The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Results 1 to 20 of 20
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb. 9, 2005
    Location
    Upper Midwest
    Posts
    5,653

    Question What would you think of an ad that didn't list price and just said "make an offer?"

    Would that be a total turn-off?
    Siouxland Sporthorses: http://slsfarm.blogspot.com/

    DIY Journey of Remodeling the Farmette: http://weownblackacre.blogspot.com/



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct. 2, 2007
    Location
    Mirabel, QC
    Posts
    2,656

    Default

    Errrr...

    I am not sure what I'd think. I'd probably think that whatever I could offer would be too low.
    www.EquusMagnificus.ca
    Breeding & Sales - Currently: Eventing & Derby prospects
    Facebook | YouTube |Twitter | LinkedIn



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb. 2, 2004
    Location
    MA
    Posts
    1,769

    Default

    'Make an offer' suggests they just want the horse off the property. So I would think there is either something wrong with the horse or the seller needs to sell ASAP for other reasons. It sounds extremely negotiable.

    For times when I don't want to give out a specific price in an ad, I will say 'inquire for price' or 'private treaty'. To me this is very different from 'make an offer'.
    Linda
    Home of EM Day Dream, SPS Pakesa, & SPS Destiny
    Breeders of USDF HOY Reminisce HM and USDF Reserve HOY Legacy HM
    http://wbstallions.net/hof-mendenhall/



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct. 21, 2003
    Posts
    8,672

    Default

    As a current horse shopper, no it would not be a TOTAL turn off for me. If I looked at the pictures and video and thought that the horse was realistically worth what I have as a price range, I would call and make an offer of what the horse is worth to me.

    The problem as I see it is in the case of a really nice horse that a seller might take less for than I think the horse is truly worth. Say it's a nice, younger, well conformed horse getting good scores at first level. These horses can be priced really high by some people, but say the seller is willing to take 15k for this horse to a really good home and good rider. I may or may not call expecting the horse to be as much as double that.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb. 26, 2008
    Posts
    753

    Default

    To me it would mean that anything goes. Probably things other then money are of importance - future job, speedy transaction, etc.

    It would not be a turn off for me, but then again, I am comfortable bargaining, and walking away.

    I rarely search specifically for that category as most better quality horses seem to have a bottom line to them or be offered "free to good home" and then the owner gets to be picky where they place their animal.

    I personally dislike "make reasonable offer" as THAT is so nebulous - I may think the horse is worth xx while the owner is convinced it is at least a xxxxx animal.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb. 9, 2000
    Location
    Iowa
    Posts
    1,031

    Default

    I know of a nice enough horse that is just too small and hot for the owner. She is just tired of paying board and training and I believe her Dreamhorse add says something like that. She just wants "done". It happens.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar. 4, 2004
    Location
    Louisville, KY
    Posts
    3,967

    Default

    If you have a range you're willing to let them go in, or an absolute minimum price, I would list a range with an "or best offer" option rather than "make an offer". Make an offer to me sounds like you will take $500 to get them off the property, IMO.

    Caitlin
    Caitlin
    *OMGiH I Loff my Mare* and *My Saddlebred Can Do Anything Your Horse Can Do*
    http://community.webshots.com/user/redmare01



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun. 12, 2010
    Location
    OR
    Posts
    497

    Default

    As someone who is horse shopping, I think it would make more sense to determine how much money you are willing to take and set a price depending on that amount, along with the notation "Will take reasonable offers." Presumably there is a target price desired, and it makes sense not to hide that information.

    Depending on the horse, when I see that in an ad (not that it is very common) I either assume the horse is way out of my price range, or that there is something seriously wrong with it that is not being disclosed.
    MelanieC * Canis soloensis



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb. 23, 1999
    Location
    Cypress, near Houston, Texas
    Posts
    8,431

    Default

    I'd think "they need to get this horse sold for some reason, so if I like it, I will make an offer based solely on what I think it is worth to me. Worse that can happen is they say no."

    Nothing wrong with that. Sh*t happens in life that sometimes makes selling a horse imperative without regard to "value."

    I would NOT necessarily think there was something wrong with the horse, but I WOULD inquire carefully about it before making an offer.
    Visit Sonesta Farms website at www.sonestafarms.com or our FaceBook page at www.facebook.com/sonestafarms. Also showing & breeding Cavalier King Charles Spaniels.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr. 26, 2008
    Posts
    309

    Default

    Well I think it'd be a turn off. Usually when I am horse shopping I have a specific price range im looking in and I enter into the search engine so "make an offer" wouldn't even show up I don't think. But when I see "make an offer" i usually wouldn't consider it. I wouldn't inquire unless I REALLY like the horse. If I were you i'd think of a price and then add OBO or negotiable to the end of it.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar. 16, 2003
    Location
    Wet and Windy Washington
    Posts
    3,777

    Default

    Horse shopping is hard enough as it is without that.

    I wouldn't even bother calling to be honest.
    I have horse to sell to you. Horse good for riding. Can pull cart. Horse good size. Eats carrots and apples. Likes attention. Move head to music. No like opera! You like you buy.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Aug. 2, 2009
    Location
    Osteen, FL
    Posts
    1,634

    Default

    I just started a new project called The Equine Synergy Project, in which I act as a sort of "real estate" agent for Breeders with high quality horses and as a "talent scout" for riders/trainers. When representing horses on the website, I am careful to word the pricing.

    i.e- "Asking" $x or if the horse really needs to be sold I'll add "(All reasonable offers considered)"= negotiable, but "x" is the ball park figure.

