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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan. 12, 2003
    Location
    New York
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    3,342

    Question Manure Spreaders

    My barn is thinking of getting a manure spreader. How do they work, good? Do they spread shavings from the stalls too? Does it actually grind the manure up? We looked at one through Farnam, but their sizes are 25 bushels or 75-what is a bushel when it comes to manure? Thanks!
    Kristen

    Kiwayu & Figiso Pictures:
    http://community.webshots.com/user/kiwayu



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr. 11, 2007
    Location
    Middle Tennessee
    Posts
    952

    Default

    How do they work, good? Good is by whose definition and what the objectives are. They work terrific to spread manure in spreadable places (not the pasture the horses are eating in) because there isn't a manure pile to build up and attract flies and all their little children. Spread manure dries out quickly and the odor quickly dissipates. It sure beats dumping by hand.

    The bad to some: Some people complain if they are spreading into the wind and they get manure in their hair and eyes<--- wear a do rag, ball cap and wide sun glasses, problem solved, no one ever said farming at any level let you climb off the tractor looking like you just stepped out of Horsemen's Chronicle. <--no pun it's just a phrase I've used for 40 years


    Do they spread shavings from the stalls too? Absolutely.

    Does it actually grind the manure up? Nupe, but if the paddles catch the horse dropping just right it will break them up while flinging.

    We looked at one hrough Farnam, but their sizes are 25 bushels or 75-what is a bushel when it comes to manure?

    Think an old time round clothing basket for a reasonable bushel visual. A 25 bushel manure spreader is not near big enough for a boarding barn. I have a 23 bushel and I only have four horses. It does the job. That is what is known as a compact sized manure spreader.

    If the boarding barn has 6 or more horses they need to be looking at farm sized manure spreaders but that only works if they have a FARM tractor to pull it as opposed to a compact tractor. That's a whole lot of weight.

    My 23 bushel manure spreader weighs 450# EMPTY. Mine is made by Loyal-Roth who have been making farm equipment of all shapes and sizes since the 1950's.

    Tractor Supply carries Loyal-Roth but most stores have to order them. Mine was only $1,500 because there is no tax on it, plus we got a $100 off "coo-pun" thru the mail just in time to buy it.

    http://www.loyal-roth.com/

    Buying a compact sized manure spreader will mean more trips to the field on cleaning days but the Barn may not be able to afford a farm sized manure spreader that is in top condition.

    Another important question to be asking is "chain drive, a/k/a ground driven, or PTO"? Even though my compact John Deere tractor is equipped with PTO, I bought a ground driven manure spreader so I can also pull it with my 4-wheeler if I want to.

    The down side to a chain drive manure spreader is that you have to get on and off the tractor to engage the levers that make the chain go round the paddles fling manure, and get off the tractor again to turn them off after the manure spreader is emptied.

    That being said it would not make sense to buy a manure spreader with a PTO if the tractor doesn't have PTO

    Hope this helps



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb. 23, 2005
    Location
    Spotsylvania, VA
    Posts
    12,702

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Kiwayu View Post
    My barn is thinking of getting a manure spreader. How do they work, good? Do they spread shavings from the stalls too? Does it actually grind the manure up? We looked at one through Farnam, but their sizes are 25 bushels or 75-what is a bushel when it comes to manure? Thanks!
    I have the model 200
    http://www.newerspreader.com/models.htm

    I like it because it grinds up the bedding and drops it out the bottom, not flinging it into the wind. I have 10 stalls, bedded with pellets. I load up the spreader and put 4 manure tubs in the back of my golf cart and that usually takes care of all the stalls.

    I pull the spreader with the cart, when the spreader is empty I dump the remaining 4 tubs into the spreader and keep going.

    It works well for shavings also though shavings will burn grass.

    It will NOT work with straw or if your horses like to mix a lot of hay into their bedding.

    ETA: I have a heavy duty all wheel drive golf cart. Also I do not leave manure in the spreader overnight
    I wasn't always a Smurf
    Penmerryl's Sophie RIDSH
    "I ain't as good as I once was but I'm as good once as I ever was"
    The ignore list is my friend. It takes 2 to argue.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    May. 22, 2002
    Location
    where the grass is greener
    Posts
    706

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by carolprudm View Post
    It will NOT work with straw or if your horses like to mix a lot of hay into their bedding.
    Ditto.

    Nothing worse than being on the far side of the field and the spreader paddles get jammed with hay.
    It's happened enough times, I don't spread anymore without carrying a steel pitchfork so I can loosen up the wad of "stuff" wrapped around the paddles.

    If I go too fast I get hit in the back with flying manure balls! Oh, Joy!
    You're entitled to your own opinion, not your own facts!



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun. 22, 2008
    Location
    Outside Ocala FL - Horse Capital of the World
    Posts
    6,190

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    That's the nice part about the Newer Spreader, no flying buns! I love mine! I've had it for 6 years now, only replaced one part.

    I only have 3 horses, and I don't even have to spread every day if I don't want to, it holds two days worth of stall cleaning. (my horses spend a lot of time outside).
    There are friends and faces that may be forgotten, but there are horses that never will be. - Andy Adams



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr. 8, 2005
    Location
    Kentucky
    Posts
    4,308

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    I'm a firm believer in "real" farm equipment if you have a tractor to pull it. I bought my NH spreader for $450 at auction about 9 years ago. It's probably about 40 years old. Had to replace the chain a few years ago and got lucky- our local dealer had one like new in his basement that we got for $75. Had to do minor modifications (change paddles and shorten chain) but it was worth it to save $400. We'll have to replace the floor in the next couple years but other than that I expect it to last at least another 10 years, hopefully more! We only spread ours when it's full- sometimes it takes 2 weeks to fill. Ours is PTO driven, so in the summer when we can't spread on the fields, we can pile it up on the edge of a field somewhere. The other nice thing about full size spreaders- it'll spread a load that has a lot of wet hay or straw in it!



