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  1. #1
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    Aug. 6, 2010
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    Default Advice -- Thinking about adopting a Scottie dog

    Does anyone here own a Scottie? I've never owned a dog before, and am wondering if this breed might be a good match for me. I was searching around online a bit and found an adult Scottie that needs a home. I'm interested in adopting an adult because I like the idea of giving an adult dog another chance. I'm not opposed to getting a puppy, though. I'm only in the very first stages of considering this, and I will give it a lot more thought before taking any action. But I'm interested in getting some perspectives from Scottie owners.

    How did you choose the breed? What have your experiences been? Did you adopt or get your dog from a breeder? Is there anything you can think of that I should be considering at this point that I perhaps haven't thought of yet?



  2. #2
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    Aug. 6, 2010
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    BTW, I just made this username, but have actually been a member for a few years. I didn't post a ton, but did some and communicated via PM with some people. I hadn't logged in for a few months and discovered today that my account was somehow compromised and someone was posting under my name. I notified a moderator, but I don't think that I will be using that account any more.



  3. #3
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    Apr. 4, 2007
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    Scotties can be very aggressive to other dogs. Be careful and socialize very well. Even then, you may find that you aren't welcome in dog parks!

    I once saw a four month old Scottie shake a baby poodle to death. Just that fast. Becareful with cats and socialize well. It is the ratter instinct.

    They also can be ankle biters -although they reach the lower calf and can have a nasty terrier bite (they don't let go right away). They are territorial about their owners to a fault.

    Meet both parents, make sure of temperament. I have had a fair amount of experience with scotties and it one of the terrier breeds known for aggression. Not all, all the scottie owners don't have to jump on me. But be careful to check bloodlines and socialize.
    Luistano Stallion standing for 2013: Wolverine UVF
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  4. #4
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    Apr. 29, 2008
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    Houston, TX
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cielo Azure View Post
    Scotties can be very aggressive to other dogs. Be careful and socialize very well. Even then, you may find that you aren't welcome in dog parks!

    I once saw a four month old Scottie shake a baby poodle to death. Just that fast. Becareful with cats and socialize well. It is the ratter instinct.

    They also can be ankle biters -although they reach the lower calf and can have a nasty terrier bite (they don't let go right away). They are territorial about their owners to a fault.

    Meet both parents, make sure of temperament. I have had a fair amount of experience with scotties and it one of the terrier breeds known for aggression. Not all, all the scottie owners don't have to jump on me. But be careful to check bloodlines and socialize.
    Good points, but all the ones I've ever met (never owned one) have been very pleasant little dogs.

    It's always great to adopt older dogs, plus, if they've fostered with someone for a bit, you have an idea of temperament and training level since they're all grown up. Don't fall in love with one that really does not meet your needs. Just like with horses, green owner + green dog = no fun and lots of work/headaches...



  5. #5
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    Apr. 6, 2010
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    San Diego, CA
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    Scotties are not for the first time owners honestly. I'd vote for a Westie (West Highland Terrier.) Scotties are stubborn, can be aggressive, protective, and a bit of a trouble maker.
    http://www.thinklikeadog.com/
    The lady in the link above owns and trains several scotties.
    http://www.akc.org/breeds/scottish_terrier/index.cfm
    AKC Link on them. I've been in contact with several scotties though I have never owned one nor been with one for very long. (Grooming assistant.)

    http://www.akc.org/breeds/west_highl...rier/index.cfm
    LOVE the westies. I've never met one I didn't like and I should have gotten one instead of the Miniature Schnauzer I got. Awesome personalities, great with kids, not as much of a bully as many of the terrier breeds and very family orientated. They can be diggers (all terriers can be.) and they need to be socialized properly as well as trained by either clicker or food or both. They don't like the aggressive trainers or people and won't back down in a fight.

    Another option would be to head over to your local shelter or if you are in the area of Sunkissed Acres see if she might have anything that interests you.
    Adoring fan of A Fine Romance
    Originally Posted by alicen:
    What serious breeder would think that a horse at that performance level is push button? Even so, that's still a lot of buttons to push.



