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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov. 14, 2008
    Posts
    175

    Default Potential GP Prospect-WWYD

    My horse is jumping really well right now. Marched around the meter .20 and meter .30 in VT in the GP Ring 1st time out, and this was his first show- hasn't been in training, didn't go to FL etc. Has jumped bigger at home with no problems. When he was originally imported the broker thought he could be a GP horse. I didn't buy this horse as an investment. I bought him as a "forever" horse for me to show-and with enough scope to take care of me. But...if he could be a GP horse, should I send him out so we can see? Is it a waste to keep a horse that has that kind of potential for his weeny amateur rider (me) to trot around on? It would be cool if he could really do it, but on the other hand, I suppose I wouldn't be able to ride him, and I love riding him. I don't know if I want to give that up so I can sit at the shows with a glass of wine cheering him on..Anyone out there have a GP or Derby horse they share with the trainer (obviously not crashing it over fences the day before GP!) but do you get to do anything with it? I need to figure out if I am going to keep putting $$ into him for training. It cost me almost 3K to be in Vermont last week for five days to get to give him mints and wrap his legs. That money could buy me a whole lot of lessons....



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug. 27, 2008
    Posts
    395

    Default

    He is your horse and he doesn't care if he is jumping GP at big shows or hanging out in your back yard. If you love him and love riding him, do what you want with him. Some people enjoy watching their horse go around with a trainer and do well. If you have an investment horse, this is best because you will get more money for a great performing horse being ridden really well.

    It sounds like you're a little resentful of the money as I would be too so I say do what you want and don't adhere to the pressure you might feel from others. Spend your money on lessons and clinics and ride your horse which you bought to do. Good luck, he sounds like a great boy.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar. 24, 2010
    Location
    Tucson
    Posts
    7,288

    Default

    I believe that your responsibility to your horse is to keep it as healthy and happy as you are able, as sound as you are able, etc. I don't believe it is your responsibility to pay money to see the horse compete at the highest level it is capable, or that the horse will know the difference. If you and your horse are doing well together, and doing what you want to do - I think you should stick with it.

    While some horses are unhappy without a professional or professional-type ride, it doesn't sound as if that's the case with your horse. And it sounds like you're happy doing what you've been doing. I say don't change that, and feel secure in knowing your horse can always do more if you want.
    My horse is a dressage diva so I don't have to be.

    Quote Originally Posted by katarine
    If you have a fat gay horse that likes Parelli, you're really screwed



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun. 10, 2009
    Posts
    1,683

    Default

    If I had one with GP potential I'd let my trainer make him up and show him that level.

    Who's to say you can't still ride him? Maybe this is unusual but just for example...my friend who is very much an amateur who certainly isn't the most skilled rider. He rides with toes pointed down and sometimes catches the horse in the mouth. He has a young, horse that trainer is starting to show in the bigger classes. Owner still shows it in the .95s and 1.0m every day of the show, even on the same day that he shows in the mini prix or welcome with trainer. Granted he's only doing 1.25 right now, but it can be done. There have been occasions where the ammy rides earlier in the day perhaps had a negative influence on the bigger classes, but he is consistently in the ribbons in the mini prix and wins almost every class with the ammy.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun. 24, 2010
    Location
    West Michigan
    Posts
    447

    Default

    I think you should continue to enjoy him and kick everyones butt at the lower levels - why don't YOU deserve a really great horse? Is he well cared for? Does he have SOMETHING to do? If so - thats all that matters.
    Concordia means "Harmony" in Latin.
    Full Time Dressage Addict



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug. 23, 2002
    Location
    Prospect, ME
    Posts
    4,583

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Concordia View Post
    I think you should continue to enjoy him and kick everyones butt at the lower levels - why don't YOU deserve a really great horse? Is he well cared for? Does he have SOMETHING to do? If so - thats all that matters.
    -Jessica



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov. 9, 2006
    Location
    Finger Lakes Region of NY
    Posts
    975

    Default

    He's yours and if you enjoy riding him, keep him for yourself. I'd be thrilled to have a horse that fancy to ride!



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan. 22, 2003
    Location
    South FL
    Posts
    1,302

    Default

    Horses don't know "potential." They know sitting in the field and eating grass. Your horse has no idea it could jump GP, so why don't you do what you enjoy with him? As long as he is happy, he could care less if he reaches his "full potential." Have fun!



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb. 1, 2001
    Location
    Finally...back in civilization, more or less
    Posts
    11,819

    Default

    I have a horse that might have been able to show at that level. He has a ton of scope although frankly he doesn't love going fast so would not likely have been the winner.

    Several times in the years I have owned him, I have been approached by professionals who wanted me to hand him over "so he could reach his potential." Frankly, I'm not interested.

