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View Poll Results: how much naughtiness do you tolerate when riding?

Voters
125. You may not vote on this poll
  • none-I expect angel-like behavior 100% of the time

    36 28.80%
  • once in a while-maybe a buck at the canter in a field or just coming off stall rest

    71 56.80%
  • almost every ride-I like the exuberant types!

    7 5.60%
  • other-not sure what I am missing but please explain if you check this

    11 8.80%
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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul. 11, 2007
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    MA
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    1,309

    Default how much naughtiness to you tolerate?

    I am curious to see what the "norm" is for others. What types of "tricks" bother you when riding.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar. 9, 2006
    Location
    Lucama, NC
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    5,868

    Default

    I don't tolerate any behavoir other than what I ask for. I train horses and they need to be 100% solid when someone else rides them. If they learn early that work is work and they can play the rest of the day they will do so.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr. 29, 2006
    Location
    Evansville, Wisconsin
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    3,081

    Default

    I tend to enjoy the horses who aren't "naughty" just because they feel like tossing out a buck or something, but that have the intellect and self-preservation to let me know (sometimes most emphatically) when *I* screw up



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct. 3, 2007
    Location
    PA
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    5,139

    Default

    I checked other because it depends on the horse. A greener horse gets less slack because it is still learning its job. But when the old campaigner decides to throw in a buck out on the trail, it can let you know there is still life in the old guy.

    I have to admit to sometimes laughing at the old ponies who know how to take advantage of little kids. Yes, they need to get corrected but some of them are just so funny about it that it makes me laugh. You can see the wheels turning as they weigh just how much they can get away with.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun. 24, 2010
    Location
    West Michigan
    Posts
    447

    Default

    I think it is interesting that "100% perfection" is an option. MOST times a horse acts out it is either in pain or is confused by what the rider is asking. Also, horses are individuals, not robots, so there are going to be days that are better then others and for the most part, I think we need to accept that as riders and work with what they give us that day. That said, I do not tolerate bucking, rearing, bolting or walking off from the mounting block, etc. But I don't just get on one day and expect my horse to be perfect, you have to train them through clear, consistant riding so they know what is expected..... most horses try to please.
    Concordia means "Harmony" in Latin.
    Full Time Dressage Addict



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan. 31, 2003
    Posts
    18,472

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by shawneeAcres View Post
    I don't tolerate any behavoir other than what I ask for. I train horses and they need to be 100% solid when someone else rides them. If they learn early that work is work and they can play the rest of the day they will do so.
    What she said. When it's your job, they need to be 100%.
    "Kindness is free" ~ Eurofoal
    ---
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct. 24, 2003
    Location
    Hunt Country Heaven, VA
    Posts
    630

    Default

    I don't mind a "playful" buck once in a while as long as it is an expression of feeling good and not thrown in there with the express purpose of dropping me.

    Just today we went on an out ride very early, which was the first one for us in a long time because of this oppressive heat wave. As we cantered up a trail that made a sharp turn, my boy did a flying change and then punctuated it with a fun crow hop afterward like, "Dang! This sure is a lot of fun!" It brought a smile to my face to see him express how much he loves getting out on the trail. Never did it again even though we had a lovely long gallop across a big field with his barn buddy.
    Lost in the Land of the Know It Alls



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun. 20, 2009
    Location
    Northeast Ohio, where mud rules your world...
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    1,366

    Default

    depends on the horse and the situation. Before I correct a behavior, I always say to myself, "Self, horses don't do as they're told for three reasons. They can't, they won't, or they don't understand. Which one is it right now?"

    Can't can mean pain, physically unable or not fit enough or just plain not athletically inclined to do as asked.

    Won't is where the naughtiness comes in and is generally the least given answer. Won't means a horse has a state of mind not a physical handicap of any sort.

    Don't understand - well, they just don't know what the right answer is and they are going to instinct with a protective behavior. It could mean that they are hunting and guessing for the answer and may get frustrated. It may mean they are overfaced and just don't have the answer.

    When I can answer this in my head then I react accordingly. And yes, with experience, you can do this in a nanosecond.
    ...don't sh** where you eat...



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov. 9, 2005
    Location
    uk
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    15,292

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by shawneeAcres View Post
    I don't tolerate any behavoir other than what I ask for. I train horses and they need to be 100% solid when someone else rides them. If they learn early that work is work and they can play the rest of the day they will do so.
    echo echo



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul. 11, 2007
    Location
    MA
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    1,309

    Default clarification

    I guess I should clarify whether a horse is green or trained...



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Dec. 31, 2009
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    The Great Plains of Canada
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    Default

    I clicked the 'other' vote because I don't expect my horses to be dead drones - I expect us to be able to communicate back and forth. If I make a mistake or ask something of them that I do not realise is unfair/causing them pain/discomfort, etc etc, I expect them to let me know. I want them to offer up suggestions and to be interacting with me. I want my Quarab or Paint to ask if he can go after the cow I missed who is sneaking off into the bush, or my OTTB's or Warmbloods to (politely) ask if they can go over that jump, or if this maneuver is the next dressage move I want of them. I cannot conscientiously 'not tolerate' or punish a certain behaviour that represents their only way of communicating to me. I really do not focus on specific 'problems', typically, as I find that as you develop the horse and become more in sync with them, those 'problems' and 'poor behaviours' vanish.