    When I was on the other side of the market and shopping, "make an offer" to me, came off as though the owner was desperate to sell, for anything to get the horse off the property.
    Ryu Equestrian & Facebook Page
    Sakura Hill Farm & Facebook Page
    Boarding, Training, Consignment Sales & Breeding
    Osteen & Gainesville, Florida.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Dec. 4, 2007
    Location
    Ontario
    Posts
    1,942

    Default

    I pass right over sales ads that have "make an offer" and "private treaty." I would rather the seller categorize the asking price range than be that vague.

    I shop within a specific range, so if the ad doesn't have a number on it (especually if it's PT) then I'm going to assume it's out of my range and keep going.
    Riding the winds of change

    Heeling NRG Aussies
    Like us on facebook!



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Aug. 28, 2004
    Location
    British Columbia
    Posts
    847

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MCarverS View Post
    I just started a new project called The Equine Synergy Project, in which I act as a sort of "real estate" agent for Breeders with high quality horses and as a "talent scout" for riders/trainers. When representing horses on the website, I am careful to word the pricing.

    i.e- "Asking" $x or if the horse really needs to be sold I'll add "(All reasonable offers considered)"= negotiable, but "x" is the ball park figure.

    When I was on the other side of the market and shopping, "make an offer" to me, came off as though the owner was desperate to sell, for anything to get the horse off the property.
    I am interested in the Equiine Synergy Project, however, your site speaks about Monica...Monica WHO? A facial shot of whoever is the agent on this site would be helpful. I like the idea as I am in the beginning stages of selling some of my horses...finally... I'm sure you have just started work on your site as it is a bit vague at the moment. Would like to hear more and do you deal with clients in Canada? I guess i could have emailed to the address on your site, sorry.
    Dark Horse Farm



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jul. 24, 2006
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    5,362

    Default

    If the horse is really nice then I assume that my offer will be way too low.

    If the horse is not really nice (or poorly represented by photos) then I assume there's something very wrong with it that makes the owner want to get rid of it.

    I think a price range, or even "mid 4 figures" or "low 4 figures" gives at least an idea of what you're talking about.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Feb. 9, 2005
    Location
    Upper Midwest
    Posts
    5,653

    Default

    Thanks you guys.

    I was having a discussion with another gal the other night, who has several horses for sale. We were discussing this exact topic and had different viewpoints, so I wanted to hear what others thought (without going into the specifics).
    Siouxland Sporthorses: http://slsfarm.blogspot.com/

    DIY Journey of Remodeling the Farmette: http://weownblackacre.blogspot.com/



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Nov. 1, 2005
    Location
    The Prairie
    Posts
    5,425

    Default

    "Make an offer" suggests urgency. I think a seller who states "make an offer" can expect a lot of low ball offers. JMO.
    I love cooking with wine. Sometimes I even put it in the food.



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Nov. 25, 2008
    Location
    Stuttgart, Germany
    Posts
    558

    Default

    I saw a nice green horse at a clinic once that the owner was completely overfaced on (as in made the owner/rider cry...) and when I mentioned I liked the horse she said "make me an offer then"... So I did which was $4,000 for a green mare that I didn't know the history of or anything. The owner looked at me like I'd grown another head and stated that the horse was worth "much more". If only I had been a little older and little more bold then I would have said something to her.... but anyway. Moral of the story is that I think people that say "make me an offer" are on crack. I think there is a 98% chance they will be completely offended with the offer. I won't even look at a horse that says make an offer or all reasonable offers considered.



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jun. 11, 2004
    Location
    Still here ~ not yet there
    Posts
    6,430

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by TrotTrotPumpkn View Post
    Would that be a total turn-off?
    Yes!

    I can't stand ads that don't list a price. One of my fellow Teke breeders has 3-4 horses listed under "Make An Offer," and I know she wants $3000-7000 for them, which is not what most people think of when they think "cheap."

    However, if I really loved the horse, I would contact the seller and say, "What are you hoping to get for this horse? I really like him, but I just want to know if we are on the same page price-wise."

    Eventually SOMEBODY has to come up with a real number. And you go from there.



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Nov. 30, 2008
    Location
    Zone 5, Great Lakes Region
    Posts
    164

    Default

    Just don't list the horse for $1. After months and months and months of horse shopping, and sifting though ads, nothing was more of a turn off to me than a horse listed for $1 and then at the bottom of the ad, "call for price". If the price is a private treaty, just say so, but listing your horse for $1 makes someone who very well may be interested in your horse and able to afford it, decide to walk away. When you list a horse for $1, the prospective buyer can only speculate what your horse may be worth, and may not even take the time to make the phone call. "Offered in the mid-5 figure range" or "offered in the high 4-figure range" gives the buyer at least a bit of an inclining as to what you are hoping to get for you horse.



Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 12
    Last Post: Mar. 1, 2012, 11:09 AM
  2. "Make Offer" on eBay - Am I stuck with saddle?
    By BEARCAT in forum Off Course
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: Mar. 26, 2011, 08:48 AM
  3. Asking price vs. the offer you make
    By schimmel in forum Dressage
    Replies: 110
    Last Post: Dec. 16, 2009, 03:50 PM
  4. when they say "make an offer"...
    By littletuna in forum Eventing
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: Dec. 14, 2009, 05:34 PM
  5. How much is "make an offer"?
    By IrishKharma in forum Endurance and Trail Riding
    Replies: 69
    Last Post: May. 10, 2009, 02:55 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •