already doing all of the rest. And yes, massage does help him. He has improved over the last year with regular strengthening, correct work, and stretches with the occasional massage thrown in.

    L
    Has he been seen by a chiro? That movement and stance can also be caused by what's called an AS ilium. It might be worth having him adjusted. I have had good results in other horses with the same issue. It's worth a try anyway....
    Turn off the computer and go ride!



  10. #10
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    Feb. 9, 2005
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    Ocala, FL
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    Default

    Thanks, foggy, he has been seen by a chiro.accupuncturist. The vet also tested his accupressure points and he was totally non-reactive.

    Btw, my trainer rode him yesterday and reports he was light, through, and over his back.... another person at the barn remarked how good he looked.

    L



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