    I want my horses to communicate back and forth with me and I respect their opinion and dignity, however as a result of the way I work with them, once we have what I consider a strong foundation/partnership (balanced trust and respect going back and forth) and they are sufficiently emotionally developed to cope with what is being asked of them (emotionally collected - cool, calm, assertive), they are 100 percent behaved (to the point where others, even kids, can ride them safely - no matter their problem past). I don't look at it as 'misbehaviours' I can or cannot tolerate, this is a partnership that goes both ways - we both have input. If you're in sync though and are communicating effectively, everything runs smoothly though anyways, so I never have to worry about what I do and do not have to 'tolerate' or 'poor behaviours'.



  12. #12
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    Dec. 31, 2009
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    The Great Plains of Canada
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by winfieldfarm View Post
    depends on the horse and the situation. Before I correct a behavior, I always say to myself, "Self, horses don't do as they're told for three reasons. They can't, they won't, or they don't understand. Which one is it right now?"

    Can't can mean pain, physically unable or not fit enough or just plain not athletically inclined to do as asked.

    Won't is where the naughtiness comes in and is generally the least given answer. Won't means a horse has a state of mind not a physical handicap of any sort.

    Don't understand - well, they just don't know what the right answer is and they are going to instinct with a protective behavior. It could mean that they are hunting and guessing for the answer and may get frustrated. It may mean they are overfaced and just don't have the answer.

    When I can answer this in my head then I react accordingly. And yes, with experience, you can do this in a nanosecond.
    Very nicely put! I personally add: if it is a matter of 'won't' - why is that? What can I do to change that state of mind?? What do I need to earn from the horse?



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Oct. 1, 2005
    Location
    Sandy, Utah
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    6,662

    Default

    I voted 'once in a while,' because I don't expect even my Very Good Horses to be perfect, all the time. I'm sure not!

    The 'however' is that I DO expect 100% response when I ask one to do something, even if he is upset, say, by the smell of a cougar. Yeah, in that context, if his instinct is to Leave The Scene I am probably right there with him. But I would expect him to leave on 'my' terms or 'our mutual' terms, IOW, not an uncontrolled bolt.

    I would add- if the response- a buck, or disobedience- is due to pain, well, that's an explanation, but it's not an excuse. I will certainly scope out any potential cause for pain, but I still don't tolerate the bad behavior. Example- on a trail ride earlier this summer my mare suddenly got goofy on me. I got after her for the goofiness, and she quit. Sure enough she had a tail full of burrs bothering her. So, okay. When she was walking quietly and in full radio contact with me after the little fit, I dismounted and deburred. To say a buck or bolt or such is 'okay' because the horse is uncomfortable is eventually to say it's okay for the horse to buck you off every time a fly lands on it. That isn't okay, in my book.

    Admittedly, a playful buck that is easier to sit than many canters will sometimes be met with my chuckle, like when a kindergarten kid pulls a no-no. But I still usually force myself to correct the horse, because such things can and do escalate to bad stuff. A horse needs to understand it must never, ever buck when tacked up.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jun. 10, 2002
    Location
    Spain
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    715

    Default

    Naughty behavior I always correct, natural behavior, such as a legitimate spook at something scary I accept.



  15. #15
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    Dec. 31, 2009
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    The Great Plains of Canada
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Beverley View Post
    To say a buck or bolt or such is 'okay' because the horse is uncomfortable is eventually to say it's okay for the horse to buck you off every time a fly lands on it.
    I have to disagree with this statement and only wanted to mention it because I did say that such behaviour is ok, so wanted to explain why I do not see it the same way. To be honest I have never had a problem with a horse bucking every time a fly lands on it (etc, I catch your drift) just because I said it was ok to buck or bolt in other instances. In fact, I usually see the exact opposite response. Just saying



  16. #16
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    Jan. 25, 2009
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    Default

    I don't expect perfection. I know that my riding is not perfect, and so if my horse misbehaves I try to remember that I may be the culprit. I intentionally bought a teenaged, trained horse. I do correct "naughty" behavior, but I do think that some things are legitimately spooky and I expect that. I try to use good judgment. If I know that the horse has been confined to a stall due to weather, etc., then I lunge just in case the horse wants to buck, etc.



  17. #17
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    Jan. 29, 2008
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    Ottawa,Ontario
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    There is a lot of variables when it comes to my tolerance of naughtiness. Is it nappiness? Then no, zero tolerance is the norm. Nappy is a no no!!! Naughty? Hmm, our little ottb is naughty, sometimes, and it's hilarious! She thinks she's all that, snaking her head etc, little bucks here and there...naughty, yes, but it's all in good fun and part of the learning curve. There is a time and a place, and my horses know it! All horses are going to have bad days, frisky, feeling their beans days, and that is fine with us. But, when it's game time, good behaviour is a must.



  18. #18
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    Jul. 24, 2008
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    3,810

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    Quote Originally Posted by shawneeAcres View Post
    I don't tolerate any behavoir other than what I ask for. I train horses and they need to be 100% solid when someone else rides them. If they learn early that work is work and they can play the rest of the day they will do so.
    This.



  19. #19
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    May. 3, 2006
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    11,568

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    I've checked other.

    I want a horse with a bit of something about it that can think for itself and I've no problem at all if they one has a banana round something scary or puts in a buck out of excitement.

    Whether I even bother to correct would be dependent on the circumstances and if it's just daft moment.



  20. #20
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    Apr. 22, 2006
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    I find that I don't tolerate as much as I get older. I used to like the exuberant types, I don't bounce any more.
    "The captive bolt is not a proper tool for slaughter of equids they regain consciousness 30 seconds after being struck fully aware they are being vivisected." Dr Friedlander DVM & frmr Chief USDA Insp



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