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr. 12, 2010
    Posts
    23

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    ABI makes spreaders that do grind up the manure before spreading on the ground. They have a larger commercial style spreader similar to the Newer Spreader and they also offer traditional style spreaders in a variety of sizes.

    http://www.abiequine.com/products/spreader/index.php



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan. 12, 2003
    Location
    New York
    Posts
    3,342

    Default

    Are there any spreaders that will spread hay (wet or dry)??? I think we'd need one of those.
    Kristen

    Kiwayu & Figiso Pictures:
    http://community.webshots.com/user/kiwayu



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct. 13, 2004
    Location
    Sterling, IL
    Posts
    347

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    Quote Originally Posted by shakeytails View Post
    I'm a firm believer in "real" farm equipment if you have a tractor to pull it. I bought my NH spreader for $450 at auction about 9 years ago. It's probably about 40 years old. Had to replace the chain a few years ago and got lucky- our local dealer had one like new in his basement that we got for $75. Had to do minor modifications (change paddles and shorten chain) but it was worth it to save $400. We'll have to replace the floor in the next couple years but other than that I expect it to last at least another 10 years, hopefully more! We only spread ours when it's full- sometimes it takes 2 weeks to fill. Ours is PTO driven, so in the summer when we can't spread on the fields, we can pile it up on the edge of a field somewhere. The other nice thing about full size spreaders- it'll spread a load that has a lot of wet hay or straw in it!
    I wholeheartedly second this. I had an OLD John Deere H Series spreader that I got from a local horse owner "secondteenth-hand" for $300 when he was moving up to an even bigger one. I had to be well over 50 years old. I LOVED that spreader. We used it on a farm with 3 regular stalls and 2 foaling stalls (which were bedded with hay and straw) as well as several paddocks which were cleaned regularly. We would just fill up the spreader every few days, and it was ground-driven so I just hooked it up to my SUV and pulled it.

    I sold it when I moved to the new facility last year, and I doubled my money on it. Those old, big spreader are worth their weight in gold, I tell ya. I am kicking myself for selling it, as I am looking at getting another one now, anyway.
    www.four-leaf-farm.com
    Proud Breeder of Trakehners and Anglo-Trakehners.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb. 16, 2003
    Location
    MI USA
    Posts
    7,109

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    We have had both a Millcreek and now a John Deere. I loved the Millcreek, it is smaller but built with large spreader components. So that means REAL chain between the spreader bars that push out manure, REAL paddles that can deal with straw and hay, sawdust and full loads of manure. This was a ground drive model, with LARGE, V-tread tires that worked the chain and beater bar pretty well.

    The other small spreaders have tiny tires, small chain and bars, with usually ineffective paddles or beater bars to get the manure broken up as you spread. I have several friends with those kind, which are a constant headache to keep working. You would not dare let the manure sit very long, chains and bars would rust away.

    So compare your small spreaders, check for quality parts, larger dimension chain, and gearing. They sure are NOT all equal. I think the Millcreek are a good brand, hold up to daily use very well. Come in many sizes.

    Unfortunately for us, the Millcreek was hit by a truck, twisted beyond repair. Could not afford another new one, so we found the elderly, used John Deere with PTO. Have to say I REALLY like the PTO feature, which allows dumping in particular spots for piles if needed. I think ours is a 40 bushel model which is a bit big, but the price was good. I pull it with a Ford 8N, no trouble handling the loaded spreader, or running the manure out. This spreader will handle straw, hay, sawdust, no problem. It needed a new floor, not too hard to install. I try not to let anything sit overnight. Standing urine and manure eats chains and bars, wood floors, lots faster than daily dumping allows. We do have to replace some links now and again, husband has made new spreader bars as they are needed. Stuff does wear out!

    Word of warning, since you are in a cold climate, DO NOT let the spreader sit with a load in winter. You or barn folks will be very unhappy if the load freezes and you have to chunk things loose by hand to dump it. The PTO will not save you then, just rips the frozen load lose from the chain and chain gets broken. Spreaders of the type you talk of, can not manage frozen solid manure.

    A local boarding place had a new girl doing chores with a newer, monster spreader to dump into. They had always laughed at us dumping daily, said frozen manure was no problem for THEM! She was supposed to tell the farm manager when spreader was full so they could empty it. She did NOT, kept dumping onto spreader, with overload bedding going off the sides to the ground. When farm manager remembered they hadn't dumped in QUITE a long time, went to check things, the spreader was frozen solid inside the lean-to. Both the frozen inside load and the overflow had built up around the spreader so badly they could not get the spreader outside at all. Narrow 3-sided lean-to did not allow any entry to dig it out, held the frozen stuff tight and deep against the spreader, in the shade of roof. It took until May to unthaw the DEEP manure to pull out the spreader, and another week to scrape things down to thaw the bottom layers and empty the machine. What a NIGHTMARE! It was VERY cold that year, way below zero for days, so no way to deal with it until spring. They had some serious manure piles outside the barn that then had to be loaded and spread. So even the biggest machine can be stopped if you don't care for it well.

    If you have the tractor, get the PTO on spreader, saves much work for the people.



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