  6. #6
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    May. 30, 2008
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    Texas
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    I have had Scotties for 20 years. Currently have two. I have found them more true to the Terrier characteristics as puppies. Older Scotties, while not exactly dour, are calmer and more self sufficient. I have not seen aggression to other dogs (I have had rescues of other breeds over the years) or to humans. They do protect the territory vocally and sound like far larger dogs than they are. I have not had a problem with digging out of the yard, although one of mine digs random holes in the yard. They are bred to hunt small vermin, and will hunt whatever substitute for that you have: squirrels, rabbits, or in my case incredibly large grasshoppers. I did obedience train all my dogs as puppies, and maybe that helps with behavior. They are very loyal to their owners, and most of mine have chosen a family member as their person, but will be sociable with every one else. My current two year old has chosen DH as her person, and he who is not a dog person is now basking in her adoration .



  7. #7
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    Apr. 30, 2002
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    do it, do it -- LOFF scotties!
    "Passion, though a bad regulator, is a powerful spring." -- Emerson
    www.eventhorse.wordpress.com



  8. #8
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    May. 2, 2001
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    Tallahassee, FL
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    I LOVE mine. He has been nothing short of perfect. I found the breeder online and I had to be vetted very carefully before I was allowed to own one of her pups.

    He does bark, but only when outside in the yard and the fox or wandering dogs come through -- I do wish I had done obedience work with him when he was because he cannot be off leash outside his fence or he runs, runs, runs. I swear, he runs faster and farther the more I call him.

    Those short little legs are faster than you'd think!

    No aggression towards other dogs or people. In fact, he isn't really submissive to the two girl dogs, but they do eat first. He does bark at the horses and has pretended to snap at Harvey's nose, but only when he is on the outside of the fence. If he goes to the barn with me, he gets very small if the horses even notice him.

    Love the breed
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  9. #9
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    Jul. 14, 2000
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    NM
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    When I was a teen we had one. We adopted her as an adult - probably about 4 years old - from a vet tech program at the college my father worked for that adopted dogs out at the end of the semester. Wonderful little girl. She was very good natured and a happy, happy girl. Wasn't aggressive to other dogs but did have a tendency to wander - probably why she was found wandering and placed in the program. We all loved Tatters and she lived another 12 years w/us before passing on from kidney disease.

    We have a Westie now. He is also a wonderful little guy - quite a bit like Tatters - except that he is much more sensitive. We can't say a cross word to him as he really takes it to heart and is just crushed. I do have to say - we decided one day to take the Westie to the groomer - he was about a year old and his first trip in. The groomer was quite concerned that he had never been to one before when we called to make the appointment. He was wonderful as usual and when she was done she said he could come back any time! We asked her why the concern and she said the week before she had the worst experience w/a Westie that was in for his 1st time too. Apparently Westies aren't all very nice to groomers.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct. 18, 2000
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    Connecticut
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    You really need to use a reputable breeder when purchasing your scottie, because some bloodlines carry Von Williebrands Disease, a blood disorder which is often fatal. We bought a Scottie without knowing anything about this, and ended up traumatized and heartbroken when he died of it at the age of 9 years old. So make sure you ask about this, and check with others who have purchased their dogs from the breeder before purchasing your dog to make sure the breeder isn't covering it up.
    Here is the link on it:
    http://www.scottishterrierdog.com/health.htm

    That said, our dog was a brindle, cost about $800 in the early 1990's, had a nice personality, a wicked stubbron streak, was way too smart for his own good, and became a fabulous companion dog for my mother. She named him after the Scottish poet Robert Burns. He became so attached to her that she could not kennel him when going on vacation because he would become heartbroken and sit and howl for her the whole entire time. So, one of us had to sit at home with him when she went away, whereupon he would sit at the gate of his backyard and howl day in and day out, regardless of the company we tried to provide. They do become attached to their family members, and very protective of them, both in home and out on the streets, which became problematic in his adulthood when they went for walk. The protective instinct kicked in around the age of 2.

    We never had a digging problem, but if you piled the walkway snow (which led to his backyard, all fenced) up too close to the fence in the winter time, he would go out the porch door, climb up the bank, go over the 4' fence, and take himself for a walk. Also, regardless of how much she tried to keep him socialized, he began to snap at children when they tried to pet him. The little hands, fingers and mittens were too much for him to handle. Adults were not a problem. He was walked several times a day, had a spacious backyard, and got a lot of exercise to burn off his energy. He was also very protective of her, which on a walk could become a problem.