    My horse loves his job packing me around the amateur rings. I do enjoy watching a friend who is a trainer jump him around the professional classes (first year green, NOT the GPs!) because it is a nice tune up for him, and enjoyable for me to watch without any risk of pounding him or coming anywhere close to the outer limits of his ability.

    Three grand a week is a lot of money to hand over some mints and play amateur groom. If you aren't dying to sit in that VIP tent (which will also be on your dime!!) to watch your horse further a pro's career... I'd keep him for yourself and enjoy him as an amateur horse. IMO it's a nicer, lower stress life for him and a LOT more fun for you!
    **********
    We move pretty fast for some rabid garden snails.
    -PaulaEdwina



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan. 25, 2009
    Location
    Rock Chalk!
    Posts
    3,270

    Default

    Do whatever is going to make your time with the horse happier, and worth your money. My horse is capable of going MUCH higher than I am. Yes, I'm trying to learn to jump bigger on him, but doubt I'll ever get to his level. That's fine. He's doing the job he has now.
    A proud friend of bar.ka.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar. 20, 2007
    Posts
    535

    Default

    I agree with Lucas


    but on the other hand..didn't a nice jumper just get sold for 8 Mil ?
    That kinda $$ can get you a nice new ammy horse with some change left over to show.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Dec. 28, 2001
    Location
    over yonder
    Posts
    3,138

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by kimball1 View Post
    Marched around the meter .20 and meter .30 in VT in the GP Ring 1st time out
    I sure hope you left a 1 out and he was actually marching around the 1.2 and 1.3 meter classes , otherwise it might be hard to predict future talent
    Auventera Two:Some women would eat their own offspring if they had some dipping sauce.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Mar. 24, 2010
    Location
    Tucson
    Posts
    7,288

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by RockinHorse View Post
    I sure hope you left a 1 out and he was actually marching around the 1.2 and 1.3 meter classes , otherwise it might be hard to predict future talent
    Meter .2 = 1.2m and meter .3 = 1.3m
    My horse is a dressage diva so I don't have to be.

    Quote Originally Posted by katarine
    If you have a fat gay horse that likes Parelli, you're really screwed



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Aug. 1, 2004
    Location
    Golden State
    Posts
    466

    Default

    aka meter 20, meter 30 etc.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Sep. 8, 1999
    Location
    Libertyville, IL USA
    Posts
    4,108

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jack16 View Post
    He is your horse and he doesn't care if he is jumping GP at big shows or hanging out in your back yard. If you love him and love riding him, do what you want with him.
    This.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Dec. 28, 2001
    Location
    over yonder
    Posts
    3,138

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by netg View Post
    Meter .2 = 1.2m and meter .3 = 1.3m

    Now that there are so many sub-one meter classes around, I never see this written this way around here
    Auventera Two:Some women would eat their own offspring if they had some dipping sauce.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Sep. 16, 2008
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    80

    Default

    If you are intrested in seeing the horse progress with proper training you may want to consider sending over to Germany. I know it may sound crazy but some of our nice ones we send over there. Even if you add in the shipping you could blow that easy at a couple of shows here in the states. Showing over there is much much less then here. Just food for thought
    Saddle Brook Farm
    Breeding Performance
    http://www.hunterjumperprospects.com



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Mar. 24, 2004
    Location
    Pottstown, PA (East Coventry)
    Posts
    3,766

    Default

    Unless you want a pro to take him at the GP level so he has experience so you can eventually take him at that level I wouldn't. I could see having a pro ride him one level above you so that when you ride him at the lower level he is more confident for you and you are more confident that he can do that level with room to spare, so to speak.
    They only have so many jumps in them. I would think they have less jumps the higher they go. Use those jumps for yourself.



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jan. 1, 2008
    Posts
    5,177

    Default

    Boy, that's a tough one.

    A horse showing (and winning) in the GPs is worth about a gazillion dollars more than a horse packing an amateur around the A/O ring.

    If you are really intent on keeping him for yourself, then no, I'd send the horse a different direction. If you can make serious money on the horse, then you might want to think about it. Think about the financial impact, as well. It's mucho big bucks to keep and show a horse at the GP level, I mean A LOT.



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Dec. 25, 2005
    Location
    Cazenovia, NY
    Posts
    1,080

    Default

    I think you need not worry to much about it.

    The road to the GP ring is long, slow, and calculated.

    Right now you are talking about the 4' give or take less than 6 inches, no comment on your horse, but this is a long ways away from 5'6", and all the GP route entail.

    I would suggest just continuing what YOU are doing. Get the best coaching you can get and embrace it. Who knows perhaps in a couple/three years this may be a serious option, and you can worry about this "nice problem to have" then.

    You know it is possible that with a good trainer/program/horsemanship both you and the horse may develop into legitimate big route prospects



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