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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul. 22, 2010
    Location
    Newcastle, CA
    Posts
    4

    Question These Boots Where Made For...

    I was curious to find out what fellow equestrians think about the new SmartPak advertisment - These Boots Where Made for... I got the ad initialy in the mail that had 15+ boots if i remember correctly.

    Here is the Link-
    http://blog.smartpakequine.com/2010/..._-1007-_-Boots

    As a dressage ridder i don't know that i would use the example #5 on the link as a boot for my horses (for dressage), I prefer support all the way around, not so much just if they wack themselves or something. I like boots that work like Polo wraps for just about everything aside from XC and trails - Then i like a good pair of Woof Brushing boots, other then that i just dont get it! lol.

    Somtimes I feel as if a good $15 set of polos (properly wraped) beats the $250 full set of jumper boots. I just want to know how you feel about boots!

    Boots vs. Polos

    Thanks!!
    My Thoroughbreds are my Therapy.
    -Rescue an Off the Track Thoroughbred.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan. 22, 2003
    Location
    Chicago, IL
    Posts
    1,083

    Default

    Well I'm in the opinion that a small piece of material wrapped around a horse's ankle will not support the joint when thousands of pounds of pressure is being put on it. No matter what type of boot, there is no support. You can only offer protection from scrapes and bangs. Polos offer minimum protection because they can easily be sliced right through. I only use them for decoration.

    I never use boots for dressage, and only white polos on nice occasions or schooling at shows. I don't want to add extra heat to the legs when the horse is already working and heating up. If I were to use boots during schooling for dressage, I probably would use something similar to the ones pictured because they offer comfort and protection from interference.

    For XC, I do think the boots that are shown work well because they are designed to ventilate air while still offering maximum protection.

    The boots they show for jumpers are commonly used because jumpers want their horse to feel it if they hit a rail.

    I don't agree with using neoprene boots for turn-out, though, because they overheat the tendons.

    I think it's neat that Smartpak did an ad like this-- it sure makes it easier to find products to search through and compare.
    ~Isabel



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov. 13, 2005
    Location
    Kentucky
    Posts
    4,124

    Default

    I am with CatchMe on this one. Polos are used for decoration and boots for protection rather than support. My horse flats without anything and I use Woofs for jumping. I rarely use polos (although I have at least 10 sets in a rainbow of colors!) just because of the hassle and heat down here. I cannot imagine being wrapped in polar fleece this time of year!



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar. 4, 2009
    Location
    Arizona
    Posts
    1,110

    Default

    I ride dressage too and I like the open front, hard shell boots because they actually provide some protection if my horse hits herself. I've seen more and more dressage riders in the warmups using them, too. I agree that polos don't really offer much in the way of protection… they just look pretty.



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