    They are really determined to get their own way when they want it, so if you are not good at saying No and meaning it time and time again until you finally get it through their little heads that you mean exactly that, a different breed would be best. If you are looking for a fashionable cuddlebug, I would go with a Westie. Also, know that in some areas Scotties are hard to get, as the breeders sometimes hold back breeding for a season or two. Check with the local breed association for leads on where to go, and do not buy one from a pet store, no matter how tempted you are. Finally, if you check with scottie rescues, you may find some that have wonderful adults up for adoption. Know that most applications require you to have a fenced in yard and no swimming pool, as they aren't good swimmers. You may have to wait to get one, but if your heart is set on it, as was my mother's, it is well worth the wait. She still talks about him to this day, and can't remember a single thing he ever did wrong (oh boy!!).
    Good luck with your search!



  11. #11
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    Mar. 10, 2009
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    I second on the Westies as well. My mom got one from the local Westie rescue, and Fergus is just the coolest little dog. The groomers love him - he just goes merrily right on back when Mom drops him off for his appointment.

    That said - he isn't "typical". He is very un-terrier-like in temperament - you can do anything with him (clip nails, brush teeth), and he loves visitors to the house. (As for terrier instinct - well, he rapidly dispatched an entire litter of baby bunnies in workmanlike fashion before Mom could get him away from the burrow). But he does have one common Westie problem: skin issues. His aren't too bad, but here in the South I've seen plenty of Westies with varying degrees of baldness and red skin.



  12. #12
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    Jan. 21, 2003
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    MA
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    I have a scotty! I also grew up with a scotty. They are STUBBORN and can be VERY protective of their people. That being said, they are wonderful dogs...not too scittish or too energetic but they are playful enough. Mine does not care f or strangers - he is never aggressive to them but he ignores people he doesn't know He is super affectionate to his people and to certain dogs but can be aggressive to other fogs. We have not figured out how he chooses his dog friends!

    I am not sure I would recommend as a first dog, but then again, if you are a strong, patient personality, I can see it working.
    As for the 'ratter' instinct: mine does not exhibit that at all. As a matter of fact, he came racing, barking into the study once to warn me that George (our beagle) had somehow opened the guinea pig cage and was attempting to rid the house of guinea pig vermin!! They like order and routine. They are smart and can be manipulative....rather like ponies

    Oh...people WILL stop you on the street and you will hear things from little old ladies like "OH..looks just like Fala" (FDR's scotty) or "Oh...that looks like the dog that bit the reporter" (Bush's Barney)
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  13. #13
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    Jan. 21, 2003
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chief2 View Post
    no swimming pool, as they aren't good swimmers. !
    LOL! Understatement of the year Mine swims like a cinder block!
    Save a life...be an organ donor! Visit www.Transplantbuddies.org



  14. #14
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    Nov. 30, 2007
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    NC
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    I love my Scottie!!!!!

    He is actually my 17 year old daughter's...but he is my special buddy. We were warned to socialize him, and it works!! He is a hoot, sweet, friendly, funny!!! He is stubborn though -ha! He obeys when he agrees that it is a good idea.
    We have had more laughs at his funny short legs running like the wind...he is a wonderful companion.

    I guess just make sure you and the dog meet and click! Kismet and all that.



  15. #15
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    Jan. 21, 2003
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    Quote Originally Posted by slight View Post
    [B][U]
    We have had more laughs at his funny short legs running like the wind.
    Hahahaha!!! They can be so cute AND so regal at the same time When mine barks, his whole front end comes off the ground. When he was a baby, his head was so big he had some trouble holding it u going up stairs and up hills - seriously! He grew into his head
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  16. #16
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    Oct. 18, 2000
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    One last thing before I sign off: if you do decide to get a scottie, make sure your groomer knows how to do the scottie cut. I once stopped in at my mom's and found a brindle schnauzer at the door. They forgot to discuss that issue before the groomer got to him, and since she didn't know the scottie cut, but knew the schnauzer cut...he looked totally weird!



  17. #17
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    Aug. 6, 2010
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    Miami, FL
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    I love all these Scottie stories! Thanks!

    I got an email from the rescue today saying that they already placed the one I was interested in. I'm going to keep looking for another one to adopt. After reading your replies, I think that a Scottie could actually be a good fit for me. I live alone with no other pets and don't see myself having kids any time in the near future (if ever). I think I have the time to train and care for a little dog with a strong personality. We'll see!



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